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How to compare in shell script?

Or, why the following script prints nothing?

x=1
if[ $x = 1 ] then echo "ok" else echo "no" fi
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first line: $x=1 –  Hossein Mar 17 '11 at 18:21
5  
you need a ; after ] and a space after if: if [ $x = 1 ]; then echo "ok" ; else echo "no" ; fi –  Sergio Mar 17 '11 at 18:21
    
@Sergio it gives bash: syntax error near unexpected token `then' –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:22
    
@Hossein it gives 1=1: command not found –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:23
    
maybe my bash files (on the system) are with some problem? –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With numbers, use -eq, -ne, ... for equals, not equals, ...

x=1
if [ $x -eq 1 ]
then 
  echo "ok" 
else 
  echo "no" 
fi

And for others, use == not =.

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By using -eq and the ; after ] it gives bash: syntax error near unexpected token `then' –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:26
    
By changin just my == to -eq it still prints nothing here.. –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:26
    
Yes, in fact you have to let a "space" before and after each "["... I just edited a valid code. –  William DURAND Mar 17 '11 at 18:28
    
yes, it's right now! (gosh, what an error..) –  Tom Brito Mar 17 '11 at 18:31
    
@Tom do not use '==' instead of '='. The 'test' command (aka '['), whether builtin or external, often accepts '==', but '=' is more universal. Using '==' unnecessarily limits the portability of the script. –  William Pursell Mar 19 '11 at 22:55

It depends on the language. With bash, you can use == operator. Otherwize you may use -eq -lt -gt for equals, lowerthan, greaterthan.

$ x=1
$ if [ "$x" == "2" ]; then echo "yes"; else echo "no"; fi
no

Edit: added spaces arround == and tested with 2.

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You need spaces around the "==" -- try your command with [ "$x"=="2" ] and you'll see that's true too. You need [ "$x" = "1" ] or [ $x -eq 1 ], or with bash [[ $x == 1 ]] or (( x == 1 )) –  glenn jackman Mar 17 '11 at 18:31
    
thanks for that correction, manual indent issue.. But [ ] works too. –  Aif Mar 17 '11 at 18:33

Short solution with shortcut AND and OR:

x=1
(( $x == 1 )) && echo "ok" || echo "no"
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