Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Summarization:

Please check the comments below from David, Uwe, and other experts.

================================================================================

The following code swaps two rows in a two-dimensional, dynamic array of double values. I am wondering: (1) whether the following code is a best practice of swapping two rows of a two-dimensional array? If not, then what is the best practice to do this kind of job? (2) why would the following code work? I mean, isn't two-dimensional array a continuous contiguous section of memory? Does the following code work only by luck? Any suggestion is appreciated!

    unit Unit5;

    interface

    uses
      Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
      Dialogs;

    type
      TAADouble = array of array of Double;

      TForm5 = class(TForm)
        procedure FormShow(Sender: TObject);
      private
        { Private declarations }
      public
        { Public declarations }
      end;

    var
      Form5: TForm5;

    procedure SwapRows(arr: TAADouble; row0, row1: Integer);

    implementation

    {$R *.dfm}

    procedure SwapRows(arr: TAADouble; row0, row1: Integer);
    var
      Tmp: Integer;
    begin
      {$IFDEF FPC}
      Tmp := PtrUInt(arr[row0]);
      PtrUInt(arr[row0]) := PtrUInt(arr[row1]);
      PtrUInt(arr[row1]) := Tmp;
      {$ELSE}
      Tmp := Integer(arr[row0]);
      Integer(arr[row0]) := Integer(arr[row1]);
      Integer(arr[row1]) := Tmp;
      {$ENDIF}

    end;

    procedure TForm5.FormShow(Sender: TObject);
    var
      tmpArray: TAADouble;
      I, J: Integer;
      rowStr: string;
    begin
      SetLength(tmpArray, 10, 10);
      rowStr := '';

      for I := 0 to 9 do
        for J := 0 to 9 do
          tmpArray[I][J] := I * J;

      for I := 0 to 9 do
      begin
        rowStr := '';
        for J := 0 to 9 do
          rowStr := rowStr + FloatToStr(tmpArray[I][J]) + '  ';
        OutputDebugString(PWideChar(rowStr));
      end;

      SwapRows(tmpArray, 3, 4);

      for I := 0 to 9 do
      begin
        rowStr := '';
        for J := 0 to 9 do
          rowStr := rowStr + FloatToStr(tmpArray[I][J]) + '  ';
        OutputDebugString(PWideChar(rowStr));
      end;
    end;

    end.
share|improve this question
1  
While the above works (at the moment), casting a pointer to an Integer is not safe - this will fail miserably when the 64-bit version arrives... if you are using a recent Delphi, use the NativeInt type, otherwise define your own that you can set to match the pointer size yourself. –  Alistair Ward Mar 18 '11 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You ask:

Does the following code work only by luck?

Well, yes, you are relying on implementation specific details.

In fact the correct way to write it is perfectly natural and simple:

type
  TDoubleArray = array of Double;
  TDoubleMatrix = array of TDoubleArray;

procedure SwapRows(M: TDoubleMatrix; Row1, Row2: Integer);
var
  Temp: TDoubleArray;
begin
  Temp := M[Row1];
  M[Row1] := M[Row2];
  M[Row2] := Temp;
end;

You need to declare an intermediate type for the row, TDoubleArray, so that you can perform the assignment to Temp in the swap routine.

A 2D constant size array

array [1..M] of array [1..N] of TMyType

is a contiguous block of memory.

A 2D dynamically size array as you have is not. Indeed it can even be ragged in the sense that the rows have different numbers of columns. So you can have, say, a triangular matrix.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Xichen No it is not. I do that out of habit I suppose. It will work perfectly without it. I don't feel there's a compelling reason to do it with or without the var, it's just my habit. –  David Heffernan Mar 18 '11 at 11:14
1  
I have often seen arguments 'erroneously' declared as var because the developer thinks they're modifying the input. This is especially common when objets are passed into methods. var is not needed to modify the state of an object, but use of var actually implies the object can be replaced with a completely different instance. This is a subtle difference between passing by reference and passing by value. A dynamic array is always passed by reference, so var permits you to replace the entire array. –  Craig Young Mar 18 '11 at 18:31
1  
@Craig Yes, that's exactly what's going on in my mind. Reference types make a mockery of var and const though. –  David Heffernan Mar 18 '11 at 18:46
1  
Somehow, I thought dynamic arrays featured the same "copy-on-write" behavior that strings have. Simple test just shown me wrong... It must be noted though that doing the equivalent for a string would require the "var" keyword. Also, using the "const" keyword will usually allow the compiler to do some additional optimisations, in this situation, removing a call to @DynArrayAddRef. –  Ken Bourassa Mar 18 '11 at 21:21
1  
@Ken Exactly. It's precisely the fact that dynamic arrays don't do copy-on-write that makes this all work. Copy-on-write for dynamic arrays would be disastrous because they are often backed by very large blocks of memory. –  David Heffernan Mar 18 '11 at 21:23

A dynamic array is implemented as a pointer to a memory block representing that array. So a two-dimensional dynamic array is actually a pointer to an array of pointers. Thats why swapping the row(-pointer)s actually works.

See David's answer for a cleaner approach.

Update: If you are allowed to use generics you might as well do this:

procedure <SomeClassOrRecord>.SwapRows<T>(var arr: TArray<T>; row0, row1: Integer);
var
  Tmp: T;
begin
  Tmp := arr[row0];
  arr[row0] := arr[row1];
  arr[row1] := Tmp;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
@Uwe: Thank you very much for your helpful comments! –  Xichen Li Mar 18 '11 at 11:14
    
@David: Could you help to comment what do you mean by It won't work if the reference counts of the rows are different.? –  Xichen Li Mar 18 '11 at 11:48
1  
@Xichen No I was getting confused, that statement is not correct. –  David Heffernan Mar 18 '11 at 11:50
1  
As David's comment vanished, I guess he realised that swapping the pointers will also swap the ref counts as they are located in front of the array and not at the pointer to it. Otherwise the ref-counting probably wouldn't work. –  Uwe Raabe Mar 18 '11 at 11:54
    
@David, @Uwe: Thanks! I will switch to David's approach because it does not involve converting pointer to integer and thus I will not need to worry about the IfDef between Integer/Cardinal/NativeInt/NativeUInt/PtrInt/PrtUInt. –  Xichen Li Mar 18 '11 at 12:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.