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Background

Users type information into web form inputs such as:

<input type="text" name="report_name" value="First name" />
<select name="report_date_birthday">
  <option value="2038-01-19">Jan 19, 2038</option>
</select>
<input type="checkbox" name="report_array_colour[]" value="Blue" />Blue
<input type="checkbox" name="report_array_colour[]" value="Red" />Red

These values are eventually passed into reporting software. The reporting software API requires name-value pairs with the names as String instances and the values as Java classes.

Problem

A subclass implements an abstract method (that associates user input types with Java classes) as follows:

private static final String REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX = "report_";

protected Map<String, Class<?>> getPrefixes() {
  Map<String, Class<?>> map = new HashMap<String, Class<?>>();

  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "", java.lang.String.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "int_", java.lang.Integer.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "float_", java.math.BigDecimal.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "array_", java.util.List.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "date_", java.util.Date.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "time_", java.sql.Time.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "timestamp_", java.sql.Timestamp.class );

  return map;
}

All user inputs are submitted as java.lang.String values, except report_array_ values.

Questions

Ignoring report_array_ input values:

  1. What is the most efficient way to instantiate the Java classes that are mapped to user input types using the values provided by the user?
  2. Is there a better mechanism to map the user input types such that instantiating their representative classes is easier to implement?
  3. Is there a better way to represent the user input types within the web form?

Thank you!

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2 Answers 2

Putting the type information into the names of the name-value pairs is a fine way to do it. It allows the process to be automated. For example, you can write a filter that iterates over the request parameters, does the conversion for each, and store the new objects as a request attribute.

Also, each of the classes (which the exception of List) contains a .valueOf(String) method, which will do most of the conversions for you. You might be better of using a SimpleDateFormat for creating your time and date objects. This will allow you to sanitize your data.

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There is no "valueOf" interface, so the separate classes cannot be instantiated automatically. Looks like I have to convert the class to its appropriate instance using a cascade of if-else statements. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 23 '11 at 8:02
    
@Dave: You can reflect for the valueOf and just call it. –  Jeremy Heiler Mar 23 '11 at 12:05
    
Only three of the classes have a static valueOf method. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 23 '11 at 18:12
    
@Dave: Correct. So then you would have to use SimpleDataFormat for the dates. –  Jeremy Heiler Mar 23 '11 at 21:07
    
Comments are not long enough for me to explain my thoughts. See my answer for details. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 23 '11 at 21:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only way I have found to convert the values is by doing it manually:

protected Object convertValue( String prefix, String value ) {
  Class<?> c = getPrefixes().get( prefix );
  Object result = value;

  try {
    if( c == java.lang.String.class ) {
      result = new String( value );
    }
    else if( c == java.sql.Timestamp.class ) {
      result = Timestamp.valueOf( value );
    }
    else if( c == java.sql.Time.class ) {
      result = Time.valueOf( value );
    }
    else if( c == java.util.Date.class ) {
      DateFormat sdf = createDateFormat();
      result = sdf.parse( value );
    }
    else if( c == java.math.BigDecimal.class ) {
      result = new BigDecimal( value );
    }
    else if( c == java.lang.Integer.class ) {
      result = Integer.valueOf( value );
    }
    else if( prefix.equalsIgnoreCase( PARAM_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "array_int_" ) ) {
      result = parseIntegerArray( value );
    }
  }
  catch( Exception e ) {
    throw new RuntimeException( e );
  }

  return result;
}

Note that this implies that the map, then, is not necessary, as it adds an unused layer of complexity:

  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "", java.lang.String.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "int_", java.lang.Integer.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "float_", java.math.BigDecimal.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "array_", java.util.List.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "date_", java.util.Date.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "time_", java.sql.Time.class );
  map.put( REPORT_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "timestamp_", java.sql.Timestamp.class );

Since the map adds no value to the conversion process, it can be removed, which means the convertValue method becomes:

  protected Object convertValue( String prefix, String value ) {
    Object result = value;

    try {
      if( prefix.equalsIgnoreCase( PARAM_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "" ) ) {
        result = new String( value );
      }
      else if( prefix.equalsIgnoreCase( PARAM_VARIABLE_PREFIX + "timestamp_" ) ) {
        result = Timestamp.valueOf( value );
      }
      // ... etc.
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