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In a school assignment I'm supposed to complete a method that should return an array of node elements in ascendig order. The nodes are assembled in a binary search tree, so to sort them correct, I got a tip to create a recursive method to do the job.

The problem is that this doesn't even yield all the elements in the collection according to the test output (java.lang.AssertionError: toArray() does not return all the elements in the collection.)

I couldn't come up with any other way to deal with the array, and I'm not quite sure if the recursion even works. Any help is much appreciated. Below is my code:

public class BinarySearchTree<E extends Comparable<E>> implements
    IfiCollection<E> {

    Node root;
    Node current;
    int size = 0;
    int i = 0;

    public class Node {
    E obj;
    Node left, right;

    public Node(E e) {
        obj = e;
    }

    } // END class Node

    [...]

    public E[] toArray(E[] a) {

    Node n = root;

    a = sort(n, a);
    return a;

    }

    public E[] sort(Node n, E[] a) { //, int idx, E[] a) {

    if (n.left != null) {
        current = n.left;
        sort(current, a);
    }


    a[i] = current.obj;
    i++;

    if (n.right != null) {
        current = n.right;
        sort(current, a);
        }

    return a;

    } // END public Node sort

    [...]

} // END class BinarySearchTree

Test output:

java.lang.AssertionError: toArray() does not return all the elements in the collection.: TestPerson("Bender").compareTo(TestPerson("Fry")) == 0 expected:true but was:false at inf1010.assignment.IfiCollectionTest.assertCompareToEquals(IfiCollectionTest.java:74) at inf1010.assignment.IfiCollectionTest.assertCompareToEquals(IfiCollectionTest.java:83) at inf1010.assignment.IfiCollectionTest.assertCompareToEqualsNoOrder(IfiCollectionTest.java:100) at inf1010.assignment.IfiCollectionTest.toArray(IfiCollectionTest.java:202)

protected void assertCompareToEquals(TestPerson actual,
        TestPerson expected, String msg) {
            assertTrue(actual.compareTo(expected) == 0, String.format( // l:74
            "%s: %s.compareTo(%s) == 0", msg, actual, expected));
}

    [...]

protected void assertCompareToEquals(TestPerson[] actual,
        TestPerson[] expected, String msg) {
    for (int i = 0; i < actual.length; i++) {
        TestPerson a = actual[i];
        TestPerson e = expected[i];
        assertCompareToEquals(a, e, msg); // l:83
    }
}

    [...]

protected void assertCompareToEqualsNoOrder(TestPerson[] actual,
        TestPerson[] expected, String msg) {
    assertEquals(actual.length, expected.length, msg);

    TestPerson[] actualElements = new TestPerson[actual.length];
    System.arraycopy(actual, 0, actualElements, 0, actual.length);

    TestPerson[] expectedElements = new TestPerson[expected.length];
    System.arraycopy(expected, 0, expectedElements, 0, expected.length);

    Arrays.sort(expectedElements);
    Arrays.sort(actualElements);

    assertCompareToEquals(actualElements, expectedElements, msg); // l:100
}

    [...]

@Test(dependsOnGroups = { "collection-core" },
    description="Tests if method toArray yields all the elements inserted in the collection in sorted order with smallest item first.")
public void toArray() {
    TestPerson[] actualElements = c.toArray(new TestPerson[c.size()]);

    for (int i = 0; i < actualElements.length; i++) {
        assertNotNull(actualElements[i],
                "toArray() - array element at index " + i + " is null");
    }

    TestPerson[] expectedElements = allElementsAsArray();
    assertCompareToEqualsNoOrder(actualElements, expectedElements, // l:202
            "toArray() does not return all the elements in the collection.");

    Arrays.sort(expectedElements);
    assertCompareToEquals(actualElements, expectedElements,
            "toArray() does not return the elements in sorted order with "
                    + "the smallest elements first.");


    TestPerson[] inArr = new TestPerson[NAMES.length + 1];
    inArr[NAMES.length] = new TestPerson("TEMP");
    actualElements = c.toArray(inArr);
    assertNull(actualElements[NAMES.length],
            "The the element in the array immediately following the "
            + "end of the list is not set to null");
}

I don't know if I should post more of the test code, it's quite extensive, and it might be a little too much for one post?

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1  
Your source is incomplete. Where are current and i declared? –  RoToRa Mar 18 '11 at 12:06
    
Please post the input you tested with and the output you got. –  Péter Török Mar 18 '11 at 12:07
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, I think the problem is your use of the "global" variable current. The way it is set, doesn't make much sense. You don't need to anyway, because the "current" Node is the one that is provided in the parameters.

Also you should consider renaming your function. You aren't sorting anything here, just collecting the contents of the tree, so a name such as collect would be more suitable.

public E[] toArray(E[] a) {
  Node n = root;
  a = collect(n, a);
  return a;
}

public E[] collect(Node n, E[] a) {

  if (n.left != null) {
    // If there is a left (smaller) value, we go there first
    collect(n.left, a);
  }


  // Once we've got all left (smaller) values we can
  // collect the value of out current Node.
  a[i] = n.obj;
  i++;

  if (n.right != null) {
    // And if there is a right (larger) value we get it next
    collect(n.right, a);
  }

  return a;
}

(Disclaimer: I haven't tested this)


Alternative implementation without the global index:

public E[] toArray(E[] a) {
  Node n = root;
  collect(n, a, 0);
  return a;
}

public int collect(Node n, E[] a, int i) {

  if (n.left != null) {
    // If there is a left (smaller) value, we go there first
    i = collect(n.left, a, i);
  }


  // Once we've got all left (smaller) values we can
  // collect the value of out current Node.
  a[i] = n.obj;
  i++;

  if (n.right != null) {
    // And if there is a right (larger) value we get it next
    i = collect(n.right, a, i);
  }

  return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, ofcourse, the current node was clearly redundant :) I seem to be one step closer to solving this. Now I just get an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException. That I can work with ;) –  Aksel Mathias Mar 18 '11 at 13:15
1  
@Askel I don't see the point in returning a in the collect method when you aren't doing anything with it. Simple example... root with one left node... you call collect(n, a) -> collect(n.left, a) -> a[0] = n.left.obj -> i++ -> return a to first collect call on stack -> a[1] = n.obj -> return a... Wouldnt making the connect method void, since your toArray will return the array, make more sense? –  DTing Mar 18 '11 at 13:23
    
@kriegar: Good point. I was considering that and let it return the index instead, so you could get rid of the "global" i. –  RoToRa Mar 18 '11 at 13:31
    
@Askel: Could it be that you are calling toArray multiple times? In that case the Out of Bounds exception is because i isn't being reset, which is one of the dangers of using a "global" variable. I've added a alternative implementation, that get's rid of the problem. –  RoToRa Mar 18 '11 at 13:39
    
Yes! That was exactly it. Thanks alot! –  Aksel Mathias Mar 18 '11 at 14:07
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I think where you are confused is that if you check out how a binary search tree works, is that it is always sorted. You start at your root node, and then as you insert a new node, it inserts it into the appropriate position (i.e. to the left or the right) depending on the values. So you should not have to call sort to begin with. So I would start there, and read up on binary search trees. For example wikipedia has a decent article.

Update: Ignore my comment you should not need to do that either. Say you insert 8, 3, 7, 9, 12, 2, 10, 1 into the tree in that order. It should end up looking like this:

      8
     / \
    3   9
   / \   \
  2   7   12
 /       /
1       10

If you look at it that means to get them in order, start at the root, then if it has a node to the left got to the left, if not, return itself, and go to the right if it has a value. Repeating this for each node you encounter.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, and I'm certain that I've added the elements correctly. At least the add()-method passed the tests. But still, one would need some sort of algoritm to add the nodes containing the elements to the array correctly(from smallest to biggest)? –  Aksel Mathias Mar 18 '11 at 12:32
    
@Aksel What you are suggesting is more like sorting the numbers twice. Why not write a method in your binary search tree that returns the min value in the tree (the far left each time) and removes it from the tree. You build your array with those values as you go, until it is empty. –  jschoen Mar 18 '11 at 12:48
    
Maybe that would be a good idea, but I got the recursive method tip from my teacher, and it just bug me that I don't get it. And in the wikipedia article you mentioned it is described how the elements of the tree can be retrieved in order, in the fassion I would like to achieve. –  Aksel Mathias Mar 18 '11 at 13:01
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I see you have the code

if (n.left != null) {
        current = n.left;
        sort(current, a);
  }

but I can't seem to find at which point you set current back at the current node so that when you do

a[i] = current.obj;

you get the correct result. That's probably why you're not getting all the results. In any case I don't see (at least from the code fragments you have posted) why current needs to be a class variable and not just declared in the sort method. In general you shouldn't be using class variables if you don't really need them.

Edit: You can either set current back to the node you are processing after calling sort on the left child like this

current = n;
a[i] = current.obj;
i++;

Or not use current at all in which case you'd have something like

if (n.left != null)
    sort(n.left, a);
a[i] = n.obj;
i++;
if (n.right != null)
    sort(n.right, a);
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please elaborate on setting the current back at the current node? –  Aksel Mathias Mar 18 '11 at 13:06
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http://cs.armstrong.edu/liang/intro8e/html/BinaryTree.html

The easiest way to do what you are looking for is to traverse the tree inorder and append to an ArrayList. To get the array you can call the .toArray() method of the arrayList.

If you can't use an arraylist, declare an index and an array outside the inordertraversal and increment, you will need to know how many elements are in the tree to declare your array.

pseudo code:

variables:
arraysize = root.count()
E[] inOrderNodeArray = new E[arraysize]
int index = 0

inorder traversal:
void inorder(Node n) {
    if (n) {
        inorder(n.left)
        inOrderNodeArray[index] = n
        index++
        inorder(n.right)
    }
}
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