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Consider this situation:

We have two classes generated by Visual Studio, for example Typed Dataset Rows. These classes derive from a common base class which we cannot change. We cannot change the class these child classes derive from, but they are generated as partial classes so we can extend them.

Now we decide to implement an interface for these two classes which define some common methods, but the methods are going to be implemented exactly the same way in both classes. Where is the best place to put these methods so that we are not writing the same code twice.

I could the the code in some helper class or global class, but it seems like there should be a better way.

Here is a quick code example:

public interface ICommonInterface
{
    void SomeMethod(int x);
}

// we cannot change what is in the base class and we cannot derive Child1 or Child2 from
// a different base class, because they are partial classes generated by Visual Studio
// we can extend them, and create an interface though
public partial class Child1: SomeBaseClass, ICommonInterface
{
    public void SomeMethod(int x)
    {
        //this code is the same in both child classes
        //where is the best place to put this to avoid writing 
        //the same code twice
    }
}

public partial class Child2: SomeBaseClass, ICommonInterface
{

    public void SomeMethod( int x)
    {
        //this code is the same in both child classes
        //where is the best place to put this to avoid writing 
        //the same code twice
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would use encapsulation in this case. Create a class (with a private instance in both classes), and delegate the SomeMethod call to the internal, private class implementation.

This eliminates (most) of the duplication, while still allowing the benefits of unique implementations per class as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the way to go, I don't see any better alternatives. Thanks! – Chris Mullins Mar 18 '11 at 18:05
    
@Reed Copsey Just to clarify, would this mean that the method inside the class with the private instances would use something like a switch to serve up the correct instance of the class/method? – dougajmcdonald Nov 17 '11 at 9:13
    
@dougajmcdonald No - in this case, the logic was supposedly exactly the same - there's no need for a switch, the two implementations can use the exact same class... – Reed Copsey Nov 17 '11 at 16:54
    
@ReedCopsey Ah sorry, I misread the answer, I see what you mean create an instance of the 'helper' in each of the distance classes, but call the same method from each class. – dougajmcdonald Nov 17 '11 at 17:07

It looks like the TableAdapter classes contained in .NET datasets has a base class that can be changed in teh designer. Is this the class you are using with partial classes, or could you use this as a way to provide a common base class where these methods could go?

share|improve this answer
    
True, however I need to change the base class on the generated data rows. I didn't see any place to set that. – Chris Mullins Mar 18 '11 at 18:02

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