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Is there an easier way to write the integer value for enum flags without having to remember EACH base 2 number (I tend to get lost after 4096)?

If I use, let's say, 2*2*2*2, will that be converted to 16 at compile time or will it be executed at run time?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted
    public enum Foo
    {
        Bar  = 1 << 0,
        Baz  = 1 << 1,
        Quux  = 1 << 2,
        Etc  = 1 << 3
    }
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+1 haven't used this method in C#, but for C and C++ I use this method a lot. (well, not for enums usually, but rather other long lists) – Earlz Mar 18 '11 at 0:09
    
Yeah it's a handy trick. I certainly brought it with me from my C++ days too :) – OJ. Mar 18 '11 at 0:10
    
Thanks! I'll probably use this from now on. – Kevin Evans Mar 18 '11 at 0:10
1  
@OJ you have to wait 3 more minutes before he can accept it :P – Earlz Mar 18 '11 at 0:18
    
How did I not know about that? :) – OJ. Mar 18 '11 at 4:06

You could use hex which is a little more intuitive.

Value1 = 0x01,
Value2 = 0x02,
Value3 = 0x04,
...

Or use bit shifts.

Value1 = 1 << 0,
Value2 = 1 << 1,
Value3 = 1 << 2,
....
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for hex method – Peter Oehlert Mar 18 '11 at 0:14

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