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While implementing the Chain of Responsibility pattern, i came across a dilemma on how to pass data between objects in the chain. The datatypes passed between object in the chain can differ for each object. As a temporary fix I had created a Static class containing a stack where each object in the chain can push the results to the stack while the next object in the chain could pop the results from the stack. Here is a sample code on what I had implemented.

public interface IHandler
{        
  IHandler Successor {get; set; }
  void Process();        
}

//Temporary Data Container class to store objects\data    
public static class StackManager
{
  public static Stack DataStack = new Stack();
}

//This class doesn't require any input to operate
public class OpsA : IHandler
{
  public IHandler Successor {get; set; }
  public void Process()
   {
      //Do some processing, store the result into Stack
      var ProcessedData = DoSomeOperation();
      StackManager.DataStack.Push(ProcessedData);

      if(Successor != null) Successor();            
  }
}

//This class require input data to operate upon
public class OpsB : IHandler
{
  public IHandler Successor {get; set; }
  public void Process()
  {
      //Retrieve the results from the previous Operation
      var InputData =  StackManager.DataStack.Pop();

      //Do some processing, store the result into Stack
      var NewProcessedData = DoMoreProcessing(InputData);      
      StackManager.DataStack.Push(NewProcessedData);

      if(Successor != null) Successor();
  }
}

public class ChainOfResponsibilityPattern
{
  public void Process()
  {
       IHandler ProcessA = new  OpsA();  
       IHandler ProcessB = new  OpsB();

       ProcessA.Successor = ProcessB;
       ProcessA.Process();
  }
}

Please help me to find a better approach to pass data between handlers in the chain.

share|improve this question
1  
What are you actually trying to get out of using the chain pattern? Each of your links seems quite tightly coupled to the link before it, which suggests you may as well know the concrete type you're calling. Do you have multiple links that can process the same data type? Do all of your links process data from the stack, other than the first one? –  forsvarir Mar 18 '11 at 8:52
    
This doesn't seems a proper use of the CoR pattern, you should be able the change the order of the chain and it should keep working. –  Glenner003 Mar 18 '11 at 9:04
    
I guess chain of responsibility is not proper here. –  Tengiz Mar 18 '11 at 10:17

3 Answers 3

It would be much more standard to add an argument to your IHandler.Process() method so that a single object is passed through the entire chain, and have each entry in the chain use and mutate the passed object as needed. This object could be your stack, but the dependence on previous entries pushing something onto the stack still makes the processors highly interdependent.

With more details on what you're actually doing, we might be able to suggest a better approach, and it might be that chain of responsibility is just not appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
Adding an argument to the process method was a good suggestion. What I was trying to achieve was that, I have an app that does some ETL operations like reading from file, validating, transforming, loading etc. These operations order could vary for different clients. So my plan was to create independent processing objects for each of the operations and chain it together for every client as needed. In my case there is around 30+ processing objects. What I meant by processing object is like Reading a file, making a service call, DB write operation etc. –  AbrahamJP Mar 19 '11 at 19:16

When you have a Chain of Responsibility, this typically involves a single context therefore a good approach is to pass on a Context object.

One interesting thing I would note is around the mutability of the context.

You can have a mutable context and then you would instantiate the context object, pass it to ProcessorA. ProcessorA may modify it and set its own data, then pass it on to ProcessorB. Then ProcessorB modifies it some more and finally the caller may read the context.

If you want to have more data safety and encapsulate the behavior of each Processor as a input-to-output blackbox, you may opt for an immutable context object. ProcessorA may receive an empty context object, then construct one for ProcessorB and return ProcessorB's output.

share|improve this answer

Why not just pass a Dictionary, or even a List?

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean to use Dictionary or IList instead of Stack? –  AbrahamJP Mar 18 '11 at 8:27
    
Indeed, that's what I meant. When you pass a List or Dictionary, the order in which you add/modify data is not important. –  Roy Dictus Mar 21 '11 at 12:24

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