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I have this query that's running too slow. I'm not sure what all info I should provide in order to make it easy for you to help me, but I'll take a stab at it and then add more when you big-brains inevitably ask for stuff that I either didn't think to include or don't know what is.

I want to identify customers (but using only part of their address -- accommodating households and businesses) who first registered a purchase in 2006.

My first attempt was:

select
    distinct a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5)
from 
    registrations r
    join customers c on r.custID = c.id
    join addresses a on c.addressID = a.id
where year(r.purchaseDate) = 2006
    and a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5) not in (
        select
            distinct a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5)
        from
            registrations r
            join customers c on r.custID = c.id
            join addresses a on c.addressID = a.id
        where
            year(r.purchaseDate) < 2006
    )

and when it was running too long, I switched a NOT EXISTS (with which I am less comfortable, but willing to experiment) like

select
    distinct a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5)
from
    registrations r
    join customers c on r.custID = c.id
    join addresses a on c.addressID = a.id
where
    year(r.purchaseDate) = 2006
    and not exists (
        select
            1
        from
            registrations r
            join customers c on r.custID = c.id
            join addresses ia on c.addressID = ia.id
        where
            ia.line1 + '|' + substring(ia.zip,1,5) = a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5) and
            year(r.purchaseDate) < 2006
        )
group by
    a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5)

But it runs too long too. Like no results in 17 hours kind of too long. I think the first thing to consider is where my SQL might be wrong or sub-optimal but in case it's not that, I want to also give you enough info to consider the environment.

So, diagnostic info. You probably don't care, but just in case: it's running on a G6 server with four quads and 20 GB RAM; each query is limited to occupying four processors to keep performance up for requests from the web server; when I'm running this query, we're clearing off other big imports and reports because of deadlocks but the web server is customer-facing and can't be stopped.) There are roughly: 15 million registrations, 11 million customers and 8.6 million addresses. I rebuilt all of the indexes just to be sure that fragmentation wasn't the problem. However, I'm not really sure how to index properly, so I'm totally open to this being a problem -- some of these indexes were a result of me futzing around and some were scripts that one of the MS analysis tools gave me to improve performance. I'm also not exactly sure how to convey index info to you, so I'll just give the create scripts:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[registrations] ADD  CONSTRAINT [PK_flatRegistrations_1] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [Id] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]

.

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[customers] ADD  CONSTRAINT [PK_flatCustomers_1] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [Id] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]

.

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[addresses] ADD  CONSTRAINT [PK_addresses] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [ID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [addresses] ON [dbo].[addresses] 
(
    [line1] ASC,
    [line2] ASC,
    [city] ASC,
    [state] ASC,
    [zip] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [deliverable] ON [dbo].[addresses] 
(
    [addressDeliverable] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [_dta_index_addresses_5_1543676547__K9_K1_6] ON [dbo].[addresses] 
(
    [addressDeliverable] ASC,
    [ID] ASC
)
INCLUDE ( [zip]) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [_dta_index_addresses_5_1543676547__K1_K9_6] ON [dbo].[addresses] 
(
    [ID] ASC,
    [addressDeliverable] ASC
)
INCLUDE ( [zip]) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [_dta_index_addresses_5_1543676547__K1_6] ON [dbo].[addresses] 
(
    [ID] ASC
)
INCLUDE ( [zip]) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]

Thanks a bunch for your time!

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried without distinct ? because you have a group by clause with the same column. And with a IN clause with the opposite Select ? –  malinois Mar 17 '11 at 16:57
    
What's your execution plan say is taking so long? Look for scans (tables and indexes) as opposed to seeks. –  Brad Mar 17 '11 at 16:59
    
@malinois, Oh yeah, I was switching back and forth to see if the plan changed. And I don't get how I'd alter the subquery to switch to IN -- if that's what you're suggesting. –  clweeks Mar 17 '11 at 16:59
    
And check the execution plan for missing indexes. –  malinois Mar 17 '11 at 17:02
    
@Brad, I don't really know what I'm doing with the execution plan. The biggest costs I see are Row Count Spools, an index seek and a clustered index scan (each of these four things are 14%). –  clweeks Mar 17 '11 at 17:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think your Not Exists subquery's table alias is wrong. Try this:

select  r.custID,
        a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5) 
from    registrations r     
join    customers c on r.custID = c.id     
join    addresses a on c.addressID = a.id 
where   r.purchaseDate between '2006-01-01' and '2006-12-31'      
and not exists (         
        select  1         
        from   registrations ir             
        join customers ic on ir.custID = ic.id           
        join addresses ia on ic.addressID = ia.id         
        where   ia.line1 = a.line1
        and     substring(ia.zip,1,5) = substring(a.zip,1,5) 
        and     ir.purchaseDate < '2006-12-31'        
        )
share|improve this answer
    
I removed the r.custID from the select-list and made the "address-blobs" distinct and the date in that last line should be '2006-1-1' but otherwise, you were spot-on about the subquery join being the problem! It's running in 32 seconds now. Thanks! –  clweeks Mar 17 '11 at 18:29
    
You can also try removing the NOT EXISTS and replace it with a LEFT\RIGHT JOIN to the table WHERE some field IS NULL. I've seen that make a query 1000 times faster. –  Brad Mar 17 '11 at 19:12

My first try would be replace:

year(r.purchaseDate) = 2006

with:

r.purchaseDate BETWEEN '2006-01-01' and '2006-12-31 23:59:59' 

and also year(r.purchaseDate) < 2006 with r.purchaseDate < '2006-01-01'.

and make sure that there is an index on purchaseDate.

Next thing (if you have enough resources to run it):

 -- create temporary table to prepare data
CREATE TABLE #addrs (yearr int, pattern varchar(100)) -- depends on a.line1 length

-- calculate all patterns for purchase before 1st Jan 2007
INSERT INTO 
  #addrs (yearr, pattern)
SELECT
  YEAR(r.purchaseDate),
  a.line1 + '|' + substring(a.zip,1,5)
from
    registrations r
    join customers c on r.custID = c.id
    join addresses a on c.addressID = a.id
where
    r.purchaseDate < `2007-01-01`

-- optionally, but could be useful in query below
CREATE INDEX idx_temp ON #addrs (pattern, yearr)  

-- original query rewritten
SELECT
  DISTINCT pattern
FROM
  #addrs a
WHERE
  a.yearr = 2006
  and not exists (
    select top 1 1 
    from 
       #addrs aa 
    where 
       aa.pattern = a.pattern
       and aa.yearr < 2006
  )

Second solution could have some typos and could not compile from first try. It's just an idea.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I'm adding an index for that, should the purchaseDate be the only column in the index? –  clweeks Mar 17 '11 at 17:22
    
Yes. purchaseDate should be enough -- assuming that custID column is covered with clustered index (i.e. custID is primary key). Otherwise custID should be added to index as included column. –  Grzegorz Gierlik Mar 17 '11 at 21:02

SubString(A.zip, 1, 5) must be causing the table scan. Is this one time query? If so, get the result of the below query and store it in a new table. Make indexes on AddressToCompare and PurchaseDate and run your subsequent query against the new table.

Select
      R.ID
    , R.CustID
    , C.AddressID
    , A.line1 + '|' + SubString(A.zip, 1, 5) As AddressToCompare
    , R.PurchaseDate
From
    Registrations R
    Inner Join Customers C On R.CustID = C.ID
    Inner Join addresses A On C.AddressID = A.ID
Where
    R.PurchaseDate <= '2006-12-31'
share|improve this answer

First your logic is poor, business and customers move in and out of addresses, so comparing on the address rather than the customer is a guarantee of wrong results. Just becasue ABC copmany ordered something in 2002 does not mean that DEF company didn;t have thier first corder in 2006 as ABC comapny and DEF Company have no relationship to each other. If you need relationships of people inteh same company or household then havea table to to store them properly, don;t rely on incorrect hack.

Assuming you can't do this and this is aproces that will run more than once, then you need to persist a column inthe address table with

line1 + '|' + substring(zip,1,5)

This prevents you from having to calculate it on the fly.

share|improve this answer
    
The vast majority are US addresses and we run them through the National Change of Address process four times per year. We track the ones that are lost to no-forwarding-address and we keep the customers.addressID updated as the customers move around. We've been doing this for this client for fifteen years and we manage to do a moderately good job of keeping them square. Our real address problem comes from having the same data entered with tiny imperfections, only some of which are trapped during address hygiene. –  clweeks Mar 17 '11 at 18:09

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