Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to find only unique cell arrays within a set of cell arrays. For example, if this is my input:

I = {{'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'b' 'c'} ...
     {'d' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'c' 'e'}};

Then I would want my output to look like this:

I_unique = {{'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
            {'a' 'b' 'c'} ...
            {'d' 'e'} ...
            {'a' 'c' 'e'}};

Do you have any idea how to do this? The order of elements in the output doesn't matter, but efficiency does since the cell array I could be very large.

share|improve this question
    
Does the order of cells in the output matter? Do you need them in the order that they appear in the input? Also, are you dealing with a lot of cells to compare (i.e. is speed an issue)? –  gnovice Mar 17 '11 at 17:22
    
Did you intend each cell to contain a single string with embedded single-quotes, or to contain a list of single-character strings? You're getting the former - a doubled quote "inside" a string is just an escaped quote. To get the latter, break up the string literals with spaces, like {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'}. –  Andrew Janke Mar 17 '11 at 18:00
    
Hi, the order doesn't matter. The time of computing is important, because input data can be large. I'm sorry that I didn't specify this in question - it's possible that element in one cell consists of more than one characters i.e. {'a1''a2''a3'}. –  user664664 Mar 17 '11 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

EDIT: Updated to use a more efficient algorithm.

If efficiency is tantamount due to a large number of sets in I, then your best option is probably to roll your own optimized loops. This problem bears some similarity to a previous question about how to efficiently remove sets that are subsets of or equal to another. The difference here is that you are not concerned with removing subsets, just duplicates, so the code in my answer to the other question can be modified to further reduce the number of comparisons made.

First we can recognize that there's no point in comparing sets that have different numbers of elements, since they can't possibly match in that case. So, the first step is to count the number of strings in each set, then loop over each group of sets that have the same number of strings.

For each of these groups, we will have two nested loops: an outer loop over each set starting at the end of the sets, and an inner loop over every set preceding that one. If/When the first match is found, we can mark that set as "not unique" and break the inner loop to avoid extra comparisons. Starting the outer loop at the end of the sets gives us the added bonus that sets in I_unique will maintain the original order of appearance in I.

And here is the resulting code:

I = {{'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...  %# The sample cell array of cell arrays of
     {'a' 'b' 'c'} ...          %#   strings from the question
     {'d' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} ...
     {'a' 'c' 'e'}};
nSets = numel(I);                    %# The number of sets
nStrings = cellfun('prodofsize',I);  %# The number of strings per set
uniqueIndex = true(1,nSets);         %# A logical index of unique elements

for currentSize = unique(nStrings)   %# Loop over each unique number of strings

  subIndex = find(nStrings == currentSize);  %# Get the subset of I with the
  subSet = I(subIndex);                      %#   given number of strings

  for currentIndex = numel(subSet):-1:2      %# Outer loop
    for compareIndex = 1:currentIndex-1      %# Inner loop
      if isequal(subSet{currentIndex},subSet{compareIndex})  %# Check equality
        uniqueIndex(subIndex(currentIndex)) = false;  %# Mark as "not unique"
        break                                %# Break the inner loop
      end
    end
  end

end

I_unique = I(uniqueIndex);  %# Get the unique values
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, that's exactly what I need. –  user664664 Mar 17 '11 at 19:05

If your cells contain only sorted single characters then you can retain just the unique sequences using:

>> I = {{'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} {'a' 'b' 'c'} {'d' 'e'} {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} {'a' 'b' 'c' 'd' 'e'} {'a' 'c' 'e'}};
>> I_unique = cellfun(@char, I, 'uniformoutput', 0);
>> I_unique = cellfun(@transpose, I_unique, 'uniformoutput', 0);
>> I_unique = unique(I_unique)

I_unique = 

    'abc'    'abcde'    'ace'    'de'

You can then split the resulting cells into single characters again:

>> I_unique = cellfun(@transpose, I_unique, 'uniformoutput', 0);
>> I_unique = cellfun(@cellstr, I_unique, 'uniformoutput', 0);
>> I_unique = cellfun(@transpose, I_unique, 'uniformoutput', 0);
>> I_unique{:}

ans = 

    'a'    'b'    'c'


ans = 

    'a'    'b'    'c'    'd'    'e'


ans = 

    'a'    'c'    'e'


ans = 

    'd'    'e'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for answer. –  user664664 Mar 17 '11 at 19:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.