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If I have a function that takes a reference to an object. How do I cast the parameter to avoid a type mismatch?

Dictionary<string, string> mySettings = new Dictionary<string, string>();
.
.
saveSettings(ref mySettings);
.
.
void saveSettings(ref object)
{
}

The call to saveSettings results in the following error message:

cannot convert from 'ref Dictionary' to 'ref object'

I'm not looking for a workaround, I've done that, I would like to know if this direct approach is possible.

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3  
why would saveSettings() take a ref to an object? What are you trying to achieve? I'm sure there's a better solution once you can clarify. –  BrokenGlass Mar 17 '11 at 21:27
    
void saveSettings (ref object theObject) would be the correction –  AlanKley Mar 17 '11 at 21:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
var objectMySettings = mySettings as object;
if (objectMySettings != null)
    saveSettings(ref objectMySettings);
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The generics solution is a good recommendation. Since this addresses my specific question, I chose it as the preferred answer. –  AlanKley Mar 24 '11 at 15:10
    
I must say that this way reference to mySettings object won't be passed to objectMySettings, so if you assing null to objectMySettings in saveSettings method, mySettings object will still have value, it won't be nulled and hence real ref behavior is lost –  Vajda Mar 24 '12 at 18:02

Something like this:

static void Main()
{

   Dictionary<string, string> mySettings = new Dictionary<string, string>();
   object o = mySettings;
   SaveSettings(ref o);
   // o now has an item.
}

static void SaveSettings(ref object o)
{
    var d = o as Dictionary<string, string>;
    d.Add("Some", "String");
}

EDIT Some debugging output. enter image description here

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See my comment to HelloWorld. Your solution does not update mySettings, which is what I need it to do. But thanks. –  AlanKley Mar 17 '11 at 21:37
    
It does indeed update mySettings. –  Mikael Östberg Mar 17 '11 at 21:41
    
Yes it does Mike. Applying it to my code didn't, I'll have to investigate that. Thanks for your solution. –  AlanKley Mar 17 '11 at 21:58

If save settings is taking multiple types, why not use a generic instead? Esp if they share a common interface.

void saveSettings<T>(T obj);
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Thanks, I'll try that. What if I pass 2 parameters, the first parameter is a filename (string) and only the second parameter needs to be specified as generic? What's the syntax for that? –  AlanKley Mar 17 '11 at 21:44
    
void saveSettings<T>(string filename, T obj) –  Ryan Bennett Mar 18 '11 at 14:02
void saveSettings(ref object)

The definition of saveSettings is malformed. You need an identifier after "ref object". But I'd make the "ref object" a Dictionary instead.

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Redefining the parameter to a specific type would limit the function. But that IS my current workaround. –  AlanKley Mar 17 '11 at 21:35
    
Perhaps you should use a generic like another poster mentioned. –  Frank Hale Mar 17 '11 at 21:37

Do it this way:

 protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> mySettings = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    saveSettings(mySettings);
}

void saveSettings( Dictionary<string, string> Settings)
{
}
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