Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a piece of existing code that I'm having problems understanding.

I generally don't like shorthand because it requires config changes, and is harder for me to read. For this reason I'm not particularly familiar with it. The existing code was written by someone who loves shorthand.

When I encountered this:

if($type == 'a') $type = 'Type A';
else if($type == 'b') $type = 'Type B';
else if($type == 'c') $type = 'Type C';

I read it as a simple if, and else if string. I converted it to:

if($type == 'a') {
  $type = 'Type A';
} else if($type == 'b') {
  $type = 'Type B';
} else if($type == 'c') {
  $type = 'Type C';
}

I thought that was pretty straightforward, however I'm getting different results in practice. What's the difference between the two snippets above?

share|improve this question
    
What results are you getting? –  Neil Knight Mar 17 '11 at 21:04
    
The two code snippets are identical. –  Matthew Mar 17 '11 at 21:08
    
btw, if your code above is a good representation of your actual code, you may want to look into a switch statement –  Erik Mar 17 '11 at 21:09
    
I am getting $type set to the incorrect value, thanks everyone for the help, I must have an error elsewhere. –  Jeff Mar 17 '11 at 21:16
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

They're absolutely identical, the difference must be elsewhere.

Is that a copy/paste of the before and after code?

I agree with anubhava though, I'd tend to convert that to a switch case for clarity:

switch ($type) {
  case 'a':
    $type = 'Type A';
    break;

  case 'b':
    $type = 'Type B';
    break;

  case 'c':
    $type = 'Type C';
    break;

  default:
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification and recommendation, and I agree I should probably change that out to a switch. –  Jeff Mar 17 '11 at 21:17
add comment

They should be identical. I'll make a test file, but I don't think it will bring change to that fact...

Woah, made a testfile:

<?php
$type = 'a';

if($type == 'a') $type = 'Type A';
else if($type == 'b') $type = 'Type B';
else if($type == 'c') $type = 'Type C';
echo $type . "\n";


$type = 'b';

if($type == 'a') $type = 'Type A';
else if($type == 'b') $type = 'Type B';
else if($type == 'c') $type = 'Type C';
echo $type . "\n";


$type = 'c';

if($type == 'a') $type = 'Type A';
else if($type == 'b') $type = 'Type B';
else if($type == 'c') $type = 'Type C';
echo $type . "\n";


$type = 'a';

if($type == 'a') {
  $type = 'Type A';
} else if($type == 'b') {
  $type = 'Type B';
} else if($type == 'c') {
  $type = 'Type C';
}
echo $type . "\n";

$type = 'b';

if($type == 'a') {
  $type = 'Type A';
} else if($type == 'b') {
  $type = 'Type B';
} else if($type == 'c') {
  $type = 'Type C';
}

echo $type . "\n";
$type = 'c';

if($type == 'a') {
  $type = 'Type A';
} else if($type == 'b') {
  $type = 'Type B';
} else if($type == 'c') {
  $type = 'Type C';
}
echo $type . "\n";

and the results where indeed the same.

Type A
Type B
Type C
Type A
Type B
Type C
share|improve this answer
    
I hope no-one saw that before edit ;). The code is the same :) –  Nanne Mar 17 '11 at 21:10
    
Excellent, thank you! I must have an error somewhere else causing my strange results. –  Jeff Mar 17 '11 at 21:18
add comment

is $type returning an undesirable? if it is, I would :

if($type == 'a') {
  $type = 'Type A';
} else if($type == 'b') {
  $type = 'Type B';
} else if($type == 'c') {
  $type = 'Type C';
} else {
 $type = 'Other Type';
}

But I'm in total agreement with the above guys, actually you should be translating it as:

switch ($type) {
  case 'a':
    $type = 'Type A';
    break;

  case 'b':
    $type = 'Type B';
    break;

  case 'c':
    $type = 'Type C';
    break;

  default:
    $type = 'Other Type';
    break;
}

That way you can always see what the undesirable data will be, depending on the circumstances I'd always set a default, esp in dev mode.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you first need php switch case to simplify above code.

Although I must mention that I didn't find any code differences 2 versions of your code. It is jsut that switch case makes it more readable than many if, else if, else if, statements.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the recommendation. –  Jeff Mar 17 '11 at 21:18
add comment

they are identical, the error is elsewhere.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This isn't actually shorthand syntax. This is just an if/else if/else if where each section only has one statement and thus doesn't need a {} set.

It's a little clearer when formatted with line breaks:

if($type == 'a')
    $type = 'Type A';
else if($type == 'b')
    $type = 'Type B';
else if($type == 'c')
    $type = 'Type C';
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification. –  Jeff Mar 17 '11 at 21:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.