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For example, if passed the following:

a = []

How do I check to see if a is empty?

share|improve this question
3  
Im right dude.. if is not a is the right answer.. I did not pasted any code on the answer. "If is not a" would be in code if not a: # do something I don't think I need to answer it because its such a simple I just comment on it. – eddwinpaz Feb 2 '15 at 18:07
32  
@eddwinpaz: if is not a is a SyntaxError. is is an binary operator, so it has to have an expression on its left. Probably you meant if not a, but in that case, that was already the accepted and highly-upvoted answer 6 years before your comment. – abarnert May 11 '15 at 20:17
1  
Why do you want to check for emptiness? The most pythonic way to process a list is to iterate through it with a 'for item in a:' loop. Then there is no need to check for empty, just process each item in the list. I wrote this as an answer, but wanted to mention it here as well, due to the number of upvotes. It appears that many people are interested in this and I presume a significant portion never actually need to perform this check. – MrWonderful Oct 16 '15 at 15:41
1  
Checking for emptyness might be useful if you are consuming your list in random order. Something like item = get_item_from_somewhere(); if item in list: {consume_item(item); list.remove(item); if not list: {print('You are done')}} – Vladimir Cravero Oct 21 '15 at 9:24

22 Answers 22

up vote 2085 down vote accepted
if not a:
  print "List is empty"

Using the implicit booleanness of the empty list is quite pythonic.

share|improve this answer
418  
Playing devil's advocate. I don't understand why this idiom is considered pythonic. 'Explicit is better then implicit', correct? This check doesn't seem very explicit about what is is checking. – James McMahon Nov 22 '11 at 6:14
72  
@JamesMcMahon - it's a trade-off between explicitness and type flexibility. generally, "being explicit" means not doing "magical" things. on the other hand, "duck typing" means working with more general interfaces, rather than explicitly checking for types. so something like if a == [] is forcing a particular type (() == [] is False). here, general consensus seems to be that duck typing wins out (in effect, saying that __nonzero__ is the interface for testing emptiness docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#object.__nonzero__) – andrew cooke May 31 '12 at 14:50
55  
Here is another problem with this method (and I'm not calling Patrick out in particular because this is the reoccurring answer here). If a = None, then not a also evaluates to True. So this method doesn't distinguish between [] and None. – James McMahon May 31 '12 at 17:42
117  
This is enshrined in the Programming Recommendations section of PEP 8: "For sequences, (strings, lists, tuples), use the fact that empty sequences are false." – abarnert Mar 28 '13 at 18:58
14  
@Ian Python explicitly calls __bool__() (or __nonzero__() in 2.x) on whatever you pass into an if statement. This shows the intent that truthiness should be used. All containers should return False when empty. This is the standard convention throughout the standard library. The None complaint doesn't seem valid - if you let a None get to that point, you probably don't want the code to execute. If you want to have a distinct behaviour, use a is None first. – Gareth Latty Nov 20 '14 at 21:00

The pythonic way to do it is from the style guide:

For sequences, (strings, lists, tuples), use the fact that empty sequences are false.

Yes: if not seq:
     if seq:

No:  if len(seq):
     if not len(seq):
share|improve this answer
68  
Note that if seq is None you will get the same response as if seq is an empty list; if logic needs to be different in this case you need to explicitly check for None separately. – Patrick Johnmeyer Sep 10 '08 at 15:12
14  
Note that a non-empty numpy array can also be false if it only contains 0. bool(array([[0]])) – endolith Jan 5 '13 at 19:47
8  
@endolith: A numpy array, even a 1D one, isn't (quite) a sequence; it breaks various sequence-related rules (intentionally, and for good reasons). – abarnert Mar 28 '13 at 19:10
2  
@endolith: That's only true for arrays of exactly one element—because such arrays are near-uniformly usable as scalar values within NumPy, it makes sense they would bool-test as scalar values. Otherwise, bool(array([0, 0])) will raise ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all(). – abarnert Dec 3 '14 at 2:01
1  
@endolith: (Except for arrays of exactly zero elements, which are always false.) – abarnert Dec 3 '14 at 2:01

I prefer it explicitly:

if len(li) == 0:
    print 'the list is empty'

This way it's 100% clear that li is a sequence (list) and we want to test its size. My problem with if not li: ... is that it gives the false impression that li is a boolean variable.

share|improve this answer
82  
@RobDeAlmeida - That's not what dynamic typing means, and it isn't true of Python either. isinstance([], bool) == False – spookylukey Mar 27 '13 at 22:24
6  
@Jabba bool(obj) works for every object, even type objects. If you don't define __nonzero__ or __bool__ in your class, the objects are truthy by default. – Kos May 26 '13 at 9:32
15  
@Hugo how does it break polymorphism? This will work as expected for every object implementing __len__() correctly. And I found len(li) == 0 very easy to read and self-documenting: I know the programmer is expecting an object that can be counted and it should be zero. not li tells me nothing: wanted check None? wanted to check zero? True/False? what kind of data is storing/expecting?. I know 600 devs AND Guido thinks not li is the way to go, but it still doesn't make any sense to me. Explicit is better than Implicit – KurzedMetal Jun 5 '13 at 13:25
12  
Completely agree with this answer. When/if someone has to revisit this in 5 years, who comes from another language, or even yourself, in 6 months, the clever "pythonic" arguments will hold very little water, unlike the "clarity" ones. – Thomas Browne Aug 22 '13 at 19:31
6  
I guess it goes with the Zen of Python as it goes with the US Constitution (or any such document btw), each person will pick it's most sacred Amendment. I go for Explicit is better than Implicit. Take a up vote good sir. – Félix Cantournet Oct 15 '13 at 16:54

Other methods don't work for numpy arrays

Other people seem to be generalizing your question beyond just lists, so I thought I'd add a caveat for a different type of sequence that a lot of people might use. You need to be careful with numpy arrays, because other methods that work fine for lists fail for numpy arrays. I explain why below, but in short, the preferred method is to use size.

The "pythonic" way doesn't work I

The "pythonic" way fails with numpy arrays because numpy tries to cast the array to an array of bools, and if x tries to evaluate all of those bools at once for some kind of aggregate truth value. But this doesn't make any sense, so you get a ValueError:

>>> x = numpy.array([0,1])
>>> if x: print("x")
ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all()

The "pythonic" way doesn't work II

But at least the case above tells you that it failed. If you happen to have a numpy array with exactly one element, the if statement will "work", in the sense that you don't get an error. However, if that one element happens to be 0 (or 0.0, or false, ...), the if statement will incorrectly result in false:

>>> x = numpy.array([0,])
>>> if x: print("x")
... else: print("No x")
No x

But clearly x exists and is not empty! This result is not what you wanted.

Using len can give unexpected results

For example,

len( numpy.zeros((1,0)) )

returns 1, even though the array has zero elements.

The numpythonic way

As explained in the scipy FAQ, the correct method in all cases where you know you have a numpy array is to use if x.size:

>>> x = numpy.array([0,1])
>>> if x.size: print("x")
x

>>> x = numpy.array([0,])
>>> if x.size: print("x")
... else: print("No x")
x

>>> x = numpy.zeros((1,0))
>>> if x.size: print("x")
... else: print("No x")
No x

If you're not sure whether it might be a list, a numpy array, or something else, you should combine this approach with the answer @dubiousjim gives to make sure the right test is used for each type. Not very "pythonic", but it turns out that python itself isn't pythonic in this sense either...

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6  
But if the numpy array is not empty, if x: ... seems to cast x to a bool array. If x has one element, this works but is not what you want whenever that one element happens to be 0; if x has multiple elements, python just throws a ValueError. [At least, that's what I get on python 2.7.2 with numpy 1.6.1.] – Mike Feb 21 '12 at 18:32
6  
Yes, that's what we're assuming. But from the rest of this page, the naive pythoner (like I was) wouldn't realize that these methods don't apply to numpy arrays -- especially because python doesn't yell at you if the array has 0 or 1 elements. It's a bit tricky, so I thought I'd add the warning. – Mike Feb 23 '12 at 22:32
2  
It's worth noting that this isn't a flaw in Python, but rather an intentional break of contract by numpy - numpy is a library with a very specific use case, and it has a different 'natural' definition of what truthiness on an array is to the Python standard for containers. It makes sense to optimise for that case, in the way that pathlib uses / to concatenate paths instead of + - it's non-standard, but makes sense in context. – Gareth Latty Feb 16 '15 at 20:47
1  
Agreed. My point is just that it's important to remember that numpy has made the choice to break duck typing for both the very common if x and len(x) idioms -- and sometimes that breakage can be very hard to detect and debug. – Mike Feb 16 '15 at 21:21
4  
I don't know, for me, if a method called len(x) doesn't return the array length because assumptions, it's name is bad designed. – Dalton Aug 20 '15 at 19:54

An empty list is itself considered false in true value testing (see python documentation):

a = []
if a:
     print "not empty"

@Daren Thomas

EDIT: Another point against testing the empty list as False: What about polymorphism? You shouldn't depend on a list being a list. It should just quack like a duck - how are you going to get your duckCollection to quack ''False'' when it has no elements?

Your duckCollection should implement __nonzero__ or __len__ so the if a: will work without problems.

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I have seen the below as preferred, as it will catch the null list as well:

if not a:
    print "The list is empty or null"
share|improve this answer
17  
There is no null list in Python, at most a name bound to a None value – Vinko Vrsalovic Sep 10 '08 at 9:08

Patrick's (accepted) answer is right: if not a: is the right way to do it. Harley Holcombe's answer is right that this is in the PEP 8 style guide. But what none of the answers explain is why it's a good idea to follow the idiom—even if you personally find it's not explicit enough or confusing to Ruby users or whatever.

Python code, and the Python community, has very strong idioms. Following those idioms makes your code easier to read for anyone experienced in Python. And when you violate those idioms, that's a strong signal.

It's true that if not a: doesn't distinguish empty lists from None, or numeric 0, or empty tuples, or empty user-created collection types, or empty user-created not-quite-collection types, or single-element NumPy array acting as scalars with falsey values, etc. And sometimes it's important to be explicit about that. And in that case, you know what you want to be explicit about, so you can test for exactly that. For example, if not a and a is not None: means "anything falsey except None", while if len(a) != 0: means "only empty sequences—and anything besides a sequence is an error here", and so on. Besides testing for exactly what you want to test, this also signals to the reader that this test is important.

But when you don't have anything to be explicit about, anything other than if not a: is misleading the reader. You're signaling something as important when it isn't. (You may also be making the code less flexible, or slower, or whatever, but that's all less important.) And if you habitually mislead the reader like this, then when you do need to make a distinction, it's going to pass unnoticed because you've been "crying wolf" all over your code.

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4  
I understand the rationale about idioms, but it makes me wonder, "Why not be explicit, by default, from the beginning?" When we know that a is a list, how does if len(a) != 0: or if a == []: mislead the reader? One could argue that these say exactly what you mean, nothing more, nothing less, while if not a: is too vague and too general, and you didn't mean to check for 0 or None, when having such values would be an error. – musiphil Aug 12 '15 at 19:09
1  
And I've never found the construct if not a and a is not None: very readable. Why start from a vague catch-all condition, where you never know the complete set of 'all', and exclude some that you don't want, where you can (almost) never be sure that you excluded everything that you don't want? If you know you're checking for a False, how is that more readable than the simple if a == False:? (I admit that in practice I usually prefer separating the sub-conditions as in if a is None: process_None; elif not a: process_False; else: process_True.) – musiphil Aug 12 '15 at 19:16
    
@musiphil You don't always want to process anything other than the falsey case though, and if a is None: pass; elif not a: do_stuff() is an antipattern. – pydsigner Mar 10 at 17:40
    
@pydsigner: Can you please elaborate on the reason why that is an antipattern? – musiphil Apr 3 at 3:36

len() is an O(1) operation for Python lists, strings, dicts, and sets. Python internally keeps track of the number of elements in these containers.

JavaScript has a similar notion of truthy/falsy.

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5  
!![] evaluates to true, and ![] evaluates to false in js, though. – yingted Sep 13 '12 at 0:56
2  
That's all true, but so what? An empty sequence is considered false in exactly the same way a numeric zero is, so why would you do if not len(a) or whatever you're suggesting instead of just if not a? And, for that matter, an empty sequence is also considered false in exactly the same way as False itself. (Well, CPython has a tiny speedup for the latter case—but the time you waste adding your own function call will be more than the time you save with that optimization.) – abarnert Mar 28 '13 at 19:09
3  
I normally write if not a to check for emptiness or falsiness. In certain cases where I'm using None as a sentinel value, I'll check if a is not None. I believe the point I was making about len is O(1) was that you should not be scared of using len when you do need it; unlike C's strlen, it's cheap. – George V. Reilly Apr 22 '13 at 21:19

Python is very uniform about the treatment of emptiness. Given the following:

a = []

.
.
.

if a:
   print("List is not empty.")
else:
   print("List is empty.")

You simply check list a with an "if" statement to see if it is empty. From what I have read and been taught, this is the "Pythonic" way to see if a list or tuple is empty.

share|improve this answer

I had written:

if isinstance(a, (list, some, other, types, i, accept)) and not a:
    do_stuff

which was voted -1. I'm not sure if that's because readers objected to the strategy or thought the answer wasn't helpful as presented. I'll pretend it was the latter, since---whatever counts as "pythonic"---this is the correct strategy. Unless you've already ruled out, or are prepared to handle cases where a is, for example, False, you need a test more restrictive than just if not a:. You could use something like this:

if isinstance(a, numpy.ndarray) and not a.size:
    do_stuff
elif isinstance(a, collections.Sized) and not a:
    do_stuff

the first test is in response to @Mike's answer, above. The third line could also be replaced with:

elif isinstance(a, (list, tuple)) and not a:

if you only want to accept instances of particular types (and their subtypes), or with:

elif isinstance(a, (list, tuple)) and not len(a):

You can get away without the explicit type check, but only if the surrounding context already assures you that a is a value of the types you're prepared to handle, or if you're sure that types you're not prepared to handle are going to raise errors (e.g., a TypeError if you call len on a value for which it's undefined) that you're prepared to handle. In general, the "pythonic" conventions seem to go this last way. Squeeze it like a duck and let it raise a DuckError if it doesn't know how to quack. You still have to think about what type assumptions you're making, though, and whether the cases you're not prepared to handle properly really are going to error out in the right places. The Numpy arrays are a good example where just blindly relying on len or the boolean typecast may not do precisely what you're expecting.

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1  
It's pretty rare that you're going to have an exhaustive list of 6 types that you want to accept and not be flexible for any other types. When you need that kind of thing, you probably want an ABC. In this case, it would probably be one of the stdlib ABCs, like collections.abc.Sized or collections.abc.Sequence, but it might be one you write yourself and register(list) on. If you actually do have code where it's important to distinguish empty from other falsey, and also to distinguish lists and tuples from any other sequences, then this is correct—but I don't believe you have such code. – abarnert Dec 3 '14 at 2:09
4  
The reason people don't like this is because it's entirely unnessesary in most cases. Python is a duck-typed language, and this level of defensive coding actively hinders that. The idea behind Python's type system is that things should work as long as the object passed in functions in the way it needs to. By doing explicit type checks you are forcing the caller to use specific types, going against the very grain of the language. While occasionally such things are necessary (excluding strings from being treated as sequences), such cases are rare and almost always best as blacklists. – Gareth Latty Feb 16 '15 at 20:54
1  
+1 from me. As much as I stamp my feet and pout about how python is a magical duck-typed language, it turns out that that just doesn't always work. Numpy arrays break duck typing in terrible and subtle ways. And since people mix numpy arrays and lists all the time, we have to live in the real world. Sometimes, we just need to be defensive. – Mike Jun 25 '15 at 3:12
    
If you really want to check that the value is exactly [] and not something falsy of another type, then surely if a == []: is called for, rather than mucking about with isinstance. – RemcoGerlich Jul 16 '15 at 13:10
2  
There are some automatic coercions for == though. Off the top of my head, I can't identify any for []. [] == () for instance returns False. But for example frozenset()==set() returns True. So it's worth at least giving some thought to whether some undesired type might be coerced to [] (or vice versa) when doing a == []. – dubiousjim Jul 16 '15 at 13:36

No one seems to have addressed questioning your need to test the list in the first place. Because you provided no additional context, I can imagine that you may not need to do this check in the first place, but are unfamiliar with list processing in Python.

I would argue that the most pythonic way is to not check at all, but rather to just process the list. That way it will do the right thing whether empty or full.

a = []

for item in a:
    <do something with item>

<rest of code>

This has the benefit of handling any contents of a, while not requiring a specific check for emptiness. If a is empty, the dependent block will not execute and the interpreter will fall through to the next line.

If you do actually need to check the array for emptiness, the other answers are sufficient.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't seem to have understood the question. The question is not about checking if an item is in the list or not, but rather to check if the list is empty or not. And, there is enough context in the question, only you were unable to see it. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Mar 10 at 4:13
1  
I thought I had included enough disclaimers to avoid this type of comment. Sorry they were insufficient. The question itself is very brief, and could have been asked by a novice programmer. In that situation, my answer could be very helpful -- that's why I took the time to write it. My answer is not about checking if an item is in a list or not, it is about processing the list whether it is empty or not. In the case of an empty list, it all gets skipped anyway, right? In Python, one rarely actually NEEDS to check for an empty anything, see? – MrWonderful Mar 10 at 4:32
    
My answer is not about checking if an item is in a list or not, it is about processing the list whether it is empty or not – you made me laugh with that, in fact any python beginner will laugh. The question itself is very brief – but is enough to be understood well. See the number of views, it tells you how many people needed answer to this question as is. If you agree to understand these two points, your answer boils down to the last line "If you do actually need to check the array for emptiness, the other answers are sufficient." – I will leave it to you to decide its helpfulness. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Mar 10 at 8:37
    
I suggest you open a tab with the question in view, and another tab with your answer in view, side by side. Read them a few times with a clear head, I think you will understand what I am talking about. Hei, don't take it personally okay. I am just trying to be frank here, no offence. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Mar 10 at 8:39
1  
"I would argue that the most pythonic way is to not check at all, but rather to just process the list." Excellent point! +1 While it is technically true that you didn't answer this precise question, you addressed the XY problem very nicely, and I think that's always a good idea. – Mike Mar 17 at 14:06

some methods what i use:

if not a:
    print "list is empty"

if not bool(a):
    print "list is empty"

if len(a) == 0:
    print "list is empty"
share|improve this answer
6  
The second option seems extremely redundant. Why the explicit conversion to bool? – ApproachingDarknessFish Dec 16 '15 at 10:56

From documentation on truth value testing:

All values other than what is listed here are considered True

  • None
  • False
  • zero of any numeric type, for example, 0, 0.0, 0j.
  • any empty sequence, for example, '', (), [].
  • any empty mapping, for example, {}.
  • instances of user-defined classes, if the class defines a __bool__() or __len__() method, when that method returns the integer zero or bool value False.

As can be seen, empty list [] is falsy, so doing what would be done to a boolean value sounds most efficient:

if not a:
    print('"a" is empty!')
share|improve this answer
1  
if NOT a, that IS actually empty – Neoares Jan 11 at 15:51
    
oops! Corrected it, thanks. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jan 11 at 17:41

You can do:

if not a:
    print "List is empty"

and also,

if len(a) == 0:
    print "list is empty"
share|improve this answer
4  
What new information does this provide not supplied by the other older answers? – cat Mar 6 at 16:54
1  
@tac this is a good answer if you have a better answer post it. – Elenasys Mar 6 at 17:49
    
@tac Agree with ya! – Sнаđошƒаӽ Mar 10 at 4:17
    
@tac Yes, I knew my answer supply same information but all other answer does also same. By the way, I'm a newbie and a college student and giving answers to any questions give me confidence. And I don't think there is any problem in giving answer. – shiminsh Mar 10 at 13:31

I prefer the following:

if a == []:
   print "The list is empty."

Readable and you don't have to worry about calling a function like len() to iterate through the variable. Although I'm not entirely sure what the BigO notation of something like this is... but Python's so blazingly fast I doubt it'd matter unless a was gigantic.

share|improve this answer
11  
Big O notation aside, this is going to be slower, as you instantiate an extra empty list unnecessarily. – Carl Meyer Sep 10 '08 at 13:42
8  
this is less readable than if not a: and breaks more easily. Please don't do it. – devsnd Nov 12 '12 at 11:23
8  
also, btw, len(mylist) doesn't have to iterate the entire list. The length is stored, not calculated. – Ned Batchelder Mar 27 '13 at 21:50
8  
Also, a statement, that Python is blazingly fast, is definitely inaccurate. There are many "faster" languages out there. – Morgan Wilde Jul 25 '13 at 19:44
9  
For what it's worth, I do find this more readable than if not a. From reading this page, I will use if not a as it seems to be the standard, but to me it is less readable than if a == [] or if len(a) == 0. – Richard Shepherd Nov 1 '13 at 22:26

A Python list is considered False when it is empty and True when it is not empty. The following will work quite nicely

    if seq:print('List has items') 
    if not seq:print('List does not have items')

Also

    bool(seq) #will return true if the list has items and false if the list does not.

This will also work for any python sequences.

share|improve this answer
    
What new information does this provide not supplied by the other older answers? – cat Mar 6 at 16:56

Try:

if list:
    #Not empty
else:
    #Empty

if executes the first statement if bool(condition) returns True. bool(condition) returns False if condition is an empty sequence, including a string, 0 or False. If else, it returns True. Actually, I don't know if if works it out like that, but it gets the exact same results.

share|improve this answer
1  
What new information does this provide not supplied by the other older answers? – cat Mar 6 at 16:56

There is of course also

print a or "List is empty"

share|improve this answer
    
That is not at all flexible. The times are rare when that could be used at all effectively. – zondo Feb 16 at 1:22
    
Question was not specific on flexibility. I just wanted to add that this is an option. – spedy Feb 16 at 1:27
    
This is boolish, and very useful and pythonic. – cat Mar 6 at 16:57

Easy way to determine the length of list by using len() functions.

list = []

if len(list) == 0:
    print "length of list is 0 so the list is empty"
else:
    print "List has item or items"
share|improve this answer

we can use bool to check is empty or not

bool(a)
# True or False
share|improve this answer
def list_test (L):
    if   L is None  : print 'list is None'
    elif not L      : print 'list is empty'
    else: print 'list has %d elements' % len(L)

list_test(None)
list_test([])
list_test([1,2,3])

It sometimes good to test for None and for emptiness separately, as those are two different states.. above code produces following output:

list is None 
list is empty 
list has 3 elements

Although it's worth noting that (if not None ) gives true. So if you don't want to separate test for None-ness, you don't have to do that.

def list_test2 (L):
    if not L      : print 'list is empty'
    else: print 'list has %d elements' % len(L)

list_test2(None)
list_test2([])
list_test2([1,2,3])

produces expected

list is empty
list is empty
list has 3 elements
share|improve this answer

You could also do

if len(a_list):
    print 'it's not empty'
share|improve this answer

protected by Srikar Appal Feb 22 '13 at 8:10

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