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I need to break a number down to be represented by a randomly ordered sequence of 2s and 3s.

For example:

  • 5 can be 3,2 or 2,3
  • 6 can be 3,3

I'm currently doing this with a loop in ActionScript 3 but have been looking into the possibility of using some kind of mathematical formula to save me a few lines of code. I'm a bit of a sop when it comes to Math and I've not yet found anything suitable.

Does anyone know if such a thing exists?

Thanks,

Crung

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1  
Do you mean that something which can be created by either twos or threes could be done either way? Or should the least amount of numbers always be used? In other words, can 6 be [2, 2, 2] or does it have to be [3, 3]? –  jdmichal Mar 18 '11 at 6:56
    
@jdmichal Good question. I hope the former. It's slightly more interesting if the number of twos and threes are both free (within the constraints of the sequence) ^^ –  user166390 Mar 18 '11 at 7:01
    
@pst But having a random distribution of the twos and threes kind of works against having a formula! –  jdmichal Mar 18 '11 at 7:18

4 Answers 4

To save a few lines of code? When you have functions, you can do anything in one line of code :-)

Pseudo-code:

def makelist (n):
    list = []
    if n is less than 2:
        return list
    while n > 0:
        select case n is 4 or 2:
            list.append (2)
            n = n - 2
        select case n is 3:
            list.append (3)
            n = n - 3
        select case random() is odd:
            list.append (2)
            n = n - 2
        select otherwise:
            list.append (3)
            n = n - 3
    return list

Then you just need one line of code wherever you want to make use of it:

list = makelist (62)
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What happens if random() is even and n is 4? –  jdmichal Mar 18 '11 at 7:07
    
Damn good point, fixed the conditions to ensure that cannot happen. –  paxdiablo Mar 18 '11 at 7:11
    
I like this answer, but it seems like end condition might make the randomness slightly skewed?/////// –  user166390 Mar 18 '11 at 7:42
1  
It still seems that this code does not handle the case where 2 is chosen on the first pass, then a second 2 appears from the random generator, in an attempt to get to a total of 5. –  user85109 Mar 18 '11 at 8:13
1  
@wwodchips, hmm, if people keep finding holes in my logic, I may have to get a job in the fast food industry :-) That final edit should fix it. There's now no way to get to a non-finishing state - the last state to act randomly is at 5 which will result in either 3 or 2, at which point it becomes deterministic. 6 can only lead to 3/4 which are both deterministic. 7 can lead to 4/5 of which the 4 is deterministic and the 5 leads to determinism. 8 can only lead to 5/6 which we've already covered as becoming deterministic in the next transition. –  paxdiablo Mar 18 '11 at 8:34

Let's say the number that you try to decompose to 2a+3b is n. Split it up:

n = 6*(n/6-1) + 6+(n%6)

where % is modulo and / is integer division. The first part is divisible by 6, and can as such be written as a series of 2+2+2 or 3+3. For the second part, use some kind of table to make a choice. Since it is always between 6 and 11, all numbers can be made.

6+(n%6) | sum
--------+----
   6    | 3+3
   7    | 2+2+3
   8    | 2+3+3
   9    | 3+3+3
  10    | 3+3+2+2
  11    | 3+3+3+2

Advantages of this include that you can vary the number of 3s and 2s, and that you don't have to use any kind of inefficient loop.

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1 can't be formed. 2, 3 and 4 can only be formed in one way. For the rest, pick 2 or 3 randomly and continue.

private function TwoThree_v2(n : Number) : Array {
    // Initialize the count array
    // It is a simple recurrence relation a(n) = a(n-2) + a(n-3)
    // saying how many sequences with sum n there are.
    var counts = new Array();
    counts.push(1);
    counts.push(0);
    counts.push(1);
    for (var i = 3; i <= n; i++) {
        counts.push(counts[i-2] + counts[i-3]);
    }
    var result = new Array();
    while (n > 4) {
        var w2 = counts[n-2];
        var w3 = counts[n-3];
        // Branch according to how many sequences that continues
        // with 2 and 3, respectively.
        if (Math.random()*(w2+w3) < w2) {
            result.push(2);
            n -= 2;
        }
        else {
            result.push(3);
            n -= 3;
        }
    }
    // Add the last 1-2 digits.
    if (n == 2 || n == 3) {
        result.push(n);
    }
    else if (n == 4) {
        result.push(2);
        result.push(2);
    }
    else {
        throw new Error("Can't form " + n.ToString());
    }
    return result;
}

Now each sequence will be returned with an equal probability:

With n = 10:
[2, 2, 2, 2, 2]     14414
[2, 2, 3, 3]        14271
[2, 3, 2, 3]        14061
[2, 3, 3, 2]        14452
[3, 2, 2, 3]        14191
[3, 2, 3, 2]        14278
[3, 3, 2, 2]        14333
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Your tests are showing that the number of twos and threes are almost evenly distributed because your random generation doesn't randomly generate all possible sequences. In fact about 56.894929% of the values should be 2s. –  btilly Mar 18 '11 at 15:14
    
Indeed. It took some trying to arrive at an algorithm that returns all possible sequences with equal probability. –  Markus Jarderot Mar 18 '11 at 19:25

Assuming that you must use the least number of digits:

var number = 1000;
var threes = number / 3;
var twos = ((number % 3) == 0) ? 0 :
           ((number % 3) == 1) ? 2 : 1;

// Account for case of four left at the end.
if (twos == 2) {
    --threes;
}

Now you just need to form the list:

// First start with all threes.
var list = [];
for(var i = 0; i < threes; ++i) {
    list.push(i);
}

// Now randomly pick locations to add the two.
for(i = 0; i < twos; ++i) {
    list.splice(Math.round(Math.random() * list.length), 2);
}

Unfortunately, a random distribution of twos and threes makes an easy formula impossible. The best you could do is determine a random ratio of twos to threes, then find a fit for the given number.

var ratio = Math.random(); //Ratio of twos to threes.
// number = 2a + 3b; a = ratio * b;
// number = 2(ratio * b) + 3b;
// number = (2 * ratio + 3) * b;
// number / (2 * ratio + 3) = b;
var threes = number / (2 * ratio + 3);
var twos = ratio * threes;

// At this point, need to round threes and twos...
threes = Math.round(threes);
twos = Math.round(twos);

// Then adjust to ensure that rounded total equals number.
// Note that diff will be in range [-5, 5].
// Probably tighter even but I'm too lazy to figure out the true maximum.
var diff = number - (3 * threes + 2 * twos);
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