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// AirlineTicket.h

#include <string>
class AirlineTicket
{
public:
  AirlineTicket();

  ~AirlineTicket();

  int          calculatePriceInDollars();
  std::string  getPassengerName();
  void         setPassengerName(std::string inName);
  int          getNumberOfMiles();
  void         setNumberOfMiles(int inMiles);
  bool         getHasEliteSuperRewardsStatus();
  void         setHasEliteSuperRewardsStatus(bool inStatus);

 private:
   std::string  mPassengerName;
   int          mNumberOfMiles;
   bool         fHasEliteSuperRewardsStatus;
 };

I want now what is the meaning of ~AirlineTicket(); in this code? I don`t know the meaning of "~" (tilde).

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5  
The fact that you're asking the question suggests that you have not yet read a basic introductory book on C++ - you should probably make it a priority to do so before you get much further with learning the language. –  Paul R Mar 17 '11 at 18:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It is the destructor. It gets called when you destroy (reaching end of scope, or calling delete to a pointer to) the instance of the object.

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1  
Or when deletion automatically occurs. –  justkt Mar 17 '11 at 18:22
10  
Note that ~ can also denote bitwise not in a different context. –  GeorgeAl Mar 17 '11 at 18:25
    
+1 but added precision on the "delete" word. –  Klaim Mar 17 '11 at 18:25

It's also called bitwise negation (complement), as in the following contexts/examples:

int a = ~100;
int b = ~a;

Output: (ideone)

-101
100
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9  
not in this context. –  Sujoy Mar 17 '11 at 18:28
4  
@Nawaz "what is the meaning of ~AirlineTicket(); in this code?" is not answered by "bitwise negation", it is a destructor –  Daniel DiPaolo Mar 17 '11 at 18:40
3  
@Nawaz that is literally the question, I am quoting the asker, they're asking what it means in this code and your answer doesn't address that –  Daniel DiPaolo Mar 17 '11 at 18:44
5  
@Nawaz this is not a place to dump random related information, answers are supposed to address the question being asked, yours does not - regardless of whatever caveats you put in your explanation –  Daniel DiPaolo Mar 17 '11 at 18:49
3  
+1 It's important that this answer is on this page, or the OP might have gone away thinking that the tilde -- which he's _never seen before in C++ -- is only used as part of a destructor's name. And that's just not true. (Though in order to make it a really decent answer, you ought to have spoken about destructors, too.) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 9 '11 at 15:37

It's the class destructor. You might want to pick up an introductory text on C++ development, as destructors are a fundamental concept in OOP. There is a good reference site here, and the C++ FAQ is another good resource.

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4  
Better yet, check out the Definitive C++ Book Guide and List. –  Fred Larson Mar 17 '11 at 18:31
    
@Fred +1 great link –  Glenn McAllister Mar 17 '11 at 18:32

~ signs that it is a destructor and when ever the object goes out of scope, corresponding destructor is called.

When the destructor is called ?

Taking an example -

#include <iostream> 
class foo
{
    public:
    void checkDestructorCall() ;
    ~foo();
};

void foo::checkDestructorCall()
{
    foo objOne;   // objOne goes out of scope because of being a locally created object upon return of checkDestructorCall
}

foo:: ~foo()
{
    std::cout << "Destructor called \t" << this << "\n";
}

int main()
{
    foo obj;    // obj goes of scope upon return of main
    obj.checkDestructorCall();
    return 0;
}

Results on my system:

Destructor called   0xbfec7942  
Destructor called   0xbfec7943

This example just serves to indicate when a destructor is called. But destructor is written only when the class manages resources.

When class manages resources?

#include <iostream> 
class foo
{

    int *ptr;

    public:
    foo() ; // Constructor
    ~foo() ;

};

foo:: foo()
{
     ptr = new int ; // ptr is managing resources.
                     // This assignment can be modified to take place in initializer lists too.
}

foo:: ~foo()
{
    std::cout << "Destructor called \t" << this << "\n";
    delete ptr ; // Returning back the resources acquired from the free store.
                 // If this isn't done, program gives memory leaks.
}

int main()
{
    foo *obj = new foo;
    // obj is pointing to resources acquired from free store. Or the object it is pointing to lies on heap. So, we need to explicitly call delete on the pointer object.

    delete obj ;  // Calls the ~foo
    return 0;
}

Results on my system:

Destructor called   0x9b68008

And in the program, you posted I don't see a need to write destructor. Hope it helps !

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~ introduces a destructor. It's used because (a) it was available, ad (b) ~ is one (of several) mathematical notation for "not".

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~AirlineTicket(); is the destructor for the class AirlineTicket

see this link for further reference

The destructor is called when you delete the object of that class, to free any memory allocated or resources being used by the object.

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