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This example code below is #36 in John Resig`s Learning Advnaced JavaScript. http://ejohn.org/apps/learn/#36

It is called We need to make sure the new operator is always used.

Six Questions - I would appreciate as much detail as you can provide

1) Is function User ever actually called in this code? I note that when it says assert(user...), user is lower case. If the function gets called, how? does it get called when it asserts the variable user, which has a function call attached to it i.e. User("John," name)

2) If Im correct in assuming that function User is never called, is there a way that the codethis.name = first + " " + last;` is run?

3) If the function User is called, or if it were to be called, can you please explain the order of operations inside the function User. For example, it returns new User before it does this.name = first + " " + last; how would that work if this function were called or is called?

4) in what way could !(this instanceof User) if be true. since the function User is the object, wouldn`t "this" always be an instance of itself?

5) regarding the first assert i.e. assert(user, "this was defined correctly, even if it was by mistake"), can you please explain how it was defined correctly, and, importantly, please explain how it was a mistake? How should it have been done so it`s not a mistake?

6) regarding the second assert, why is it a noteworthy that the right name was maintained? Isnt it as simple as variablenamehaving been assignedResig`. In what way might you have expected name to change?

function User(first, last){ 
  if ( !(this instanceof User) ) 
    return new User(first, last); 

  this.name = first + " " + last; 
} 

var name = "Resig"; 
var user = User("John", name); 

assert( user, "This was defined correctly, even if it was by mistake." ); 
assert( name == "Resig", "The right name was maintained." );
share|improve this question
    
You need to look at the question right before this, ejohn.org/apps/learn/#34 : "What happens when we forget to use the new operator?" –  Cole Mar 18 '11 at 2:14
    
@Cole, i did but Im still having trouble putting it all together. The answers below helped me realize I dont really understand prototypes and other stuff. –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 2:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This example is demonstrating a fundamental flaw in JavaScript's design, which is that calling functions intended to be used as constructors without the new operator can cause unintentional modification of the global object.

  1. User is called on this line: var user = User("John", name);. Lowercase user holds a reference to the new uppercase User instance.

  2. See #1.

  3. If User is called without new, then this will not be an instanceof User. When this happens, we immediately call new User(...). In this second call, this will be an instanceof User, so the conditional block is skipped and we simply continue on with the constructor, creating a new instance of User as originally intended.

  4. When it's called without the new operator, the value of this in a function simply refers to the global object, which is window in a browser. This is a serious mistake in the design of JavaScript, for which this exercise is demonstrating a workaround.

  5. Because there is no explict return from the User constructor (without the instanceof check's block) , if User were called without new it would return undefined and the assert would fail. The instanceof check prevents this.

  6. Without the protection of the instanceof check, calling User without new would cause unexpected results. Since this would refer to window, the assignment to this.name would update window.name, not the name property of a new User instance, and the assert would fail.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. a couple questions (1) regarding #3, when you say, "we immediately call new User(...)" where is this call? is the return new User(first,last), the call you are referring to? (2) again, regarding #3, when "this" will be an instance of User, you say the condition block is skipped (so no return new User) and continues on with the constructor, "creating a new instance of User"..where is this new instance of User created if "return new User" is skipped in the conditional block. Is this new user created with the code: this.name = first + " " + last; ??? –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:30
    
The return of the new object is implicit when the function is called with new. When it isn't called with new, there is an explicit return statement, which returns the result of calling User with new. –  lwburk Mar 18 '11 at 1:40

1.the function User is called at var user = User("John", name);

2.pass

3.I didn't understand your question.

4.

user = User("a", "b"); would do that.

5.user = new User("a", "b"); is the correct one.

6.I don't know.

share|improve this answer
    
For 3. Normally this would be a DOM object. DomWindow maybe. –  wliao Mar 18 '11 at 1:23
    
thank you. about #3, because the function has a return before the end of the function, i was wondering about the sequence of events from start to finish inside the function. i.e. Step 1, this happens. Step 2, this happens..etc –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:39

Any given function object can be used two ways.

  1. As a function
  2. As a constructor

The difference being the value of the this binding. When you use a function as a constructor the this binding will be a new object with the same prototype as the constructor. Normally calling a function will set the this binding to the global object. (With version 5 this will not happen.)

The second assert is very important now that you know that the this binding can be coerced to the global object.


A Simplification of Calling a Constructor

function ConstructUser(fname, lname) {
    var obj = {}; // Empty Object

    // In reality a special internal Prototype property
    // is assigned rather than 'obj.prototype'.
    if (User.prototype instanceof Object) {
        obj.prototype = User.prototype;
    } else {
        obj.prototype = Object.prototype;    
    }

    // Now call the User function with the 
    // new object as the 'this' binding.
    User.call(obj, fname, lname);

    return obj;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. If you have more time, about what you said...(1)In the code in the OP, the function is used as a constructor when it does return new User(first,last)? (2) when you say "the this binding will be a new object", is the new object the new User that is returned? (3) when you say the "same prototype as the constructor" Im a bit confused. Isnt function User the prototype itself as well as the constructor? –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:24
    
@mjmitche - I left too many fill in the blanks didn't I? Let me see if I can improve my answer. –  ChaosPandion Mar 18 '11 at 1:26
    
@ChaosPandion yes, I`m a newbie reading above my level...but I find this the best way to learn if all the blanks can be filled in :)) thanks for your help. –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:31
    
@mjmitche - Check out my latest edit. Hopefully it clears things up a bit more. –  ChaosPandion Mar 18 '11 at 1:41
    
thank you very much for trying. it`s still very dense for me. –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:50

1) Is function User ever actually called in this code? I note that when it says assert(user...), user is lower case. If the function gets called, how? does it get called when it asserts the variable user, which has a function call attached to it User("John," name)

Yes. It is first called with this bound to the global object (see caveat below), and then it calls itself with a blank object whose prototype is User.prototype bound to this.

The first "call" invokes the builtin function call operator, and the second "call" invokes the builtin function construct operator. For user defined functions the two are the same, but the spec does distinguish between the two.

2) If I'm correct in assuming that function User is never called, is there a way that the code this.name = first + " " + last; is run?

Yes. The second invocation will reach that since in the second invocation this is a User.

3) If the function User is called, or if it were to be called, can you please explain the order of operations inside the function User. For example, it returns new User before it does this.name = first + " " + last; how would that work if this function were called or is called?

A call does not return until the body finishes. So the "call" invocation starts, which starts the "construct" invocation, which returns, yielding the new User which is then returned by the first invocation.

4) in what way could !(this instanceof User) if be true. since the function User is the object, wouldn`t "this" always be an instance of itself?

No. If the if statement were not there, User.call({}, "John", "Doe") would cause User to be "called" with this bound to a blank object. Try running

var notAUser = {};
User.call(notAUser, "John", "Doe")
alert(JSON.stringify(notAUser));

and you should get

{ "name": "John Doe" }

5) regarding the first assert i.e. assert(user, "this was defined correctly, even if it was by mistake"), can you please explain how it was defined correctly, and, importantly, please explain how it was a mistake? How should it have been done so it`s not a mistake?

It is the author's opinion that not putting new before User was a programmer error.

6) regarding the second assert, why is it a noteworthy that the right name was maintained? Isnt it as simple as variablenamehaving been assignedResig`. In what way might you have expected name to change?

The global variable name is a property of the global object. If this is bound to the global object, then assigning this.name would change the global variable.

Caveat:

For language-lawyers, According to the language spec when you call a function as a function, not as a method, this is bound to null. Another part of the spec says that when you read this, if it is null, what you get back is the global object instead. This difference is significant in the case of EcmaScript 5 strict mode, because that changes the second part so that no funny stuff is done when reading this. If this is null, reading it will give you back the value null.

EDIT:

The construct operator is only defined in the JavaScript spec. The new operator in the JavaScript language is the way you invoke it.

For user defined functions, it works as follows:

  1. Code calls new f(arg1, arg2)
  2. JS interpreter allocates space for a new object and sets its prototype to f.prototype.
  3. JS interpreter invokes f with this set to the new object and with arg1 and arg2 as the actual parameters.
  4. If f returns an object, that is used as the result of new instead.
  5. Otherwise, the new object is used. If you return any non-object value, even a string or number, then the new object is the result of new.
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. if possible could you explain in a bit more detail (a) how the function calls itself a second time and (b) what is it that exactly triggers or calls this built in construct operator and what does that operator look like? i.e. what is it doing? isn`t the "return new User" also a type of construct? –  mjmitche Mar 18 '11 at 1:55
    
Edited to add detail. –  Mike Samuel Mar 18 '11 at 4:47
    
Edited to add detail. In brief, the new operator is the trigger for the builtin construct operator. Call is an overloaded term. In your example, the function is invoked as a function, realizes that this is not bound correctly, and then invokes-itself as a constructor. –  Mike Samuel Mar 18 '11 at 4:54

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