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Currently I have a bunch of if else statements to set CategoryId's based on how many items are in each collection.

For example,

public class TeamWork
{
    public string EmployeeName { get; set; }
    public int CategoryId { get; set; }
}

public class BLL
{
    public void SetCategoryId(ICollection<TeamWork> Converted, ICollection<TeamWork> Sourced)
    {
        if (Converted.Count == 1 && Sourced.Count == 1)
        {                
            if (String.Compare(Sourced.First().EmployeeName, Converted.First().EmployeeName) == 0)
            {
                // set category id to 1
                Converted.First().CategoryId = 1;
                Sourced.First().CategoryId = 1;                                            
            }
            else
            {
                // set category id to something                  
            }
        }
        else if (Sourced.Rows.Count == 1 && Converted.Rows.Count > 1)
        {
            // set category id to something           
        }
        // more if else statements...
    }
}

I think there's a better way to do this perhaps by applying some design pattern. Any suggestions? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Chain Of Command could fit –  simendsjo Mar 17 '11 at 16:03
    
Design pattern might be overkill for setting two field... –  Jean-Christophe Fortin Mar 17 '11 at 16:15
    
yes if i had only 2 fields design pattern it would be overkill. haha. currently there's about 12 if else statements (and growing...). –  dm80 Mar 17 '11 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Chain of responsibility is the way to go.

So this object is passed to a series of command objects until one is able to act upon and set the status.

share|improve this answer
    
An huge chain of responsability for setting two field its a little bit overkill haha but I agree that if he want to go with the design pattern's way, it's the right pattern. May I suggest to add this link to your answer : exciton.cs.rice.edu/JavaResources/DesignPatterns/book/hires/… . it's a reference of the GOF book. –  Jean-Christophe Fortin Mar 17 '11 at 16:14
    
Thanks everyone! Found a good C# example for chain of responsiblity -dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternChain.aspx#csharp –  dm80 Mar 17 '11 at 16:29

A Strategy pattern comes to mind. Try to break these rules down into a series of "if this condition is true, then the category ID is this". Make each one of these a method, then add those methods as delegates to a List<Func<ICollection<TeamWork>, ICollection<TeamWork>, bool>> or a comparable indexed collection. Then, your SetCategoryId() code looks like this:

public void SetCategoryId(ICollection<TeamWork> Converted, ICollection<TeamWork> Sourced)
{
    foreach(var categoryRule in CategoryRules)
    {
       var category = test(Converted, Sourced);
       if(category != 0)
       {
          Converted.First().CategoryId = Sourced.First().CategoryId = category;
          break;
       }
    }
}

The above code would never have to change regardless of how many rules you added or removed. However, with the if - else if structure you have, your series of rules will likely be order-dependent, so be careful when setting up the rules in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Strategy/Visitor does not break off the chain so it will carry on passing till the end. So Chain-Of-Responsibility is better. –  Aliostad Mar 17 '11 at 16:19
    
Small change; the above loop will now break out after finding the first strategy that produces a value. However, the order of execution of each strategy is critical and totally dependent on the order they're assigned to the List, so I do agree that a chain-of-command pattern would be better here. –  KeithS Mar 17 '11 at 18:17

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