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need help with validating a 9-digit number.

CANNOT BE 
-----------
000000000
111111111
222222222
333333333
444444444
555555555
666666666
777777777
888888888
999999999

4-5 position(s) CANNOT BE 00 -- 123001234

6-9 position(s) CANNOT BE 00 -- 234550000

The nine numbers CANNOT BE sequential -- but only the following 4 four below, for the time being --

012345678
123456789
987654321
098765432

I had just managed to get the first piece done --

"^(?:(?!0+|1+|2+|3+|4+))\d{9}$"

Thanks a TON for the help friends.

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3  
I think you are best to create a bunch of "validation rules" and then pass the number via that. You could create custom attributes on a Property that would enforce such things.... –  CtrlDot Mar 17 '11 at 20:06
    
I'll prefer to create some configurable rule engine in code instead of forcing a solution via regex. –  Felice Pollano Mar 17 '11 at 20:06
    
You need validation on a 9-digit number where 1) the numbers cannot all be the same digit, 2) the 4th, 5th, 6th and 9th digits cannot be zero, 3) the numbers cannot be sequential with the exception of four cases (given above). Is this correct? –  JYelton Mar 17 '11 at 20:08
    
Creating one regex expression to solve this is likely just going to create two problems to solve instead of the one you already have. I'd break it out into separate checks like CtrlDot recommended –  nybbler Mar 17 '11 at 20:09
1  
Based on your first two rules, are you saying positions 4-9 cannot be zero? Or one of 4-5 can be zero but not both? Same with 6-9? –  Dave Rager Mar 17 '11 at 20:18
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5 Answers

A single regex to validate all your rules may exist, but it will be much more easier, readable and maintainable if you write a validation rule (which can be a regex) for each of your criteria.

And as a more general comment, regex are usually great to check what a string IS, but they are not that good when it comes to check what a string IS NOT.

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If it has to be a regex (written in verbose form):

^              # start of string
(?!(.)\1+$)    # not all characters the same
(?!...00)      # pos 4/5 not zero
(?!.....0000)  # pos 6-9 not zero
(?!012345678)  # list of disallowed numbers
(?!123456789)
(?!987654321)
(?!098765432)
[0-9]{9}       # match 9 digits exactly
$              # end of string
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1  
+1 That's a lot nicer than my approach. You could make it fail faster by adding (?=\d{9}$) as the first rule. –  Tomalak Mar 17 '11 at 20:25
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I realize it's not what was asked, but it strikes me that this would be easier as a standalone method, not a regex.

public bool SanityCheckSSN(string ssn)
{
    if(ssn == null || ssn.Length != 9) return false;

    foreach (char c in ssn)
    {
        if (!Char.IsDigit(c)) return false;
    }

    if(ssn == "000000000" ||
       ssn == "111111111" ||
       ssn == "222222222" ||
       ssn == "333333333" ||
       ssn == "444444444" ||
       ssn == "555555555" ||
       ssn == "666666666" ||
       ssn == "777777777" ||
       ssn == "888888888" ||
       ssn == "999999999" ||
       ssn == "012345678" ||
       ssn == "123456789" ||
       ssn == "987654321" ||
       ssn == "098765432" ||
       ssn.Substring(3, 2) == "00" ||
       ssn.Substring(5, 4) == "0000")
    {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
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You might also want to ensure that it's in fact a 9-digit string. Otherwise, +1 –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 17 '11 at 20:16
    
I was assuming that type of verification was taken care of elsewhere, but as you like... –  David Yaw Mar 17 '11 at 20:20
    
to all friends -- i used the following regex expression and it worked in VB.NET. now i need to use the same in Javascript too -- i tried the following --------------------var txt = document.getElementById('<%= txtSSN.ClientId %>'); var textValue = parseInt(txt.value); var regSSN = new RegExp("^(?!(\d)\1*$)(?!\d{3}00)(?!\d{5}0*$)(?!0?123456789?$)(?!0?987654321?$)\d‌​{9}$"); alert(regSSN.test(textValue)); ----- i get a FALSE for any 9 digit i eneter. did i miss on something ? –  CocaCola Mar 24 '11 at 1:40
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  • Same digit:
    ^(\d)\1*$

  • Groups of zeroes:
    ^\d{3}00
    ^\d{5}0*$

  • Sequences:
    ^0?123456789?$
    ^9?876543210?$

Putting it all together:

^(?!(\d)\1*$)
 (?!\d{3}00)(?!\d{5}0*$)
 (?!0?123456789?$)(?!9?876543210?$)
 \d{9}$
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thanks Aaz - let me try - i'm sure it'll work. –  CocaCola Mar 19 '11 at 1:41
    
Aaz - your regex expression worked in VB.NET. now i need to use the same in Javascript too -- i tried the following --------------------var txt = document.getElementById('<%= txtSSN.ClientId %>'); var textValue = parseInt(txt.value); var regSSN = new RegExp("^(?!(\d)\1*$)(?!\d{3}00)(?!\d{5}0*$)(?!0?123456789?$)(?!0?987654321?$)\d‌​{9}$"); alert(regSSN.test(textValue)); ----- i get a FALSE for any 9 digit i eneter. did i miss on something ? –  CocaCola Mar 24 '11 at 1:39
    
@CocaCola – If you use RegExp you need to escape every backslash: r = new RegExp("^\\d{9}$"), but actually it's better to just use the language regex syntax r = /^\d{9}$/. –  aaz Mar 24 '11 at 10:22
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Everything but your "cannot be sequential" rule, which I don't understand.

^(?!(\d)\1+$)\d{3}(?!0{2})\d{2}(?!0{4})\d{4}$

Break-down:

^         # start-of-string
(?!       # negative look-ahead (not followed by)
  (\d)    #   a digit, store in group 1
  \1+$    #   the contents for group 1, repeated until end-of-string
)         # end negative look-ahead
\d{3}     # three digits
(?!       # negative look-ahead (not followed by)
  0{2}    #   two consecutive zeros 
)         # end negative look-ahead
\d{2}     # two digits
(?!       # negative look-ahead (not followed by) 
  0{4}    #   four consecutive zeros
)         # end negative look-ahead
\d{4}     # four digits
$         # end-of-string

That being said, the above is a good reason to use a dedicated function for this task instead of a regex.

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Tomalak - we could break up the pattern match into 2 parts. The first part, is what u already suggested - "^(?!(\d)\1+$)\d{3}(?!0{2})\d{2}(?!0{4})\d{4}$ ". for the second part - the 9 digits which would not be sequential, which for the time being is restricted to the following four i.e. cannot the following 4 sequences -- 012345678 or 123456789 or 987654321 or 098765432. Please let me know, if i wouldnt have to hard code them(the above mentioned 4 sequences). –  CocaCola Mar 19 '11 at 1:37
    
@CocaCola: Yes, that would be possible. But it would end up looking very much like @Tim's solution, I suggest you take that one. –  Tomalak Mar 19 '11 at 5:01
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