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If I have this recursive function:

int mystery(int n) {

if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ||  n ==  2) return  n ;
 return (mystery(n-1) + mystery(n-2) + mystery(n-3))  ;
}

I am working with finding mystery(20).

How can I find out how many addition operations are carried out when calculating the function and how many invocations of mystery() there are in order to calculate mystery(20)?

I tried adding some cout statements like:

int mystery(int n) {
    if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ||  n ==  2) {
      cout << n << endl; 
      return  n ;
    }
        cout << n << endl;
    return (mystery(n-1) + mystery(n-2) + mystery(n-3))  ;
}

But I couldn't really make sense of it since there were over a thousand numbers outputted. And I don't believe those cout statements do much in the way of telling me how many addition operations are carried out and how many invocations of mystery() there are in order to calculate mystery(20)?

Thanks for any and all help!

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Well for every n > 2 that gets printed out, there are 3 additions. No? –  Falmarri Mar 18 '11 at 0:52
1  
Apart from the overhead inherent to recursions, note that the call of mystery(n-1) has already calculated values that will be re-calculated in the call of mystery(n-2), and again re-calculated in the call mystery(n-3). This implies awful, terrible performance. Read about dynamic programming. –  wilhelmtell Mar 18 '11 at 0:55
    
@wilhelmtell - My guess is that this is part of assignment where they will learn how to calculate the number of additions that happen. So using dynamic programming to get rid of them would defeat the purpose. –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 1:10
    
Interesting note: this is a Tribonacci Sequence ... gotta love the On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences :) –  D.Shawley Mar 18 '11 at 1:48
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do is to increment a global (or static global) variable.

Something like to get the number of mystery call:

int nb_of_invok = 0;
int mystery(int n)
{
  nb_of_invok++;
  ...your code here...
}

And this to get the number of additions:

int nb_of_invok = 0;
int nb_of_add = 0;
int mystery(int n)
{
  nb_of_invok++;
  if(...)return n;
  nb_of_add++;
  return(...);
}
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this is the most obvious way :) –  dagang Mar 18 '11 at 0:58
    
Thanks but how can I keep track of the number of additions, where do I place a global variable in the function to keep track of the additions? I'm not seeing how that's done? –  Ben Mar 18 '11 at 1:01
    
@Rhinoo I have updated my answer. –  Ubiquité Mar 18 '11 at 1:06
    
Awesome, it was a lot simpler than I thought, thank you ! –  Ben Mar 18 '11 at 1:13
    
@Rhinoo You're welcome. –  Ubiquité Mar 18 '11 at 1:26
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If I'm understanding you correctly... you can use a static counter variable and increment that every time you call the method. Alternatively, you can pass around a reference to the counter and just increment that.

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This is possible to figure out with math. But if you wanted to measure it empirically, you could use a static counter in the function. This logic is easy to extend to counting the number of additions as well.

int mystery(int n) {
    static int invocations = 1;

    cout << "mystery has been invoked " << invocations++ << " times.\n";
    if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ||  n ==  2) {
      return  n ;
    }
    return (mystery(n-1) + mystery(n-2) + mystery(n-3))  ;
}

You could also use a global variable. I don't like either of those solutions though. They make multi-threading hard, and they violate some important design principles. As a one-off to answer this question and then remove from your code they're fine, but what I would do if I wanted this as a permanent feature is this:

#include <iostream>

class counted_mystery {
   public:
    counted_mystery() : invocations_(0), additions_(0) { }

    unsigned int getInvocations() const { return invocations_; }
    void resetInvocations(unsigned int newval = 0) { invocations_ = newval; }

    unsigned int getAdditions() const { return additions_; }
    void resetAdditions(unsigned int newval = 0) { additions_ = newval; }

    operator ()(int n) {
        ++invocations_;
        counted_mystery &mystery = *this;

        if ( n == 0 || n == 1 ||  n ==  2) {
          return  n ;
        }
        // The code is about to perform two additions.
        additions_ += 2;
        return (mystery(n-1) + mystery(n-2) + mystery(n-3));
    }

   private:
    unsigned int count_, additions_;
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    using ::std::cout;

    counted_mystery mystery;
    mystery(20);
    cout << "mystery was called " << mystery.getCount() << " times for n == 20\n";
    return 0;
};

Figuring this out with math is an interesting problem, but likely not too hard. I think it will turn out to be exponential.

BTW, don't use endl unless that's what you mean to use. It's very slow since it forces a buffer flush whenever you use it. Use '\n'.

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Another option is to make this is method of a class which would allow use of a member variable rather than a global, and at the same time keeps the int mystery(int) interface clean.

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Declare two different static int variables to keep track of number of times invoked and number of addition operations.

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Use (and increment) a global variable. http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/variables/

I would type an example but I've got a hand injury.

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