Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a file matching program for a project for school. The idea is that one program allows you to enter info as follows: 1000 (acct number) Jane Doe 54.50 (balance). Then allow you to enter the account number and a transaction amount for the second program to combine and update a new master file.

The programs are working together just fine (the second one takes information from the first, including any transactions and updates the new balance - searching by account number) but the problem I am running into is with the name.

---Wasn't clear here. When I ask for a name and I put in a single string of characters, the program works fine, if I try to put in a full name, like Jane Doe I go into the loop mentioned below.

I've tried char name[20] which puts me into an infinite loop and I have to 'x' out of the program and I've tried assigning first and lastName to string. That worked for the writing but the program that takes the input file oldMaster and the transaction file inTransaction then outputs a new file newMaster, doesn't recognize the name.

I've tried getline also which isn't working for me, probably programmer error.

Should this be done as an array, if that's possible for this? I think I'm getting hung up on the fact that I am editing files. Answers are fine - but I like to figure it out on my own, just looking for a little guidance on where to go from here.

Hopefully this was fairly clear - if not I'll be happy to explain again in a different way. Just frustrated that I'm this close and can't solve it.

Thanks in advance!

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;



void createOldMaster()
{

    ofstream oldMaster;
    int accountNum;
    double balance;
    char name[15];

    oldMaster.open("oldmast.dat", ios::out);

    if(!oldMaster)
    {
        cout << "Unable to open the file." << endl;
        exit(1);
    } // end if

    cout << "Enter the account number (0 to exit)." << endl;

    while(true)
    {
        cout << "Account Number: ";
        cin >> accountNum;  

        if(accountNum == 0)
            break;

        else
        {
                        \\ This is where it hangs up if I use a first and last name
            cout << "\nName: "; 
            cin >> name;
            cout << "\nBalance : " << endl;
            cin >> balance;

            oldMaster << accountNum << " " << name << " " << balance << endl;

        }
    }

} //end createOldMaster

void createTransaction()
{

    ofstream inTransaction;
    int accountNum;
    double balance;

    inTransaction.open("trans.dat");

    if(!inTransaction)
    {
        cout << "Unable to open the transaction file." << endl;
        exit(1);
    }

    cout << "Enter the account number and balance (0 to exit): " << endl;

    while(true)
    {
        cout << "Account Number: " << endl;
        cin >> accountNum;

        if(accountNum == 0)
            break;

        else
        {
        cout << "Balance: " << endl;
        cin >> balance;

        inTransaction << accountNum << " " << balance << endl;

        }
    }
} //end createTransaction

int main()
{
    createOldMaster();
    createTransaction();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
It's not clear to me what your problem is. –  wilhelmtell Mar 18 '11 at 0:59
    
Some code, please? –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 18 '11 at 1:00
    
Show us the code you have already. –  Keith Mar 18 '11 at 1:01
    
Can you show us the version with getline? I think >> will always break on whitespace: "Extraction ends when the next character is either a valid whitespace or a null character, or if the End-Of-File is reached." –  sarnold Mar 18 '11 at 1:43
    
I never got a version with getline working - was curious if that is the correct tree to bark up. I don't mind spending hours learning this - but I don't wanna spend hours climbing the wrong tree any more than I need to. –  Chris Mar 18 '11 at 1:52

1 Answer 1

Your best bet is to use as much of the standard C++ library as you can. Have a reference handy, maybe even a copy of the C++ standard if you're so inclined, and look for shortcuts to make your work easier and your code shorter.

Avoid primitive arrays and primitive strings wherever possible. Instead of primitive arrays try to use std::vector. Instead of primitive strings try to use std::string. Instead of C's FILE* try to use std::ofstream and std::ifstream. If you need to prohibit two accounts with the same account number then choose a C++ container that guarantees unique elements. If you need to find an element in a container try to use a member function of the container for the search, and if that doesn't exist then a standard search function from the standard C++ algorithms.

Reuse and steal mercilessly.

share|improve this answer
1  
Mind if I "reuse" that last line? ;) –  Maxpm Mar 18 '11 at 1:28
    
I love it. By the way - that is the path I've been going down but it isn't getting me to where I need to go. I'm trying to combine I guess (still way new here) 2 strings into one.... array? I guess I don't know where to go to get a first and last name as one of the 3 arguments or blocks of information or whatever the smart sounding thing is here. –  Chris Mar 18 '11 at 3:21
    
@Chris A few points about your code. You're off to a very good start. First, use ofstream's constructor for opening the file: ofstream f("filename");. Then you don't need to use f.open() and you don't need to use f.close(), because the constructor and destructor will do these for you. Also, when you call exit(1) your local objects won't clean up. Report an error for the caller instead, and ultimately in main() return an error code to the operating system. Avoid exit() when possible. –  wilhelmtell Mar 18 '11 at 4:01
    
Next, after you call oldMaster.open() you check the stream with operator!() but report that the file didn't open correctly. That's wrong, that's not what operator!() checks for. For that you have f.is_open(). Now, inside your loop in createOldMaster() you take input from stdin. Make sure you check for success in input: if( cin >> accountNum ) /*...*/ else /* failure */. For example, if the user enters a name with letters when they're supposed to enter the account number you should report the error. –  wilhelmtell Mar 18 '11 at 4:07
    
Now comes your question. The issue is that operator>>() for strings stops on whitespace. So, if the input is hello world then when you extract it into a string from std::cin you only get hello in the string. Again, that's because when reading strings in a formatted manner from std::cin (and that's what operator>>() does; formatted input) then the read stops at whitespace. Why? Because it has to stop at some point. It can be at newline, it can be at end of file, it can be at the first number -- the library can't tell what's right for you. So it stops at whitespace. –  wilhelmtell Mar 18 '11 at 4:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.