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I want to calculate difference between 2 dates in hours/minutes/seconds.

I have a slight problem with my code here it is :

String dateStart = "11/03/14 09:29:58";
String dateStop = "11/03/14 09:33:43";

// Custom date format
SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("yy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss");  

Date d1 = null;
Date d2 = null;
try {
    d1 = format.parse(dateStart);
    d2 = format.parse(dateStop);
} catch (ParseException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}    

// Get msec from each, and subtract.
long diff = d2.getTime() - d1.getTime();
long diffSeconds = diff / 1000;         
long diffMinutes = diff / (60 * 1000);         
long diffHours = diff / (60 * 60 * 1000);                      
System.out.println("Time in seconds: " + diffSeconds + " seconds.");         
System.out.println("Time in minutes: " + diffMinutes + " minutes.");         
System.out.println("Time in hours: " + diffHours + " hours."); 

This should produce :

Time in seconds: 45 seconds.
Time in minutes: 3 minutes.
Time in hours: 0 hours.

However I get this result :

Time in seconds: 225 seconds.
Time in minutes: 3 minutes.
Time in hours: 0 hours.

Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong here ?

share|improve this question
    
A similar question found: stackoverflow.com/questions/625433/… –  Yves Martin Feb 7 '12 at 13:43
1  
There is a better way to do it: stackoverflow.com/a/15541322/562769 –  moose Mar 21 '13 at 7:52

14 Answers 14

up vote 35 down vote accepted

try

long diffSeconds = diff / 1000 % 60;  
long diffMinutes = diff / (60 * 1000) % 60; 
share|improve this answer

If you are able to use external libraries I would recommend you to use joda-time.

http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/

Example for between calculation:

Seconds.between(startDate, endDate);
Days.between(startDate, endDate);
share|improve this answer
5  
Please note that if you are dealing with 2 java.util.Date objects, then you'd need to use Days.daysBetween(LocalDate.fromDateFields(startDate), LocalDate.fromDateFields(endDate)); –  user799188 Oct 9 '12 at 3:00
    
I've created an example how to use Joda time: stackoverflow.com/a/15541322/562769 –  moose Mar 21 '13 at 7:53

I would prefer to use suggested java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit class.

long diff = d2.getTime() - d1.getTime();//as given

long seconds = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(diff);
long minutes = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(diff); 
share|improve this answer
    
I consider this to be a much better answer than the accepted one. –  Mark Mar 10 at 14:47
    
@Mark I disagree. You missed the point of the question. Despite the fact that he uses the phrase "Time in seconds" in the rest of the post he makes it clear that he doesn't actually want a plain conversion, he wants remainders. This is less efficient than the accepted answer (employing a method call, which even in JVM bytecode is a few instructions), less clear (it's longer, and frankly if something finds "1000" or "60" to be magic numbers in that context, they're not working with a full deck) and, pivotally, it doesn't do what the OP wanted. –  Parthian Shot Aug 8 at 17:25

Since Java 5, you can use java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit to avoid the use of Magic Numbers like 1000 and 60 in your code.

By the way, you should take care to leap seconds in your computation: the last minute of a year may have an additional leap second so it indeed lasts 60 seconds instead of expected 59 seconds. The ISO specification even plan for possibly 61 seconds. You can find detail in java.util.Date javadoc.

share|improve this answer
1  
Unless there's a good business justification for including those stray leap seconds, you're pretty safe treating them as a fun, but immaterial, scientific curiosity. –  phatfingers Apr 16 '13 at 2:44
    
I agree the "leap second" is a minor trick. But what about day-light saving or time zone differences ? –  Yves Martin May 3 '13 at 10:28
    
@YvesMartin "time zone differences" Look at his date format. There is no place for time zone. If he did want this to work across timezones he'd have bigger problems. Daylight savings is an issue, though. –  Parthian Shot Aug 8 at 17:29

difference-between-two-dates-in-java

Extracted the code from the link

public class TimeDiff {
    /**
     * (For testing purposes)
     *
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Date d1 = new Date();
        try { Thread.sleep(750); } catch(InterruptedException e) { /* ignore */ }      
        Date d0 = new Date(System.currentTimeMillis() - (1000*60*60*24*3)); // About 3 days ago
        long[] diff = TimeDiff.getTimeDifference(d0, d1);

        System.out.printf("Time difference is %d day(s), %d hour(s), %d minute(s), %d second(s) and %d millisecond(s)\n",
                diff[0], diff[1], diff[2], diff[3], diff[4]);
        System.out.printf("Just the number of days = %d\n",
                TimeDiff.getTimeDifference(d0, d1, TimeDiff.TimeField.DAY));
    }

    /**
     * Calculate the absolute difference between two Date without
     * regard for time offsets
     *
     * @param d1 Date one
     * @param d2 Date two
     * @param field The field we're interested in out of
     * day, hour, minute, second, millisecond
     *
     * @return The value of the required field
     */
    public static long getTimeDifference(Date d1, Date d2, TimeField field) {
        return TimeDiff.getTimeDifference(d1, d2)[field.ordinal()];
    }

    /**
     * Calculate the absolute difference between two Date without
     * regard for time offsets
     *
     * @param d1 Date one
     * @param d2 Date two
     * @return The fields day, hour, minute, second and millisecond
     */
    public static long[] getTimeDifference(Date d1, Date d2) {
        long[] result = new long[5];
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
        cal.setTime(d1);

        long t1 = cal.getTimeInMillis();
        cal.setTime(d2);

        long diff = Math.abs(cal.getTimeInMillis() - t1);
        final int ONE_DAY = 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24;
        final int ONE_HOUR = ONE_DAY / 24;
        final int ONE_MINUTE = ONE_HOUR / 60;
        final int ONE_SECOND = ONE_MINUTE / 60;

        long d = diff / ONE_DAY;
        diff %= ONE_DAY;

        long h = diff / ONE_HOUR;
        diff %= ONE_HOUR;

        long m = diff / ONE_MINUTE;
        diff %= ONE_MINUTE;

        long s = diff / ONE_SECOND;
        long ms = diff % ONE_SECOND;
        result[0] = d;
        result[1] = h;
        result[2] = m;
        result[3] = s;
        result[4] = ms;

        return result;
    }

    public static void printDiffs(long[] diffs) {
        System.out.printf("Days:         %3d\n", diffs[0]);
        System.out.printf("Hours:        %3d\n", diffs[1]);
        System.out.printf("Minutes:      %3d\n", diffs[2]);
        System.out.printf("Seconds:      %3d\n", diffs[3]);
        System.out.printf("Milliseconds: %3d\n", diffs[4]);
    }

    public static enum TimeField {DAY,
        HOUR,
        MINUTE,
        SECOND,
        MILLISECOND;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good. Time offset is important - even if difference is computed based on the same offset, but also any day-light saving difference between two "calendar date" has also an impact on result. You should have used java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit for your constants. –  Yves Martin May 3 '13 at 10:26

This is more of a maths problem than a java problem basically.

The result you receive is correct. This because 225 seconds is 3 minutes (when doing an integral division). What you want is the this:

  • divide by 1000 to get the number of seconds -> rest is milliseconds
  • divide that by 60 to get number of minutes -> rest are seconds
  • divide that by 60 to get number of hours -> rest are minutes

or in java:

int millis = diff % 1000;
diff/=1000;
int seconds = diff % 60;
diff/=60;
int minutes = diff % 60;
diff/=60;
hours = diff;
share|improve this answer

Create a Date object using the diffence between your times as a constructor,
then use Calendar methods to get values ..

Date diff = new Date(d2.getTime() - d1.getTime());

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.setTime(diff);
int hours = calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);
int minutes = calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
int seconds = calendar.get(Calendar.SECOND);
share|improve this answer
3  
Those methods are deprecated. –  djechlin Feb 14 '13 at 23:15
1  
works fine, but you must not forgett to set TimeZone: Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); –  amra Jul 11 '13 at 13:19

Try this for a friendly representation of time differences (in milliseconds):

String friendlyTimeDiff(long timeDifferenceMilliseconds) {
    long diffSeconds = timeDifferenceMilliseconds / 1000;
    long diffMinutes = timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 1000);
    long diffHours = timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 60 * 1000);
    long diffDays = timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 60 * 1000 * 24);
    long diffWeeks = timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 60 * 1000 * 24 * 7);
    long diffMonths = (long) (timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 60 * 1000 * 24 * 30.41666666));
    long diffYears = (long) (timeDifferenceMilliseconds / (60 * 60 * 1000 * 24 * 365));

    if (diffSeconds < 1) {
        return "less than a second";
    } else if (diffMinutes < 1) {
        return diffSeconds + " seconds";
    } else if (diffHours < 1) {
        return diffMinutes + " minutes";
    } else if (diffDays < 1) {
        return diffHours + " hours";
    } else if (diffWeeks < 1) {
        return diffDays + " days";
    } else if (diffMonths < 1) {
        return diffWeeks + " weeks";
    } else if (diffYears < 1) {
        return diffMonths + " months";
    } else {
        return diffYears + " years";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is my code.

import java.util.Date;

// to calculate difference between two days
public class DateDifference {

// to calculate difference between two dates in milliseconds
public long getDateDiffInMsec(Date da, Date db) {
    long diffMSec = 0;
    diffMSec = db.getTime() - da.getTime();
    return diffMSec;
}

// to convert Milliseconds into DD HH:MM:SS format.
public String getDateFromMsec(long diffMSec) {
    int left = 0;
    int ss = 0;
    int mm = 0;
    int hh = 0;
    int dd = 0;
    left = (int) (diffMSec / 1000);
    ss = left % 60;
    left = (int) left / 60;
    if (left > 0) {
        mm = left % 60;
        left = (int) left / 60;
        if (left > 0) {
            hh = left % 24;
            left = (int) left / 24;
            if (left > 0) {
                dd = left;
            }
        }
    }
    String diff = Integer.toString(dd) + " " + Integer.toString(hh) + ":"
            + Integer.toString(mm) + ":" + Integer.toString(ss);
    return diff;

}
}
share|improve this answer

long diffSeconds = (diff / 1000)%60;
try this and let me know if it works correctly...

share|improve this answer

Well, I'll try yet another code sample:

/**
 * Calculates the number of FULL days between to dates
 * @param startDate must be before endDate
 * @param endDate must be after startDate
 * @return number of day between startDate and endDate
 */
public static int daysBetween(Calendar startDate, Calendar endDate) {
    long start = startDate.getTimeInMillis();
    long end = endDate.getTimeInMillis();
    // It's only approximation due to several bugs (@see java.util.Date) and different precision in Calendar chosen
    // by user (ex. day is time-quantum).
    int presumedDays = (int) TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toDays(end - start);
    startDate.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, presumedDays);
    // if we still didn't reach endDate try it with the step of one day
    if (startDate.before(endDate)) {
        startDate.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
        ++presumedDays;
    }
    // if we crossed endDate then we must go back, because the boundary day haven't completed yet
    if (startDate.after(endDate)) {
        --presumedDays;
    }
    return presumedDays;
}
share|improve this answer
// d1, d2 are dates
long diff = d2.getTime() - d1.getTime();

long diffSeconds = diff / 1000 % 60;
long diffMinutes = diff / (60 * 1000) % 60;
long diffHours = diff / (60 * 60 * 1000) % 24;
long diffDays = diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

System.out.print(diffDays + " days, ");
System.out.print(diffHours + " hours, ");
System.out.print(diffMinutes + " minutes, ");
System.out.print(diffSeconds + " seconds.");
share|improve this answer

Joda-Time 2.3 library offers already-debugged code for this chore.

// © 2013 Basil Bourque. This source code may be used freely forever by anyone taking full responsibility for doing so.
// import org.joda.time.*;
// import org.joda.time.format.*;

// Specify a time zone rather than rely on default.
// Necessary to handle Daylight Saving Time (DST) and other anomalies.
DateTimeZone timeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "America/Montreal" );

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "yy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss" ).withZone( timeZone );

DateTime dateTimeStart = formatter.parseDateTime( "11/03/14 09:29:58" );
DateTime dateTimeStop = formatter.parseDateTime( "11/03/14 09:33:43" );
Period period = new Period( dateTimeStart, dateTimeStop );

PeriodFormatter periodFormatter = PeriodFormat.getDefault();
String output = periodFormatter.print( period );

System.out.println( "output: " + output );

When run…

output: 3 minutes and 45 seconds
share|improve this answer
Date startTime = new Date();
//...
//... lengthy jobs
//...
Date endTime = new Date();
long diff = endTime.getTime() - startTime.getTime();
String hrDateText = DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(diff, "d 'day(s)' H 'hour(s)' m 'minute(s)' s 'second(s)' ");
System.out.println("Duration : " + hrDateText);


You can use Apache Commons Duration Format Utils. It formats like SimpleDateFormatter

Output:

0 days(s) 0 hour(s) 0 minute(s) 1 second(s)

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