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I'm using a BooleanToVisibilityConverter in WPF to bind the Visibility property of a control to a boolean. This works fine, but I'd like one of the controls to hide if the boolean is true, and show if it's false.

Is this possible?

Thanks, Andy

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note: as of beta 4 - silverlight does not include BooleanToVisibility - so you'll need to implement it yourself anyway –  Simon_Weaver Dec 21 '09 at 3:52

11 Answers 11

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just implement your own implementation of IValueConverter. A sample implementation is at

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.data.ivalueconverter.aspx

In your Convert method, just have it return the values you'd like instead of the defaults.

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1  
I created a reusable BoolVisibilityConverter that lets you choose whether to display on true or false. I also added a property for selecting whether to collapse or hide the control. –  Josh G Feb 11 '09 at 16:00

Instead of inverting, you can achieve the same goal by using a generic IValueConverter implementation that can convert a Boolean value to configurable target values for true and false. Below is one such implementation:

public class BooleanConverter<T> : IValueConverter
{
    public BooleanConverter(T trueValue, T falseValue)
    {
        True = trueValue;
        False = falseValue;
    }

    public T True { get; set; }
    public T False { get; set; }

    public virtual object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value is bool && ((bool) value) ? True : False;
    }

    public virtual object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value is T && EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals((T) value, True);
    }
}

Next, subclass it where T is Visibility:

public sealed class BooleanToVisibilityConverter : BooleanConverter<Visibility>
{
    public BooleanToVisibilityConverter() : 
        base(Visibility.Visible, Visibility.Collapsed) {}
}

Finally, this is how you could use BooleanToVisibilityConverter above in XAML and configure it to, for example, use Collapsed for true and Visible for false:

<Application.Resources>
    <app:BooleanToVisibilityConverter 
        x:Key="BooleanToVisibilityConverter" 
        True="Collapsed" 
        False="Visible" />
</Application.Resources>

This inversion is useful when you want to bind to a Boolean property named IsHidden as opposed IsVisible.

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6  
Great reusable solution! –  Josh M. Mar 20 '11 at 18:51
    
Very useful code thank you! –  Carter Feb 13 '12 at 17:37
    
I might be missing something, but don't you just need a negated property ? stackoverflow.com/questions/534575/… –  OscarRyz Aug 3 '12 at 17:42
1  
@OscarRyz: With more complex UIs, that starts to add a lot of really annoying clutter to the view models, not to mention another property you theoretically have to unit test in order to maintain code coverage. View models shouldn't have to get that close to the implementation details of the view, otherwise you might as well just have Visibility properties in your view model. –  Aaronaught Nov 4 '12 at 21:27
using System;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Data;

public sealed class BooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var flag = false;
        if (value is bool)
        {
            flag = (bool)value;
        }
        else if (value is bool?)
        {
            var nullable = (bool?)value;
            flag = nullable.GetValueOrDefault();
        }
        if (parameter != null)
        {
            if (bool.Parse((string)parameter))
            {
                flag = !flag;
            }
        }
        if (flag)
        {
            return Visibility.Visible;
        }
        else
        {
            return Visibility.Collapsed;
        }
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var back = ((value is Visibility) && (((Visibility)value) == Visibility.Visible));
        if (parameter != null)
        {
            if ((bool)parameter)
            {
                back = !back;
            }
        }
        return back;
    }
}

and then pass a true or false as the ConverterParameter

       <Grid.Visibility>
                <Binding Path="IsYesNoButtonSetVisible" Converter="{StaticResource booleanToVisibilityConverter}" ConverterParameter="true"/>
        </Grid.Visibility>
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Excellent! Works great. –  Matt Aug 4 '10 at 20:33
3  
At the else if (value is bool?) part, ReSharper tells me "Expression is always false". Also, the if (flag) part can be rewritten more concisely as return flag ? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;. –  Danilo Bargen Jan 6 '12 at 21:08
1  
I might be missing something, but don't you just need a negated property ? stackoverflow.com/questions/534575/… –  OscarRyz Aug 3 '12 at 17:43
    
var nullable = (bool?)value; flag = nullable.GetValueOrDefault(); can be made much shorter and simple: flag = (bool?)value ?? false; –  ANeves Feb 25 at 15:04

Write your own is the best solution for now. Here is an example of a Converter that can do both way Normal and Inverted. If you have any problems with this just ask.

[ValueConversion(typeof(bool), typeof(Visibility))]
public class InvertableBooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
    enum Parameters
    {
        Normal, Inverted
    }

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType,
                          object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var boolValue = (bool)value;
        var direction = (Parameters)Enum.Parse(typeof(Parameters), (string)parameter);

        if(direction == Parameters.Inverted)
            return !boolValue? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;

        return boolValue? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType,
        object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return null;
    }
}


<UserControl.Resources>
  <Converters:InvertableBooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="_Converter"/>
</UserControl.Resources>

<Button Visibility="{Binding IsRunning, Converter={StaticResource _Converter}, ConverterParameter=Inverted}">Start</Button>
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2  
Nice :-) My favorite –  Karsten Jun 15 '11 at 13:27
2  
Just wonding one thing. The xaml code "Binding IsRunning", where is the sourcode or the value for the object "IsRunning"? –  FullMetalGame Aug 10 '11 at 8:27
    
IsRunning is a property on my viewmodel. The context of this code is long but the short of it is that I needed to have somethings hidden when I was running some calculation and other things not hidden. I created this converter to make it so I would not have to have multiple properties on my viewmodel. –  Michael Hohlios Aug 25 '11 at 17:37
1  
I like the example, however wouldnt the line: var str = (string)value; give you a Bool to String error?? –  JamesM Nov 3 '11 at 11:16
1  
In fact shouldnt it be something like: return str == "True" ? Visibility.Visible: Visibility.Collapsed; as otherwise your only evaluating the value/null and not the actual booleans True/False state? –  JamesM Nov 3 '11 at 11:43

There's also the WPF Converters project on Codeplex. In their documentation they say you can use their MapConverter to convert from Visibility enumeration to bool

<Label>
    <Label.Visible>
        <Binding Path="IsVisible">
            <Binding.Converter>
                <con:MapConverter>
                    <con:Mapping From="True" To="{x:Static Visibility.Visible}"/>
                    <con:Mapping From="False" To="{x:Static Visibility.Hidden}"/>
                </con:MapConverter>
            </Binding.Converter>
        </Binding>
    </Label.Visible>
</Label>
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1  
WPF Converters now includes a BooleanToVisibilityConverter that can be reversed. –  vinod Mar 27 '13 at 7:38

Or the real lazy mans way, just make use of what is there already and flip it:

public class InverseBooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
    private BooleanToVisibilityConverter _converter = new BooleanToVisibilityConverter();

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var result = _converter.Convert(value, targetType, parameter, culture) as Visibility?;
        return result == Visibility.Collapsed ? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var result = _converter.ConvertBack(value, targetType, parameter, culture) as bool?;
        return result == true ? false : true;
    }
}
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I just did a post on this. I used a similar idea as Michael Hohlios did. Only, I used Properties instead of using the "object parameter".

Binding Visibility to a bool value in WPF

Using Properties makes it more readable, in my opinion.

<local:BoolToVisibleOrHidden x:Key="BoolToVisConverter" Collapse="True" Reverse="True" />
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Just a follow-up on my own comment. If you use Properties, you have to create a separate object if you want to create to converters, one that is Reverse and one not. If you use parameters, you can use one object for multiple items, but it can be confusing if you don't pay attention. So there are pros and cons to both. –  Rhyous Jul 25 '11 at 19:24

Write your own convert.

public class ReverseBooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
   {
       // your converter code here
   }
}
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I know this is dated, but, you don't need to re-implement anything.

What I did was to negate the value on the property like this:

<!-- XAML code -->
<StackPanel Name="x"  Visibility="{Binding    Path=Specials, ElementName=MyWindow, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}"></StackPanel>    
<StackPanel Name="y"  Visibility="{Binding Path=NotSpecials, ElementName=MyWindow, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}"></StackPanel>        

....

//Code behind
public bool Specials
{
    get { return (bool) GetValue(SpecialsProperty); }
    set
    {
        NotSpecials= !value; 
        SetValue(SpecialsProperty, value);
    }
}

public bool NotSpecials
{
    get { return (bool) GetValue(NotSpecialsProperty); }
    set { SetValue(NotSpecialsProperty, value); }
}

And it works just fine!

Am I missing something?

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2  
You think this is an easier solution, and for a single property this might even be the case (it's not reusable for multiple properties, you have to implement it for every one). I feel this is the wrong place for the implementation though, as it has nothing to do with the viewmodel/codeBehind and everything with the view. –  adabyron Mar 6 '13 at 14:26

A simple one way version which can be used like this:

Visibility="{Binding IsHidden, Converter={x:Static Ui:Converters.BooleanToVisibility}, ConverterParameter=true}

can be implemented like this:

public class BooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
  public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
  {
    var invert = false;

    if (parameter != null)
    {
      invert = Boolean.Parse(parameter.ToString());
    }

    var booleanValue = (bool) value;

    return ((booleanValue && !invert) || (!booleanValue && invert)) 
      ? Visibility.Visible : Visibility.Collapsed;
  }

  public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }
}
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Here's one I wrote and use a lot. It uses a boolean converter parameter that indicates whether or not to invert the value and then uses XOR to perform the negation:

[ValueConversion(typeof(bool), typeof(System.Windows.Visibility))]
public class BooleanVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
{
    System.Windows.Visibility _visibilityWhenFalse = System.Windows.Visibility.Collapsed;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the <see cref="System.Windows.Visibility"/> value to use when the value is false. Defaults to collapsed.
    /// </summary>
    public System.Windows.Visibility VisibilityWhenFalse
    {
        get { return _visibilityWhenFalse; }
        set { _visibilityWhenFalse = value; }
    }

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        bool negateValue;
        Boolean.TryParse(parameter as string, out negateValue);

        bool val = negateValue ^ System.Convert.ToBoolean(value); //Negate the value using XOR
        return val ? System.Windows.Visibility.Visible : _visibilityWhenFalse;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        bool negateValue;
        Boolean.TryParse(parameter as string, out negateValue);

        if ((System.Windows.Visibility)value == System.Windows.Visibility.Visible)
            return true ^ negateValue;
        else
            return false ^ negateValue;
    }
}

Here's an XOR truth table for reference:

        XOR
        x  y  XOR
        ---------
        0  0  0
        0  1  1
        1  0  1
        1  1  0
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