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I've just installed the new Entity Framework 4.1 NuGet package, thus replacing the EFCodeFirst package as per NuGet intructions and this article of Scott Hanselman.

Now, imagine the following model:

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    // whatever
}

public class UserThing
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
    // whatever
}

The last EFCodeFirst release generated a foreign key in the UserThing table called UserUserName.

After installing the new release and running I get the following error:

Invalid column name 'User_UserName'

Which of course means that the new release has a different FK naming strategy. This is consistent among all other tables and columns: whatever FK EFCodeFirst named AnyOldForeignKeyID EF 4.1 wants to call AnyOldForeignKey_ID (note the underscore).

I don't mind naming the FK's with an underscore, but in this case it means having to either unnecessarily throw away the database and recreate it or unnecessarily renaming al FK's.

Does any one know why the FK naming convention has changed and whether it can be configured without using the Fluent API?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, one of the things that didn't make it to this release is the ability to add custom conventions in Code First:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2011/03/15/ef-4-1-release-candidate-available.aspx

If you don't want to use the fluent API to configure the column name (which I don't blame you), then most straight forward way to do it is probably using sp_rename.

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Thanks, I came across that article too... Pity, but why did it change in the first place? –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 17 '11 at 21:02
1  
I updated my answer to include a suggestion on how to get around the issue, it isn't pretty, but it's probably the simplest. I don't know why the changed the convention. It's one of the downsides of being an early adopter, they can change stuff on you like this. It affects me too as I used it on my personal site, what's even worse, is I wrote a couple of my own conventions, so I'm really up a creek right now. –  Brian Ball Mar 17 '11 at 21:04
    
So you're suggesting sp_rename to rename the current FK's to what the new convention expects? I guess it'll have to do, thanks! –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 17 '11 at 21:13
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Why don't you do the following?

  public class User
  {
    [Key]
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    // whatever
  }

  public class UserThing
  {
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string UserUserName { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("UserUserName")]
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
    // whatever
  }

Or, if you don't want to add the UserUserName property to UserThing, then use the fluent API, like so:

// class User same as in question
// class UserThing same as in question

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
  public MyContext()
    : base("MyCeDb") { }
  public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
  public DbSet<UserThing> UserThings { get; set; }

  protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
  {
    modelBuilder.Entity<UserThing>()
      .HasOptional(ut => ut.User)    // See if HasRequired fits your model better
      .WithMany().Map(u => u.MapKey("UserUserName"));
  }
}
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@Andre - I had already tried the [ForeignKey] attribute but it gave me an error. Which is just as good, 'cos I really don't want to riddle my code with it. And I specifically ask for a solution that does not use the fluent api ;) –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 22 '11 at 10:41
    
@Sergi: I don't know what error you got when you tried it but I tested both implementations against the model you provided and both work fine. You have an answer that works for you, I just wanted to add two more options for how someone can use a foreign key column named differently from the built-in convention. –  Andre Artus Mar 22 '11 at 20:20
    
@Andre - I appreciate it, thanks –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 22 '11 at 20:22
    
@Sergi: My pleasure. I hope it saves someone a bit of time. –  Andre Artus Mar 24 '11 at 14:46
    
@Claude Why is everything called FLUENT? The API is fluent, I understand that. But why is everybody so obsessed with it? Why not call it by declaration (attributes) and by code (fluent). –  yonexbat Jun 18 '11 at 7:26
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