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I ran into what seems to be a silly issue with some Javascript:

go = function () {
    alert("Go!");
}

$(function () {
    go();
});

When the page loads I get an error:

Webpage error details

User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; .NET4.0C; .NET4.0E; .NAP 1.1) Timestamp: Thu, 17 Mar 2011 20:18:03 UTC

Message: Object doesn't support this property or method Line: 1 Char: 1 Code: 0 URI: http://localhost:61710/Scripts/number.js

When I change the go initializer to this:

function go() {
    alert("Go!");
}

...everything works just fine.

What am I missing? Also, is there a reason to use one form of function initializer over the other?

Edit: I get this error when I run the code in an instance of IE8 using the built-in Visual Studio web server (Start without Debugging). When I run the code in a separate instance of IE8 without Visual Studio, it works just fine. Perhaps Visual Studio forces IE to use stricter JS compiler settings?

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can you post what browser you are using? –  Neal Mar 17 '11 at 20:26
    
Your original works for me: jsfiddle.net/Xz3s5 on IE8, FF3.3.6, Chrome 10.0.648.151, and Opera 10.63. –  tvanfosson Mar 17 '11 at 20:36
    
I'm using IE8. See the user agent section of the error details. –  Chad Levy Mar 17 '11 at 20:38
    
Looks like I only get the error when the IE8 instance is attached to Visual Studio. –  Chad Levy Mar 17 '11 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You should declare the variable first:

var go = function () {
    alert("Go!");
}

One reason to use this form is that it can help and avoid polluting the global namespace with your functions (see an example of this notion here).

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s/need/should/ is more technically correct. It should (and does) work without using var to scope it. Of course, if you use var in the outermost scope, it doesn't really make much difference. –  tvanfosson Mar 17 '11 at 20:33

The difference (and may help you decide which is better over another) is that

go = function () {
    alert("Go!");
}

is defined at parse-time whereas

function go() {
    alert("Go!");
}

is defined at run-time.

P.S., it works for me, however you may need to do:

var go = ... 

rather than

go = ...
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+1 for the parse-time vs run-time thing. That answered an ongoing issue I've had with the order in which I initialize and call my functions. –  Chad Levy Mar 17 '11 at 21:01

work fine for me:

http://jsfiddle.net/vEKgX/

although try this instead:

var go = function () {
    alert("Go!");
}

$(go);
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