Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a print_dot() function that outputs dot on stdout. That way I can do:

$ ./myprogram < input | dot -T x11

It works great when I try to print one graph.

Now when I print several graphs, nothing shows up. The dot window is blank, X11 and dot take all the CPU. Nothing is printed on stderr.

$ echo -e "graph  { a -- b }" | dot -T x11 # work
$ echo -e "graph  { a -- b } \n graph { c --d }" | dot -T x11 # doesn't work

# it seems to be interpreted nonetheless
$ echo -e "graph  { a -- b } \n graph { c -- d } " | dot -T xdot
graph {
    ...
}
graph {
    ...
}

Also, when I remove the \n between the 2 graphs, only the first graph is interpreted (what a nice feature...):

$ echo -e "graph  { a -- b }  graph { c -- d } " | dot -T xdot
graph {
    ...
}

Piping the xdot output to dot again doesn't fix the problem.

So, how does one render multiple graphs with graphviz?

share|improve this question

One calls dot multiple times. Or one puts everything into a single graph, taking care to avoid duplication of names.

share|improve this answer
3  
3 hours wasted. Great. – knarf Mar 17 '11 at 17:35
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simple script that reads graphs on stdin and opens multiple dot instance.

#!/usr/bin/perl

my $o;
my @l;


while(<>) {
    if(/^\s*(di)?graph/) {
        push @l, $o;
        $o = '';
    }

    $o .= $_;
}

if($o =~ /graph/) {
    push @l, $o;
}

for(@l) {
    if(fork() == 0) {
        open my $p, '| dot -T x11' or die $!;
        print $p $_;
        close $p;
        exit 0;        
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.