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I've seen := used in several code samples, but never with an accompanying explanation. It's not exactly possible to google its use without knowing the proper name for it.

What does it do?

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In what language? –  Beta Mar 17 '11 at 20:17
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You normally use := when you define something, to separate it from regular variable changes.. What programming language are we talking about? –  svens Mar 17 '11 at 20:18
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PL/SQL it is for assignment. But given a different language, that answer isn't guarenteed to hold true - so which languages was the example in? –  Andrew Mar 17 '11 at 20:18
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To google something like this, spell it out and enclose it in quotes, like so: "colon equals" –  Intelekshual Mar 17 '11 at 20:20
    
I think Pascal's got this operator ! –  David Sebastian Sep 30 '13 at 15:08
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7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equals_sign#In_computer_programming

In computer programming languages, the equals sign typically denotes either a boolean operator to test equality of values (e.g. as in Pascal or Eiffel), which is consistent with the symbol's usage in mathematics, or an assignment operator (e.g. as in C-like languages). Languages making the former choice often use a colon-equals (:=) or ≔ to denote their assignment operator. Languages making the latter choice often use a double equals sign (==) to denote their boolean equality operator.

Note: I found this by searching for colon equals operator

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well, i found THIS post by searching for the same. –  Dementic Apr 3 at 15:09
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It's the assignment operator in Pascal and is often used in proofs and pseudo-code. It's the same thing as = in C-dialect languages.

Historically, computer science papers used = for equality comparisons and for assignments. Pascal used := to stand in for the hard-to-type left arrow. C went a different direction and instead decided on the = and == operators.

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In the statically typed language Go := is initialization and assignment in one step. It is done to allow for interpreted-like creation of variables in a compiled language.

// Creates and assigns
answer := 42

// Creates and assigns
var answer = 42
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Some language uses := to act as the assignment operator.

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like postgresql –  TigOldBitties Oct 19 '11 at 19:21
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Well... It's name is "colon equals." You could even tack on "operator" at the end. However, knowing what language you're using would be helpful.

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This is old (pascal) syntax for the assignment operator. It would be used like so:

a := 45;

It may be in other languages as well, probably in a similar use.

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In a lot of CS books, it's used as the assignment operator, to differentiate from the equality operator =. In a lot of high level languages, though, assignment is = and equality is ==.

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