Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was implementing an echo command using the system() function. The argument for the echo command comes from a command line argument. But when used ';' in the argument it is showing the directory listing. What should i do to avoid it? Is it because of command injection in my program?


update: code added from comment

#include<string.h> 
#include<stdio.h> 
#include<stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) { 
    char cmd[50] = "echo "; 
    strcat(cmd,argv[1]); 
    system(cmd); 
} 

I could compile the code but while executing if i give the command line argument as eg: './a.out hello;ls ' then directory listing is happening.

share|improve this question
6  
Do you have a reason for not using printf() instead of system("echo");? –  jonescb Mar 18 '11 at 12:50
    
when i tried to use printf, it is also prints the same error. Directory listing is happening. –  Bithin Mar 18 '11 at 12:53
    
Can you show us some code so we know what you are talking about? –  Starkey Mar 18 '11 at 12:53
    
#include<string.h> #include<stdio.h> #include<stdlib.h> int main(int argc, char **argv) { char cmd[50] = "echo "; strcat(cmd,argv[1]); system(cmd); } /*I could compile the code but while executing if i give the command line argument as eg: './a.out hello;ls ' then directory listing is happening. */ –  Bithin Mar 18 '11 at 13:03
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

[can't respond to other answers yet, so reposting the question] "Is possible to get the argument with ';', without using '\' in the command line argument. Is possible for me to include a '\' from my program after getting argv?"

No, it is not possible. The interpretation of ";" is done by the shell before getting to your program, so unless you escape at the call, your program will never be aware of the ";". i.e. PROG1 parms ; PROG2

will cause the shell (which is interpreting what you type) to do the following:

start PROG1 and pass it parms.

once PROG1 is done, start PROG2

There are a number of special characters which the shell will take over by default and your program will never see: * for wildcards, | for pipes, & for parallel execution, etc... None of these will be seen by the program being run, they just tell the shell to do special things. Alternatively to using the "\", you can enclose your parameter in single or double quotes (which are different, but for your example will both work). i.e.: ./a.out "hello;ls" ./a.out 'hello;ls'

Note that these will work for the printf option, if you call "system" you are in effect telling C to start a shell to run what you are passing in, so the input will once again be subject to shell interpretation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why are you trying to use a shell access (which is exactly what System() does), and than attempt to restrict it?

If you need for some reason to use 'echo', please build your own execve() parameters, and launch /bin/echo directly.. this way you can restrict the damage only to the tasks 'echo' can do.

share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented 'echo' using execve(), but i have given the input through the command line and if the command line arugment contains a ';' then directory listing happen. Is it because of any properties of the linux OS? –  Bithin Mar 18 '11 at 13:26
add comment

When attempting to run your program with the command ./a.out hello;ls, you are actually providing the shell with two separate commands that it executes in sequence. First the shell runs a.out with the command line parameter "hello" in argv[1], which prints it out using echo. Then your program exits, and the shell runs the next command, ls, and displays the directory listing.

If you want to pass that string to the program as a command line parameter, you need to escape the special shell character ;, so the shell does not parse it before giving it to your program. To escape a character, precede it with a \.

Try running the command with ./a.out hello\;ls, and then using printf instead of echo.

share|improve this answer
    
Is possible to get the argument with ';', without using '\' in the command line argument. Is possible for me to include a '\' from my program after getting argv? –  Bithin Mar 18 '11 at 13:46
    
@Bithin If you are only using printf, then there is no need to escape whatever string you pass it. printf only prints, it will never execute any commands in the string you pass it. If you want to escape the string anyways, for other reasons, you can surround the string in single quotes, ', also called strong quotes, to prevent the shell from parsing it. char cmd[50] = "echo '"; strcat(cmd, argv[1]); strcat(cmd, "'"); system(cmd); –  Null Set Mar 18 '11 at 14:25
add comment

system() is very difficult to use in a secure manner. It's much easier to just use one of the exec* functions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.