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Using the simple example below, what is the best way to return results from multiple tables using Linq to Sql?

Say I have two tables:

Dogs: Name, Age, BreedId

Breeds: BreedId, BreedName

I want to return all dogs with their BreedName. I should get all dogs using something like this with no problems:

public IQueryable<Dog> GetDogs()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select d;
    return result;
}

But if I want dogs with breeds and try this I have problems:

public IQueryable<Dog> GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select new
                        {
                            Name = d.Name,
                            BreedName = b.BreedName
                        };
    return result;
}

Now I realize that the compiler won't let me return a set of anonymous types since it's expecting Dogs, but is there a way to return this without having to create a custom type? Or do I have to create my own class for DogsWithBreedNames and specify that type in the select? Or is there another easier way?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity, why do all the Linq examples show using anonymous types, if they don't work. Eg, this example does foreach (var cust in query) Console.WriteLine("id = {0}, City = {1}", cust.CustomerID, cust.City); –  Hot Licks Apr 8 at 18:30
    
@Hot Licks - the Customer table in those examples is an entity represented by a class. The example just doesn't appear to show the definitions of those classes. –  Jonathan S. Apr 8 at 19:37
    
Nor does it tell you that a compiler swizzle is replacing "var" with the class name. –  Hot Licks Apr 8 at 19:43

12 Answers 12

up vote 103 down vote accepted

I tend to go for this pattern:

public class DogWithBreed
{
    public Dog Dog { get; set; }
    public string BreedName  { get; set; }
}

public IQueryable<DogWithBreed> GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select new DogWithBreed()
                        {
                            Dog = d,
                            BreedName = b.BreedName
                        };
    return result;
}

It means you have an extra class, but it's quick and easy to code, easily extensible, reusable and type-safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach but now I'm not sure how to display the dog's name. If I'm binding the result to a DataGrid, can I get the properties from Dog without defining them explicitly in the DogWithBreed class or do I have to create the getter/setter for each field that I want to display? –  Jonathan S. Feb 11 '09 at 15:45
3  
Do DataGrids not allow you to specify the property as "Dog.Name"? I forget now why I hate them enough never to use them... –  teedyay Feb 11 '09 at 16:06
    
The extra class is well worth it, Thank you for solving this problem for all time! +1 –  Arjang Nov 26 '11 at 3:35
    
@JonathanS. how u did this in template column ?please tell me i am in similar situation –  rahularyansharma Jan 17 '12 at 3:55
    
Hey, I like this method of encapsulating the two classes into one. It makes it easy to work with. Not to mention creating simple classes to be used only in the current context do make it cleaner. –  Linger Apr 3 '12 at 15:19

You can return anonymous types, but it really isn't pretty.

In this case I think it would be far better to create the appropriate type. If it's only going to be used from within the type containing the method, make it a nested type.

Personally I'd like C# to get "named anonymous types" - i.e. the same behaviour as anonymous types, but with names and property declarations, but that's it.

EDIT: Others are suggesting returning dogs, and then accessing the breed name via a property path etc. That's a perfectly reasonable approach, but IME it leads to situations where you've done a query in a particular way because of the data you want to use - and that meta-information is lost when you just return IEnumerable<Dog> - the query may be expecting you to use (say) Breed rather than Ownerdue to some load options etc, but if you forget that and start using other properties, your app may work but not as efficiently as you'd originally envisaged. Of course, I could be talking rubbish, or over-optimising, etc...

share|improve this answer
3  
Hey, I'm not one to not want features because of fear out of the way they'll be abused, but can you imagine the kinds of crufty code that we'd see if they allowed named anonymous types to be passed out? (shiver) –  Dave Markle Feb 10 '09 at 23:16
3  
We might see some abuse. We might also see some much simpler code where we just want a tuple, basically. Not everything needs to be an object with complex behaviour. Sometimes "just the data" is the Right Thing. IMO, of course. –  Jon Skeet Feb 10 '09 at 23:18
    
Thanks, so your preference is to create types even if it's for a one-off view such as this? I have a lot of reports that slice the same data in different ways and was hoping to not have to create all of these different types (DogsWithBreeds, DogsWithOwnerNames, etc.) –  Jonathan S. Feb 10 '09 at 23:19
    
I'd try not to need to slice it in quite so many ways, or put the slicing part in the place which needs the data so you can use anonymous types - but beyond that, yes. It sucks in some ways, but such is life I'm afraid :( –  Jon Skeet Feb 10 '09 at 23:24

Just to add my two cents' worth :-) I recently learned a way of handling anonymous objects. It can only be used when targeting the .NET 4 framework and that only when adding a reference to System.Web.dll but then it's quite simple:

...
using System.Web.Routing;
...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        object anonymous = CallMethodThatReturnsObjectOfAnonymousType();
        //WHAT DO I DO WITH THIS?
        //I know! I'll use a RouteValueDictionary from System.Web.dll
        RouteValueDictionary rvd = new RouteValueDictionary(anonymous);
        Console.WriteLine("Hello, my name is {0} and I am a {1}", rvd["Name"], rvd["Occupation"]);
    }

    private static object CallMethodThatReturnsObjectOfAnonymousType()
    {
        return new { Id = 1, Name = "Peter Perhac", Occupation = "Software Developer" };
    }
}

In order to be able to add a reference to System.Web.dll you'll have to follow rushonerok's advice : Make sure your [project's] target framework is ".NET Framework 4" not ".NET Framework 4 Client Profile".

share|improve this answer

No you cannot return anonymous types without going through some trickery.

If you were not using C#, what you would be looking for (returning multiple data without a concrete type) is called a Tuple.

There are alot of C# tuple implementations, using the one shown here, your code would work like this.

public IEnumerable<Tuple<Dog,Breed>> GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select new Tuple<Dog,Breed>(d, b);

    return result;
}

And on the calling site:

void main() {
    IEnumerable<Tuple<Dog,Breed>> dogs = GetDogsWithBreedNames();
    foreach(Tuple<Dog,Breed> tdog in dogs)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dog {0} {1}", tdog.param1.Name, tdog.param2.BreedName);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This does not work. Throws a NotSupportedException: Only parameterless constructors and initializers are supported in LINQ to Entities –  mshsayem Apr 30 '12 at 3:36

You could do something like this:


public System.Collections.IEnumerable GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select new
                        {
                            Name = d.Name,
                            BreedName = b.BreedName
                        };
    return result.ToList();
}
share|improve this answer

Just select dogs, then use dog.Breed.BreedName, this should work fine.

If you have a lot of dogs, use DataLoadOptions.LoadWith to reduce the number of db calls.

share|improve this answer

You must use ToList() method firt to take rows from database and then Select items as a class. Try this:

public partial class Dog {
public string BreedName  { get; set; }}


List<Dog> GetDogsWithBreedNames(){
var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
var result = (from d in db.Dogs
             join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
             select new
                    {
                        Name = d.Name,
                        BreedName = b.BreedName
                    }).ToList()
                      .Select(x=> 
                          new Dog{
                              Name = x.Name,
                              BreedName = x.BreedName,
                          }).ToList();
return result;}

So, the trick is first ToList(). It is immediately makes the query and gets the data from database. Second trick is Selecting items and using object initializer to generate new objects with items loaded.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

If you have a relationship setup in your database with a foriegn key restraint on BreedId don't you get that already?

DBML relationship mapping

So I can now call:

internal Album GetAlbum(int albumId)
{
    return Albums.SingleOrDefault(a => a.AlbumID == albumId);
}

And in the code that calls that:

var album = GetAlbum(1);

foreach (Photo photo in album.Photos)
{
    [...]
}

So in your instance you'd be calling something like dog.Breed.BreedName - as I said, this relies on your database being set up with these relationships.

As others have mentioned, the DataLoadOptions will help reduce the database calls if that's an issue.

share|improve this answer

You can not return anonymous types directly, but you can loop them through your generic method. So do most of LINQ extension methods. There is no magic in there, while it looks like it they would return anonymous types. If parameter is anonymous result can also be anonymous.

var result = Repeat(new { Name = "Foo Bar", Age = 100 }, 10);

private static IEnumerable<TResult> Repeat<TResult>(TResult element, int count)
{
    for(int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        yield return element;
    }
}

Below an example based on code from original question:

var result = GetDogsWithBreedNames((Name, BreedName) => new {Name, BreedName });


public static IQueryable<TResult> GetDogsWithBreedNames<TResult>(Func<object, object, TResult> creator)
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                    join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                    select creator(d.Name, b.BreedName);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Well, if you're returning Dogs, you'd do:

public IQueryable<Dog> GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    return from d in db.Dogs
           join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
           select d;
}

If you want the Breed eager-loaded and not lazy-loaded, just use the appropriate DataLoadOptions construct.

share|improve this answer
    
Will this give me Dogs with their breed names or just the fields in the Dogs table? –  Jonathan S. Feb 10 '09 at 23:15

BreedId in the Dog table is obviously a foreign key to the corresponding row in the Breed table. If you've got your database set up properly, LINQ to SQL should automatically create an association between the two tables. The resulting Dog class will have a Breed property, and the Breed class should have a Dogs collection. Setting it up this way, you can still return IEnumerable<Dog>, which is an object that includes the breed property. The only caveat is that you need to preload the breed object along with dog objects in the query so they can be accessed after the data context has been disposed, and (as another poster has suggested) execute a method on the collection that will cause the query to be performed immediately (ToArray in this case):

public IEnumerable<Dog> GetDogs()
{
    using (var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString))
    {
        db.LoadOptions.LoadWith<Dog>(i => i.Breed);
        return db.Dogs.ToArray();
    }

}

It is then trivial to access the breed for each dog:

foreach (var dog in GetDogs())
{
    Console.WriteLine("Dog's Name: {0}", dog.Name);
    Console.WriteLine("Dog's Breed: {0}", dog.Breed.Name);        
}
share|improve this answer

Now I realize that the compiler won't let me return a set of anonymous types since it's expecting Dogs, but is there a way to return this without having to create a custom type?

Use use object to return a list of Anonymous types without creating a custom type. This will work without the compiler error (in .net 4.0). I returned the list to the client and then parsed it on JavaScript:

public object GetDogsWithBreedNames()
{
    var db = new DogDataContext(ConnectString);
    var result = from d in db.Dogs
                 join b in db.Breeds on d.BreedId equals b.BreedId
                 select new
                        {
                            Name = d.Name,
                            BreedName = b.BreedName
                        };
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

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