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I understand that starting with iOS 4, there is now the ability to not declare iVars at all, and allow the compiler to automatically create them for you when you synthesize the property. However, I cannot find any documentation from Apple on this feature.

Also, is there any documentation on best practices or Apple recommended guidelines on using iVars and properties? I have always use properties like this:

.h file

@interface myClass {
    NSIndexPath *_indexPath
}

@property(nonatomic, retain) NSIndexPath *indexPath

@end

.m file

@implementation myClass

@synthesize indexPath = _indexPath;

- (void)dealloc {
    [_indexPath release];
}
@end

I use the _indexPath instead of indexPath as my iVar name to make sure that I don't ever use indexPath when I need to use self.indexPath. But now that iOS supports automatic properties, I don't need to worry about that. However, if I leave out the iVar declaration, how should I handle releasing it in my dealloc? I was taught to use iVars directly when releasing in dealloc, rather than using the property methods. If I don't have an iVar at design-time, can I just call the property method instead?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I've went through many different ways of dealing with this. My current method is to use the property access in dealloc. The reasons not to are too contrived (in my mind) to not do it, except in cases where I know the property has odd behavior.

@interface Class
@property (nonatomic, retain) id prop;
@end

@implementation Class
@synthesize prop;

- (void)dealloc;
{
    self.prop = nil;
    //[prop release], prop=nil; works as well, even without doing an explicit iVar
    [super dealloc];
}
@end
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In constrast, I do the following:

@interface SomeViewController : UIViewController

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *someString;

@end

and then

@implementation SomeViewController

@synthesize someString;

- (void)dealloc
{
    [someString release], someString = nil;
    self.someString = nil; // Needed?

    [super dealloc];
}

@end

Note: At some point Apple will enable synthesize-by-default which will no longer require the @synthesize directive.

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You can access someString directly that way, even when you haven't declared a someString iVar? I thought the iVar wouldn't get created until compilation. Also, how does the comma work? Why isn't that a semicolon? –  GendoIkari Mar 17 '11 at 19:02
1  
synthesize-by-default was a buggy mess when it was in there, but it can't come back soon enough. –  Joshua Weinberg Mar 17 '11 at 19:02
    
@Gendolkari Yes, you can access the synthesized ivars in code just fine. The compiler is smart enough to know they'll be there eventually. You can even modify the name of the synthesized iVar using the '@synthesize obj = _myName' without explicitly declaring _myName anywhere. As for the comma operator its a standard C thing, it evaluates each expression, left to right. And the value of the 'comma expression' is the value of the right side. –  Joshua Weinberg Mar 17 '11 at 19:04
    
Thanks! So the only possible reason I can think of to use a different name for my iVar is still to help avoid accidentally leaving off the self. and accessing the iVar directly when I don't want to... is this a valid concern? –  GendoIkari Mar 17 '11 at 19:07
    
I used to think it was, but decided that it doesn't matter most of the time, and I never access raw iVars anyway outside of the overridden properties. –  Joshua Weinberg Mar 17 '11 at 19:09

You can directly access instance variables using -> symbol instead of dot . (which will invoke ivar's corresponding accessor method):

.h

@interface myClass {
}
@property(nonatomic, retain) NSIndexPath *indexPath

@end

.m

@implementation myClass

- (void)dealloc {
    [self->indexPath release];
    self->indexPath = nil; // optional, if you need it

    [super dealloc];
}
@end

Thus you will directly access iVar and not it's corresponding accessor method, obtaining additional benefit - performance.

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Why was this downvoted? –  GendoIkari Mar 17 '11 at 18:58
    
if downvote me, please leave a comment. Be constructive. –  Martin Babacaev Mar 17 '11 at 18:59
1  
There are number of issues in it, maybe a downvote wasn't the best way to handle it (And has now been backed out). Recommending to use self-> is an odd choice here, and completely unnesary. Also _ is not reserved by Apple for variable names, only for method names. That doesn't change that its 'bad' style though (that is obviously opinion). As an aside __ is reserved by the compiler. –  Joshua Weinberg Mar 17 '11 at 19:01
1  
-> approach is used often in official Apple's code snippets. _ symbol is reserved for instance variables –  Martin Babacaev Mar 17 '11 at 19:06
1  
@Joshua: line noise for you maybe. For me prop = nil is a noise too, because if something wrong in mem-management occur I want my program to crash instead of running abnormally in silence. What I've proposed is not something wrong, the only issue is - it's not up to Joshua's style :) –  Martin Babacaev Mar 17 '11 at 20:34

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