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Hey, I have a Silverlight app that connects to a WCF service and I'm catching errors using the event args like this:

private void GetContainersCompleted(object sender, GetContainersCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Error != null)
    {
        // show some generic message
    }
    else
    {
        // process
    }
}

How can I determine what kind of error it is? service is down, network is unavailable, etc.

Thanks

Update:

The ones I'm interested in are connection and network exceptions, here's what I ended up doing:

private void GetContainersCompleted(object sender, GetContainersCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Error != null)
    {
        if (e.Error.InnerException is EndpointNotFoundException ||
            e.Error.InnerException is CommunicationException ||
            e.Error.InnerException is SecurityException)
        {
            // show connection error message
        }
        else
        {
            // show generic error message
        }
    }
    else
    {
        // process
    }
}

Any recommendations?

Thanks

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Try to set serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" inside web.config and add to the app.xaml the code WebRequest.RegisterPrefix("http://", WebRequestCreator.ClientHttp); I didn't try this solution, so I don't know whether it works. –  vorrtex Mar 17 '11 at 20:28
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should turn on .NET WCF tracing on your server in your development environment. The WCF exceptions are frequently not helpful. This has been the only way that I have found to track down WCF issues. Especially things like the message being too large, cyclic references in data contracts, etc. I'm not sure if you can turn this on at the client level as I'm not familiar with Silverlight. Although if it can be done in the svc, it can probably be done in code also.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733025.aspx

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+1 as this is the correct way to go in the long run –  Bojan Skrchevski Mar 17 '11 at 20:44
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Try to put it in a try catch block and examine the InnerException property of the exception.

try
{
      // var something = e.Result
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
      if (ex.InnerException != null)
      {
           Log.Write(LogTypes.ERROR, "\nInner exception:\n" + ex.InnerException.StackTrace
                                       + "\nex = " + ex.InnerException.Message);
      }
}
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Wrong place to put the try...catch. By then the error's already come through. And, unless you're doing something else that may cause exception, this won't catch the initial problem. The place where the contract is established and the Async call is made is where the Try...Catch belongs. (IMHO) –  Brad Christie Mar 17 '11 at 20:33
    
@Brad - What you are saying solves only one part of the problem...when you make the async call to the service. What about when you can actually make the call but the WCF returns an error? You are not going to be able to catch that exception where the async call is made. What he is actually asking is how to read the errors on async call complete. –  Bojan Skrchevski Mar 17 '11 at 20:43
    
I guess what I'm saying is by the time the event is returned, and e.Error is populated, there's nothing to "Catch". The error is self-contained in a variable, not thrown within the event code block. You could check if (e.Error is EndPointNotFoundException) [pseudo-code], but there's nothing to catch. -- At least that's my understanding of it. –  Brad Christie Mar 17 '11 at 20:47
    
@Brad: Oh, I see now what you are trying to say by: "The error is self-contained in a variable, not thrown within the event code block.". Maybe the above code sample was not clear enough but the exception will be thrown if you try to get e.Result –  Bojan Skrchevski Mar 17 '11 at 20:55
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I'm not 100% sure if this is relevant to what you're asking, but...

In an HTTP WCF service, when you throw an exception on the server, the HTTP status code of the response is 500, indicating an error. In a standard .NET client using WCF, this doesn't make any kind of difference, but in Silverlight running in the browser it does - the browser partially handles the error (that's a hand-wavy description; I don't know exactly what goes on) and what ends up getting passed to Silverlight is a generic error that doesn't have any information in it.

The way around this is to change the status code of the repsonse before it leaves the server. See here.

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This CP Link has the exact post related to your query

"For WCF services, we have what's known as Faults. Simply putting it, instead of throwing an Exception in a service, we throw a special FaulException which the WCF Dispatcher handles and wraps up into our response message. This, when received by our client, gets unwrapped and thrown to the calling client method.

If we want to send extra info along with our fault, we just have to create a serializable class (using either the [Serializable] or [DataContract] attribute), and then throw the generic FaulException (where T is our serializable class) and send our class into the constructor. For the client to catch this unique exception, a [FaultContractAttribute(typeof(T))] (where T is our serializable class) must be declared above the operation contract that may throw this fault. The client proxy created by WCF will read the fault header in the returning message and try to desirialize it into a generic FaultException matching the type we defined in the contract's FaultContractAttribute."

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