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I am creating a list of lists using this code:

zeroArray = [0]*Np
zeroMatrix = []
for i in range(Np):
    zeroMatrix.append(zeroArray[:])

Is there a more efficient way to do this? I'm hoping for something along the lines of zeroArray = [0]*Np; zeroMat = zeroArray*Np but can't find anything similar.

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curious...whats Np? –  Elxx Mar 18 '11 at 1:31
    
it's a variable for # of points –  Charles L. Mar 18 '11 at 1:41
2  
If you're doing numerical work, I strongly recommend using a numerical package. –  detly Mar 18 '11 at 2:02
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could do this:

zeroMatrix = [[0] * Np for i in range(Np)]

Update: Well if we're going to make it into a race, I've found something faster (on my computer) than Omnifarious' method. This doesn't beat numpy of course; but this is all academic anyway right? I mean we're talking about microseconds here.

I think this works because it avoids append and avoids preallocating zeroMatrix.

zeroArray = [0] * Np
zeroMatrix = [zeroArray[:] for i in range(Np)]

My test results:

$ python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroMatrix = [[0] * Np for i in range(Np)]"
1000 loops, best of 3: 200 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroArray = [0] * Np" "zeroMatrix = [None] * Np" "for i in range(Np):" "    zeroMatrix[i] = zeroArray[:]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 171 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroArray = [0] * Np" "zeroMatrix = [zeroArray[:] for i in range(Np)]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 165 usec per loop
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The second (IIRC) makes each element of zeroMatrix a copy of the same mutable list, so zeroMatrix[0][2] += 1 will affect all zeroMatrix[n][2] elements. (Unless they've changed that behavior for Python 3. I really need to upgrade already...) EDIT: Nevermind, you removed it. –  Chris Lutz Mar 18 '11 at 1:35
    
Mine is significantly faster than yours according to timeit. Though in python3 they are approximately equivalent. Though if you increase Np enough, mine still wins. –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 1:35
1  
@Charles - No, it doesn't. senderle had that code at one point, but took it out because it's wrong. See my earlier comment. –  Chris Lutz Mar 18 '11 at 1:45
1  
@Charles L.: That will not work. As soon as you set one element in that matrix, the entire column that element is in will appear to be set to the same thing. –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 1:45
1  
I tested, and your version shows up as consistently very slightly slower than my version. I suspect which of ours is best depends on the Python version and/or hardware platform. –  Omnifarious Aug 19 '11 at 16:33
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Maybe you should consider using NumPy. It seems like you're doing numerical work, which is what it's made for. This is the fastest so far, not including the import statement:

import numpy
Np = 80
zeroMatrix = numpy.zeros((Np, Np))

Times:

>python -m timeit -s "import numpy; Np = 80" "zeroMatrix = numpy.zeros((Np, Np))"
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.36 usec per loop

>python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroArray = [0]*Np" "zeroMatrix = [None] * Np" "for i in range(Np):" "  zeroMatrix[i] = zeroArray[:]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 62.5 usec per loop

>python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroMatrix = [[0] * Np for i in range (Np)]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 77.5 usec per loop

>python -m timeit -s "Np = 80" "zeroMatrix = [[0 for _ in range(Np)] for _ in range(Np)]"
1000 loops, best of 3: 474 usec per loop
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+1, good point. –  senderle Mar 18 '11 at 2:06
3  
+1 and of course numpy has a powerful set of array operations once you set up the array which are immensely faster than spinning your own later for python lists. –  JoshAdel Mar 18 '11 at 2:38
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This would probably be slightly more efficient:

zeroArray = [0]*Np
zeroMatrix = [None] * Np
for i in range(Np):
    zeroMatrix[i] = zeroArray[:]

What you would really like won't work the way you hope. This is because if you created Np copies of a list element using *, you get Np references to the same thing. For the 0 this isn't a big deal since you just get a new number when you add anything to it. But for lists you would end up with a matrix where as soon as you changed any element of a row, the entire column would change right along with it.

This way is the second fastest so far mentioned:

$ python3 -m timeit -s 'Np = 80' 'zeroArray = [0]*Np
zeroMatrix = [None] * Np
for i in range(Np):
    zeroMatrix[i] = zeroArray[:]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 72.8 usec per loop

$ python3 -m timeit -s 'Np = 80' 'zeroMatrix = [[0] * Np for i in range(Np)]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 85 usec per loop

$ python3 -m timeit -s 'Np = 80' 'zeroMatrix = [[0 for _ in range(Np)] for _ in range(Np)]'
1000 loops, best of 3: 566 usec per loop

I can't do my own timeit of the numpy-based solution as I don't have a numpy package for Python3 on my system. But it is very definitely faster by a significant margin.

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Well, so much for trying to make the absolutely fastest one. That's really irritating. –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 1:44
    
@Omnifarious - I win anyway :P –  detly Mar 18 '11 at 1:59
    
@detly - So you do. I'm not all that familiar with numpy. :-) –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 2:06
    
@Omnifarious - I love it, because I might never have to use Matlab again. –  detly Mar 18 '11 at 2:10
    
@detly: See, I've never used matlab. :-) –  Omnifarious Mar 18 '11 at 2:13
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Perhaps this is what you'd like?

zeroMatrix = [[0 for _ in range(Np)] for _ in range(Np)]

I'm not sure if this will provide a performance benefit (profile, as always) but I don't really know what you mean by "efficient." Other than avoiding the use of list.append.

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