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I am displaying html entity ✓ (a check mark: ✓) in an html document that uses iso-8859-1 for the character set.

In Firefox, it displays as a check mark. In IE, it displays as a square box. Switching to UTF-8 doesn't seem to make a difference.

Is there a reliable way to display these entities in IE 6 & 7 without using images?

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fwiw, it's not displaying on Google Chrome either (in your question) –  ahockley Feb 10 '09 at 22:45
    
It shows for me in Chrome... –  ajm Feb 11 '09 at 18:00
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Square means that the font used does not have the glyph for that character.

Unfortunately, there are not many fonts containing that character, and none of them is present by default on all Windows machines (and even less on non-Windows ones)

The most likely fonts to be present (that contain that glyph) are Arial Unicode MS (comes with Officie), and MS Gothic + family (which is a Japanese font).

See here for a tool that can help you determine that font contains what glyphs: http://www.mihai-nita.net/article.php?artID=charmapex

But if you want a solution that works reliably, an image is your safest bet.

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Useful link, thanks. –  Kramii Jul 2 '10 at 14:26
    
Additional resource for finding out font support: fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/search.htm –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 13 '12 at 14:07
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Per http://www.w3.org, the check mark isn't part of 8859-1: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/sgml/entities.html

It's e29c93 in UTF-8.

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Okay but switching to UTF-8 doesn't make a difference. Is this yet another case of broken IE behavior or is there something else going on? –  pbarney Feb 10 '09 at 22:33
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Character references like ✓ are explicitly Unicode; the encoding of the page itself does not matter for these. –  bobince Feb 11 '09 at 1:52
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Perhaps the typeface used by Internet Explorer doesn’t have a glyph to display this character.

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+1. ✓ is always ✓ regardless of page encoding: if it doesn't appear, it's a font problem. Firefox generally has better font-substitution capabilities than IE. Find a font that has that character in it and list that first in the font style for the element containing it. –  bobince Feb 11 '09 at 1:54
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If it's IE, you can reasonably assume it's on Windows, and hence, there's a WingDings font available... The letter ü in MS WingDings is a simple checkmark (similar to ✓), and þ is a checkmark in a box (similar to ☑).

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You probably want to use font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Arial, Sans-Serif. IE does not display properly unicode chars from Arial...

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You can try the square root symbol, "√", which doesn't look perfect but ok. √

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I specified the font attributes in a style tag and the checkmark is displayed properly in IE7 which is what the majority of my clients are using. Example:

✓ Some text

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