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I have recently (e.g. just now) upgraded to XCode 4, and I like it overall, however, there is one thing that annoys me.

When I write code like this:

 if (self = [super init])
 {
      ...
 }

It gives me an 'issue': Using the result of an assignment as a condition without parentheses

How can I suppress this warning, as It underlines all the text in red, making me think that there is a critical error. As I am a somewhat seasoned Objective-C coder, I really don't want to change my practices and add extra parentheses around my init statements.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can either put an additional set of parentheses in the if statement

if ((self = [super init])) {
    ...
}

Or, you can do as the new templates do.

self = [super init];
if(self) {
    ...
}
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Still, is there anyway to suppress the warning? –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 17 '11 at 20:31
    
@Richard - Turn off warnings in XCode preferences. That is the only way, AFAIK. –  Mahesh Mar 17 '11 at 20:39
    
Ok.. I definitely don't want to do that. Thanks for the input though. –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 17 '11 at 21:50

I found the answer to this question here: if(self = [super init]) - LLVM warning! How are you dealing with it?

Which prescribes adding the "-Wno-idiomatic-parentheses" flag in the building settings. Which did the trick for me.

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You can uncheck the 'Missing Braces and Parentheses' in Build settings (under 'GCC 4.2 Warnings' if you use GCC4.2 or LLVM GCC4.2).

This is equivalent to the answer linked by aeprius, which works with LLVM 2.0, but not with GCC 4.2 (tested).

I understand that this warning is now turned on by default to avoid the confusion between assignment and testing for equality.

As Bavarious noted here, if(self=[super init]){...} is idiomatic in Objective-C. The warning was turned off by default In XCode 3.x and it would appear that migrated projects get the 'new default' automatically; pity to get all these warnings on migrated projects.

At least reverting the warning won't making coding less safe than it used to be in XCode 3.x.

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Double parenthesize it.

if ((self = [super init]))

It's just making sure you really know what you're doing.

I'm unsure if there is any way to silence the actual warning in XC4, as it isn't a compiler warning.

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I know, but I never had that problem before, and notice that in the question that I said I didn't want to do that. I really want to suppress the warning –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 17 '11 at 20:30
2  
The warning is however appropriate. It will not produce a warning if you are explicit (proper).. that is the order of operations will evaluate the (self = [super init]) as a simple assignment with the if (...) being evaluated in a second pass against a var being null or not. This is why the warning disappears when you place the extra set of parens inside the conditional. If you ever make an assignment inside a conditional, this is the best practice. –  Mark Grimes Mar 17 '11 at 21:15

change it to if((self = [super init])) this shows the compiler that it is intentional.

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You can either put another set of parens around self = [super init] or you can set self before the conditional and then evaluate as if (self).

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I usually do this.

self = [super init];

if(self) {

}

This way, nothing and no one will ever be confused.

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use if(self == [self init]).....since you are using a assignment operator " = " in the place of condition .... if statement checks the condition .... n you are assingng a value out there... use "==" instead of "=" ...

thanx.....

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Sorry man, you probably don't understand the objective-c idiom for that. You are assigning because you are initializing the object, not a comparison. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 6 '11 at 18:33

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