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Which of these is more efficient in terms of speed (number of lines of code generated).

var x=obj.mem;
x.do1();
x.do2();

or

obj.mem.do1();
obj.mem.do2();

I just wrote those in a generic pattern. Specifically, if I have to access a member( or a member of a member ) , is it better to assign the common part to a variable and then use that variable or to call it directly as shown in the second case.

I'm concerned mainly about C++ and JavaScript (if it matters). Thank You.

EDIT-> PS.I did not ask a common answer. I understand that Javascript is an interpreter language while C++ is compiler based. The little knowledge I have of JavaScript is self taught and we learned C++ for 2 years at school (and that too Turbo C++) and the rest is again self taught. So, forgive me for the confusion. I was expecting a general result assuming that the constructs are valid and considering any possible variations. Anyway, my major doubts were cleared. Thanks.

Conclusion: JS is faster with local variables (though negligible) and C++ will probably optimise to get almost equal results.

Thank You for all the input.

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1  
-1 You cannot ask on a construct in two such unrelated languages. As a matter of fact, the meaning of the same code snippet (filling the blanks so that it actually compiles) might be completely different! –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '11 at 13:24
    
-1 For the same reasons as David - your code probably isn't valid C++ (unless you've #defined var) and if you did correct the first code sample it probably wouldn't have the same effect as the first. –  Joe Gauterin Mar 18 '11 at 13:57
    
-1 In C++, assuming some reasonable definition of var, the two code snippets have different semantics. It doesn't matter which is faster -- they do different things. –  Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 15:04
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas @Joe Gauterin @Rob Adams I disagree. I think he should have asked for even more languages. Why not talk about the theory of it? And I don't think anyone suggested this was meant to be valid C++. JavaScript or just pseudocode is ok too. There's no need to write out the same bit of code over and over in every language you know just to ask a question on SO. –  Buh Buh Mar 18 '11 at 17:04
    
@Buh Buh: The problem is that the code in question is not compatible with both languages, and the answer is very dependent on the language. I don't know Javascript, in Java where everything are references they are the same, in C# it depends on whether the object is a struct or class, in C++ it depends on the definition of var (that in c++ must be a declared type, but it could have a hidden reference, so it is still unanswerable... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '11 at 22:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Local variables in JavaScript are faster because The further into the chain, the slower the resolution.

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Take a look at slides 17 and 18. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 18 '11 at 12:47
    
Great Resource!! –  Diff.Thinkr Mar 19 '11 at 6:27

In JavaScript the first one is faster. You would think that there shouldn't be much difference, but I ran into this while developing Dreamweaver extensions (they use JavaScript) and there is a huge difference.

I advise you to avoid long chains.

Benchmarking:

var x = {y:{z:null}};
var start = (new Date).getTime();
for(var i=0;i<1000000;i++){
    x.y.z = i;
}
alert((new Date).getTime()-start);

vs.

var x = {y:{z:null}};
var start = (new Date).getTime();
var q = x.y;
for(var i=0;i<1000000;i++){
    q.z = i;
}
alert((new Date).getTime()-start);

The second one is about 10% faster in my Firefox. But keep in mind that this is a minimalist scenario. If you work with larger object and deeper levels the difference will probably go up.

And of course it does:

var x = {a:{b:{c:{d:{y:{z:null}}}}}};
var start = (new Date).getTime();
for(var i=0;i<1000000;i++){
    x.a.b.c.d.y.z = i;
}
alert((new Date).getTime()-start);

vs.

var x = {a:{b:{c:{d:{y:{z:null}}}}}};
var start = (new Date).getTime();
var q = x.a.b.c.d.y;
for(var i=0;i<1000000;i++){
    q.z = i;
}
alert((new Date).getTime()-start);

Is 30% enough for it not to be negligible?

Regards,
Alin

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+1 for providing benchmarking code. –  Michael Kjörling Mar 18 '11 at 12:51
    
@Michael Kjörling Try the second set. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 18 '11 at 12:54
    
Are you sure that is a fair test? var q = x.a.b.c.d.y.z; q = 5; is not the same as x.a.b.c.d.y.z = 5; Is it? –  Buh Buh Mar 18 '11 at 14:19
    
No Alin, 30% is not enough to be negligible. Normally a page doesn't set a value on an object 1000000 times. If you do, then optimize. But in normal situations: don't. @Buh Buh: it is the same, object elements are pass-by-reference in JS. –  orlp Mar 18 '11 at 14:23
1  
Woops, what I said about pass-by-reference was BS, ignore it :) –  orlp Mar 18 '11 at 17:39

In C++, with the compiler optimiser turned on, they should both perform identically (at least on average).

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Depends on the definition of var, is it a reference or a value, in the later case, not only it will be slower but it will have complete different semantics. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '11 at 22:15
    
@David: good point: I would hope a pointer or reference would be used where sensible, but even in other cases the optimiser may well remove the copying if there's no side effects. –  Tony D Mar 19 '11 at 20:48

At least in JavaScript, by assigning the property to a local variable, you avoid looking up obj in a potential high (like global) scope, which can be "slow".

The rule of thumb for JS is: If you have to access a non-local object more than once, make it local.

Same for nested properties. Instead of accessing a.b.c.d.x and a.b.c.d.y, it is better to assign a.b.c.d to a variable, if possible.

If you are interested in performance in general, have a look at the book High Performance JavaScript.

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Depending in the type of x, the first form might not even compile (if the type has no copy-constructor).

I would probably go for:

the_type& x = obj.mem;
x.do1();
x.do2();

Note that accessing members from the outside is a very bad idea. It goes against one of the basic principles of object-oriented programming: encapsulation. Here is what you really should be doing:

obj.do_stuff();

Of course, it is hard to give any more advice without knowing what do1, do2 and mem actually are.

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In C++ any sub-decent compiler will optimize the difference away.

In Javascript the difference should be neglectible. Don't waste your time on stuff like that unless you are building a library to be used by millions like jQuery.

EDIT

Apparently some people don't understand what I mean with neglectible in the argument above. Yes, you can benchmark this stuff and see that it's 30% faster to create local variables. But 1.30 * 0.003 milliseconds is not noticeable, thus neglectible, unless it's executed millions of times, for example in a library.

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The difference is absolutely minimal, and neglectable.

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If there is a difference, it might not be neglectable for every use case. Please elaborate. –  bjoernz Mar 18 '11 at 12:31
    
There is a difference and it definitely isn't neglectable. –  Alin Purcaru Mar 18 '11 at 12:33

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