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I have an HTML form with a table inside it. The code is as follows:

My Code:

    <html>
    <head></head>

    <body>
        <form onsubmit="" id="form1" action="" method="post" name="form1" style="position: relative; background-color: green;">
    <table style="width: 908px; background-color: yellow; position: absolute; left: 350px; top: 350px;" border="0">
        <tbody><tr>
            <td colspan="3" align="center"><span style="color: Red; font-size: medium;" id="error"><br></span></td>
        </tr><tr>
            <td style="width: 300px;" align="right"><input style="font-size: medium; width: 35%;" tabindex="-1" id="btnReset" onclick="" value="Reset" name="btnReset" type="button"></td><td style="width: 300px;" align="center"><img style="border-width: 0px;" src=""></td><td style="width: 300px;" align="left"><input style="font-size: medium; width: 35%;" id="btnNext" onclick="" value="Next" name="btnNext" type="submit"></td>
        </tr><tr>
            <td></td><td style="width: 34%;" align="center">For assistance please see <a href="">Help</a> page<br><br></td><td></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

    <input value="" id="StoredProcedure" name="StoredProcedure" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="SubmitFile" name="SubmitFile" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="" name="" type=""><input value="" id="" name="" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="" name="" type="hidden">

    </form>
    </body>
    </html>

I'm trying make the table to move like the embedded tag does in the example given on this tutorial site. The code for the specific example I'm trying to emulate is as follows:

Example Code:

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css" media="screen">

#div-1 {
 position:relative;
}
#div-1a {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 right:0;
 width:200px;
}


#example {
 float:right;
}

#example div {
}

#div-before, #div-after {
 background-color:#88d;
 color:#000;
}
#div-1 {
 width:400px;
 background-color:#000;
 color:#fff;
}
#div-1-padding {
 padding:10px;
}
#div-1a {
 background-color:#d33;
 color:#fff;
}
#div-1b {
 background-color:#3d3;
 color:#fff;
}
#div-1c {
 background-color:#33d;
 color:#fff;
}
#example div p {
 margin:0 .25em;
 padding:.25em 0;
}
#description {
 float:left;
 width:40%;
}
pre {
 padding:1em;
 border:1px dashed #aaa;
 background:#fafafa;
}
p {
 margin:0.5em 0;
}
h3 {
 color:#999;
}

.job {
margin-top:1em;
border:1px solid #aaa;
padding:1em;
background:#ddd;
}

</style>
</head>

<body>
<div id="example">

<div id="div-before">
<p>id = div-before</p>
</div>

<div id="div-1">
<div id="div-1-padding">

<p>id = div-1</p>

<div id="div-1a">
<p>id = div-1a</p>
<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Integer pretium dui sit amet felis. Integer sit amet diam. Phasellus ultrices viverra velit.</p>
</div>

<div id="div-1b">
<p>id = div-1b</p>
<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Integer pretium dui sit amet felis. Integer sit amet diam. Phasellus ultrices viverra velit. Nam mattis, arcu ut bibendum commodo, magna nisi tincidunt tortor, quis accumsan augue ipsum id lorem.</p>
</div>

<div id="div-1c"><p>id = div-1c</p></div>

</div></div><!-- /id=div-1-padding /id=div-1 -->

<div id="div-after">
<p>id = div-after</p>
</div>

</div><!-- /id=example -->

</body>
</html>

To describe what I'm trying to accomplish, notice how when you re-size the browser to make it smaller, the Example code's main div and it's children will move with the browser, but still stay in proportion when it can no longer fit in the browser window; whereas, with My Code, the children of the form, i.e. the inner table, will remain in the same spot even when I re-size the browser. I want it to move like the example, I'm confused since my intuition tells me that since the table is embedded in the form, even though it's absolutely positioned within the form it should move since it's positioned relative to it's parent element only and not the browser window. Is there something I'm missing?

Note:

To avoid confusion, in My Code, I added background colors for my personal reference only, they can be ignored.

UPDATE:

Here are links to demos of each page: EXAMPLE DEMO, MY CODE DEMO

UPDATE (Solution): Ok, I was able to resolve it. What I did was wrap the entire form in a div tag and gave it the following styles: position: relative; background-color: green; width: 910px; margin: 0px auto;. I also removed the form styles and changed the table styling to the following: width: 908px; background-color: yellow; position: absolute; left: 0px; top: 350px;. This moves everything to the center and mirrors behavior described in the example code. Here is the modified code for future reference. I'm still curious though, why wouldn't this work when the styles were applied to the form?? Is there some fundamental difference in how styling is handled between div and form tags??? Thanks for all your suggestions.

<html>
        <head></head>

        <body>
            <div style="position: relative; background-color: green; width: 610px; margin: 0px auto;">
            <form onsubmit="" id="form1" action="" method="post" name="form1">
        <table style="width: 908px; background-color: yellow; position: absolute; left: 0px; top: 350px;" border="0">
            <tbody><tr>
                <td colspan="3" align="center"><span style="color: Red; font-size: medium;" id="error"><br></span></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td style="width: 300px;" align="right"><input style="font-size: medium; width: 35%;" tabindex="-1" id="btnReset" onclick="" value="Reset" name="btnReset" type="button"></td><td style="width: 300px;" align="center"><img style="border-width: 0px;" src=""></td><td style="width: 300px;" align="left"><input style="font-size: medium; width: 35%;" id="btnNext" onclick="" value="Next" name="btnNext" type="submit"></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td></td><td style="width: 34%;" align="center">For assistance please see <a href="">Help</a> page<br><br></td><td></td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>

        <input value="" id="StoredProcedure" name="StoredProcedure" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="SubmitFile" name="SubmitFile" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="" name="" type=""><input value="" id="" name="" type="hidden"><input value="False" id="" name="" type="hidden">

        </form>
            </div>
        </body>
        </html>
share|improve this question
1  
Would it be possible for us to see a live example? It's really hard to tell just from code. Especially as browsers do weird stuff with css. –  Nico Burns Mar 17 '11 at 21:16
    
No problem, I added links to demos on JSFiddle.com –  kingrichard2005 Mar 17 '11 at 21:25
    
I'm not getting the question. What exactly is wrong? –  Blender Mar 17 '11 at 21:27
    
It's ok, I already resolved it. I figured it would be a minor issue, to see what I'm describing it's better to copy the code to a text file, save it as html and run it from there. You can't see what's really going on in JSFiddle. –  kingrichard2005 Mar 17 '11 at 21:50
2  
Instead of posting the solution as an update to your question, you can actually answer your own question. This way, the question won't show up as unresolved. –  Jimmy Mar 17 '11 at 22:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[...] since it's positioned relative to it's parent element only and not the browser window. Is there something I'm missing?

Yes.

You'll want to read about absolute positioning: (from w3schools)

An absolute position element is positioned relative to the first parent element that has a position other than static.

So an absolutely positioned element is not positioned relative to its parent, but the first non-statically positioned ancestor element.

What is static positioning? The position CSS property has 4 possible values:

  • Static
  • Relative
  • Absolute
  • Fixed

Static is the default positioning. So the first ancestor element which has a value for position other than static (which is the default) is the one your absolutely positioned element will position itself in... not necessarily the parent.

In your code, you just needed to add a position:relative; to the <form> element. You don't need to wrap the <form> in a <div>. That's excessive. In your final solution there's nothing the <div> is doing which the <form> can't - they are both block level elements.

share|improve this answer
    
... and while I'm at it, don't use the style attribute! –  Richard JP Le Guen Mar 19 '11 at 13:11
    
Rolled back an edit. There is no inherit value for the position property: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/position –  Richard JP Le Guen Dec 9 '13 at 19:46

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