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I have well-formed xml (open-tags are closed, etc), but there's no dtd, namespaces are not always correct, and there are random entities.

I found an error in some of my xml files, and want to fix this, automatically. Essentially the xml file looks like this:

<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <math><sometag><another>bar</another></sometag></math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>

I want to change this to

<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <m:math><m:sometag><m:another>bar</m:another></m:sometag></m:math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>

I looked at Python elementtree, but according to diveintopython it will not like the fact that it is not validating xml? Also, it is important that nothing should be changed except the prefixing with m:.

Since I'm writing a bunch of shell-scripts to fix files I don't really care for the language, though my current weapon of choice is Python.

Clarifications:

  • the xml does pass when executing xmllint on it
  • I really want a xml solution, because parsing xml using regexes is way to flakey
  • I don't know the names of the tags which can be between <math> and </math>
  • no modification should be made to the document except the prefixing of aforementioned tags with m:
share|improve this question
    
+1 "parsing xml using regexes is way to flakey" –  the Tin Man Mar 19 '11 at 0:41
    
In the end I ended up matching <math> ... </math> with a regex (because then I can use this replacement at a point in the process where the xml is not guaranteed to validate yet): stackoverflow.com/questions/5409161/… . I first tried with Beautifulsoup, but for xml this seems to be safer, and it is spacepreserving, but just loses comments. Thanks everyone! I learned a lot :) –  markijbema Mar 23 '11 at 17:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Ruby, using Nokogiri to massage the XML:

xml = <<EOT
<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <math><sometag><another>bar</another></sometag></math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>
EOT

NAMESPACE = %w[m http://host.com/m]

require 'nokogiri'
doc = Nokogiri::XML::DocumentFragment.parse(xml)

ns = doc.at('foo').add_namespace_definition(*NAMESPACE)

doc.xpath('foo/math | foo/math//*').each { |n| n.namespace = ns }

puts doc.to_xml 

The output looks like:

>> <foo xmlns:m="http://host.com/m">
>>   <bar>      hi </bar>
>>   <!-- ... -->
>>   <m:math><m:sometag><m:another>bar</m:another></m:sometag></m:math>
>>   <!-- ... -->
>> </foo>

If the namespace can't be added to <foo>, then you can munge the tag names directly without messing with namespaces:

xml = <<EOT
<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <math><sometag><another>bar</another></sometag></math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>
EOT

NAMESPACE = %w[m http://host.com/m]

require 'nokogiri'
doc = Nokogiri::XML::DocumentFragment.parse(xml)

doc.xpath('foo/math | foo/math//*').each { |n| n.name = "m:" << n.name }

puts doc.to_xml

# >> <foo>
# >>   <bar>      hi </bar>
# >>   <!-- ... -->
# >>   <m:math><m:sometag><m:another>bar</m:another></m:sometag></m:math>
# >>   <!-- ... -->
# >> </foo>
share|improve this answer

A one-liner in Perl ok?

$ perl -lne'm!<math>.*</math>! and s!<(/)?([^>]+)>!<$1m:$2>!gm;print' 5351382.txt
<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <m:math><m:sometag><m:another>bar</m:another></m:sometag></m:math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>

You shouldn't really parse XML this way... but if the above is sufficient for you... ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Heh, I always appreciate a good oneliner ;) But I'd rather use a XML parsing method, since I know the tags to be well-balanced and such (I used xmllint to check that the xml is well-balanced). Such text-manipulation methods are tricky, for instance, your solution replaces <!-- --> by <m:!-- -->. So I'd rather do it with a xml library solution. –  markijbema Mar 18 '11 at 12:28
    
I'm really intrigued by this m!! and s!!! construction. Could you maybe explain how that works, or point to a site which explains it? I've made quite some perl oneliners, but didn't know this construct. –  markijbema Mar 18 '11 at 13:29
    
you don't have to use / as a regexp delimiter in Perl, you can use any single character, or balanced pairs: s#foo#bar# or s{foo}{bar} or even s<<math>><<m:math>> (the regexp engine balances the brackets, so the outer brackets delimit the regexp and the inner ones are part of the pattern) –  mirod Mar 18 '11 at 13:50
    
For a good valid solution (with an XML parser) see @mirod's response –  mfontani Mar 18 '11 at 15:04

Your best bet will probably be to find a non-validating XSLT processor and pass it something like: <xsl:template match="math"> <m:math> <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/> </m:math> </xsl:template>

share|improve this answer
    
But that will not add the m: prefix to the tags inside the <math> tag, right? And I don't know the names of the tags which can occur between <math> and </math> either.. –  markijbema Mar 18 '11 at 13:23
    
Uh, yeah, that's exactly what it does. And it doesn't matter what's inside them, that's taken care of by the select="@*|node()" clause. –  TMN Mar 18 '11 at 13:29

In Perl you could use XML::Twig, for example like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::Twig;

XML::Twig->new( twig_roots => { math => \&add_prefix },
                twig_print_outside_roots => 1,
              )
         ->parse( \*DATA);

sub add_prefix
  { my( $t, $math)= @_;
    foreach my $m ( $math, $math->descendants( '#ELT'))
      { $m->set_tag( "m:" . $m->tag); }
    $t->flush;
  }

__DATA__
<foo>
  <bar>      hi </bar>
  <!-- ... -->
  <math><sometag><another>bar</another></sometag></math>
  <!-- ... -->
</foo>
share|improve this answer

Perhaps BeautifulSoup will serve you better than Python's built-in stuff. It's mainly designed for HTML, but can do XML as well, although...

The BeautifulSoup class is full of web-browser-like heuristics for divining the intent of HTML authors. But XML doesn't have a fixed tag set, so those heuristics don't apply. So BeautifulSoup doesn't do XML very well.

It might not be perfect, but probably fares better on unspecified or invalid XML than a strict parser does. Another point in its favour is that it gives you Unicode, dammit.

share|improve this answer
    
But does it retain the original layout wrt spacing etc? I'm in the middle of a pipeline, and don't have much control over what happens with the file after this, nor do I know what exactly happens. Therefore I need to err on the safe side, and use only operations which do not change spacing/comments/indentation, or anything. –  markijbema Mar 18 '11 at 16:04
    
No, I don't think it makes any attempt to preserve whitespace... sorry. –  Thomas Mar 18 '11 at 16:13
    
"The prettify method adds strategic newlines and spacing to make the structure of the document obvious. It also strips out text nodes that contain only whitespace, which might change the meaning of an XML document. The str and unicode functions don't strip out text nodes that contain only whitespace, and they don't add any whitespace between nodes either. " So I think it does, mostly, if you just use str(soup). –  markijbema Mar 23 '11 at 17:01

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