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Pattern patronValidity = Pattern.compile("Validity: \\[(.*?)\\]");
            Matcher matcherValidity = patronValidity.matcher(strCert);
            if(matcherValidity.find()){
                System.out.println(matcherValidity.group(1));
            }

I'm using that to scan a file but it returns no matches. Strangely, the next one does return something, but it's wrong since the left bracket remains in the info.

Pattern patronValidity = Pattern.compile("Validity: (\\[[^]]*)");
            Matcher matcherValidity = patronValidity.matcher(strCert);
            if(matcherValidity.find()){
                System.out.println(matcherValidity.group(1));
            }

This is the value I'm trying to match.

It goes from this as in the file:

Validity: [From: Thu Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2008,
               To: Sat Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2010]

To this as in the output from the second function:

[From: Thu Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2008,
               To: Sat Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2010

The first function doesn't match anything.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here you go:

Pattern patronValidity = Pattern.compile("\\[([^\\]]+)]");

That should get you what you need!

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It marks "Invalid escape sequence" –  overmann Mar 18 '11 at 0:21
    
You just need to escape the slashes - updated my answer. –  Josh M. Mar 18 '11 at 0:24
    
Thanks a bunchie. :) –  overmann Mar 18 '11 at 0:39
    
You're welcome. –  Josh M. Mar 18 '11 at 0:41

The reason your first expression doesn't work is because the . matches everything but new line characters (and possibly others). You need to compile your regex with DOTALL flag set for it to match all characters. For the second, see Josh's answer.

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Does it have to be regex? I would probably just use substringing for a problem of this kind.

String str = "Validity: [From: Thu Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2008,
               To: Sat Aug 21 10:22:08 CDT 2010]";
System.out.println(str.substring(
                     str.indexOf('[', str.indexOf("Validity: ")),
                     str.indexOf(']')+1)
                  );

This should give the wanted output and be much easier to read, update, change or extend. Also I'm not sure how much memory regex uses in Java, but for PHP they recommend the built-in string functions for this kind of work, as the regex engine is much heavier on the system, and there by also slower.

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The thing with that regex function is that it mathces that little string against a whole file. –  overmann Mar 18 '11 at 0:55
    
Using functions such as substring is absolutely NOT more extensible than a regular expression! The moment you have to do anything even remotely complex you will find yourself having to write down positions of all the important characters or even looping char-by-char through the string - it gets very messy pretty quick. I also don't find that easier to read than the regex I posted but that could be because I use them often and am used to the syntax. Don't fear the regular expression, embrace its power. –  Josh M. Mar 18 '11 at 5:02
    
@josh I never meant it was more extensible than regex, that would just be a silly statement, just that it's clearly visible what you go for and what you get without knowing regex. If you need to do something complex, regex is the way to go, but the problem in question wasn't complex at all. Keep it simple and don't embrace powers that exceed you needs ;) –  Flygenring Mar 18 '11 at 11:09
    
@overmann Well, I didn't know the format of the rest of the file or if you wanted to get any other information from the file. Could probably be made easily to suit the needs, but if regex is what you want, that's the way to go... I have updated my answer to get what you want in a file with many []'s –  Flygenring Mar 18 '11 at 11:14

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