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I want to write a CommandProcessor using generics. The idea being that a Command is issued via a single object (the CommandProcessor itself) that then identifies the Command Handlers that process the given command.

However, the following code doesn't compile, and I've not been able to understand why:

class GenericCommandProcessor : ICommandProcessor
{
    private readonly IDictionary<Type, IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>> _handlers = 
        new Dictionary<Type, IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>>();

    public void Register<TCommand>(ICommandHandler<TCommand> handler) 
        where TCommand : ICommand
    {
        IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>> handlers = GetHandlers<TCommand>();
        handlers.Add(handler); // <-- This doesn't compile
    }

    public void Process<TCommand>(TCommand command)
        where TCommand : ICommand
    {
        IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>> handlers = GetHandlers<TCommand>();

        foreach (var commandHandler in handlers)
        {
            commandHandler.Handle(command);
        }
    }

    private IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>> GetHandlers<TCommand>()
    {
        Type commandType = typeof(TCommand);

        IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>> handlers;
        if (!_handlers.TryGetValue(commandType, out handlers))
        {
            handlers = new List<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>();
            _handlers.Add(commandType, handlers);
        }
        return handlers;
    }
}

This is the line that doesn't compile:

handlers.Add(handler);

The compiler returns the following error:

cannot convert from 'GenericCommandHandlerTest.ICommandHandler<TCommand>' to 'GenericCommandHandlerTest.ICommandHandler<GenericCommandHandlerTest.ICommand>'

I would expect it to, because Register() has a generic constraint:

where TCommand : ICommand

I've avoided the issue by resolving the command handler list from IoC (Castle Windsor in my case) in favour of having the dictionary of lists of registered handlers, but I'd love to understand why, at the CLR level, this code doesn't compile. I think I just can't see the wood for the trees...

Many thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
What error do you get? –  SLaks Mar 18 '11 at 13:56
    
Why make the method generic at all? T can only ever be IListItem so why bother with a generic method? –  Bablo Mar 18 '11 at 13:57
    
Pasted the same into VS, replaced only IListItem on ICollection because I do not have IListItem, it compiles successfully. –  Snowbear Mar 18 '11 at 13:58
    
D'oh! Sorry about that - I wrote that code directly into SO.com, trying to come up with a simple example. I've now posted a more full example, and the exact compiler error. I've left out a few other classes for brevity, but I can provide them here if necessary. –  Neil Barnwell Mar 18 '11 at 19:17
1  
It's all Jeff's fault. Why doesn't SO compile the C# code? –  configurator Mar 18 '11 at 21:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just change your method to this:

public void AddListItem(IListItem listItem)
{
    _items.Add(listItem);
}

No need to use generics here.

As others already said: Even without the change, your code compiles, so please update your sample code.

Update after you fixed your example:
You can't add a variable of type ICommandHandler<TCommand> to a IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>, because ICommandHandler<ICommand> and ICommandHandler<TCommand> are two different types, although TCommand implements ICommand. If it would work, my first answer would be correct again and you wouldn't need to make your method generic in the first place.

I guess Covariance would be helpful here, but unfortunately it is not supported in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
I do need generics in my real example. This was a fatally over-simplified example, which I've completely replaced now. Sorry for wasting your time (I foolishly wrote the original example directly into SO.com, which hasn't yet had a C# compiler implemented :)) –  Neil Barnwell Mar 18 '11 at 19:19
    
@Neil: updated my answer –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 18 '11 at 19:42

Edit

What you're looking for is, like Daniel said, covariance.

If you are using C# 4, this actually exists, but not in a helpful form for you. For this example to work, ICommandHandler needs to be contravariant. If TCommand was only ever an out parameter in ICommandHandler and you would define ICommandHandler as

interface ICommandHandler<out TCommand> where TCommand: ICommand { ... }

then you would be able to store an ICommandHandler<TCommand> in a List<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>, because an ICommandHandler<TCommand> can be safely cast to a ICommandHandler<ICommand> - we know that if something returns a TCommand, it returns an ICommand.

However, in your case, TCommand is an in parameter, and to convert an ICommandHandler<TCommand> to a ICommandHandler<ICommand> you would need to know that every ICommand is an TCommand, which is obviously not true, which is why you can't do this conversion.

Neither of the two solutions I can think of right now are pretty.

  1. Make the dictionary untyped (a IDictionary<Type, IList>, or even a IDictionary<Type, object>) and cast to an IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>>, which would always work because you only add a command to it when the Type key matches.

  2. Make an ICommandHandlerWrapper that accepts an ICommandHandler<TCommand> as is in itself an ICommandHandler<ICommand>; when a method is called it does a type check and calls the underlying value.


Old version

Works on my machine

Possibly you're missing something important in your code example.

But I do want to ask, why use

public void AddListItem<T>(T listItem)
    where T : IListItem
{
    _items.Add(listItem);
}

and not

public void AddListItem(IListItem listItem)
{
    _items.Add(listItem);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe it is simplified example. Anyway it works on my machine also –  Snowbear Mar 18 '11 at 13:59
    
Yes - it was a fatally over-simplified example, which I've completely replaced now. Sorry for wasting your time (I foolishly wrote the original example directly into SO.com, which hasn't yet had a C# compiler implemented :)) –  Neil Barnwell Mar 18 '11 at 19:19
    
@Neil: I've added another answer for you. –  configurator Mar 18 '11 at 21:50
    
I don't agree with your explanation: "you would need to know that every TCommand is an ICommand, which is obviously not true". IMHO, it IS obviously true, that every TCommand is an ICommand, because of the constraint. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 19 '11 at 7:45
    
@Daniel: You're right. I meant to say "you would need to know that every ICommand is an TCommand". Fixed. –  configurator Mar 19 '11 at 21:18

Fundamentally, the problem is that you're trying to mix compile-time safety with a concept which you can't express: the fact that the dictionary maps typeof(T) to something related to T. In similar cases, I've found it useful to design the API around compile-time safety, but keep a small bit of code which requires casting. In this case, that just needs to be the GetHandlers() method (which isn't thread-safe, by the way - I hope that doesn't matter).

Here's the complete class:

class GenericCommandProcessor : ICommandProcessor
{
    private readonly IDictionary<Type, object> _handlers = 
        new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public void Register<TCommand>(ICommandHandler<TCommand> handler) 
        where TCommand : ICommand
    {
        IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>> handlers = GetHandlers<TCommand>();
        handlers.Add(handler);
    }

    public void Process<TCommand>(TCommand command)
        where TCommand : ICommand
    {
        IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>> handlers = GetHandlers<TCommand>();

        foreach (var commandHandler in handlers)
        {
            commandHandler.Handle(command);
        }
    }

    private IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>> GetHandlers<TCommand>()
    {
        Type commandType = typeof(TCommand);

        object untypedValue;
        if (!_handlers.TryGetValue(commandType, out untypedValue))
        {
            untypedValue = new List<ICommandHandler<TCommand>>();
            _handlers.Add(commandType, untypedValue);
        }
        return (IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>>) untypedValue;
    }
}

You could potentially change the TValue type argument of the dictionary to something more restrictive (e.g. IList) but it wouldn't really make much difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon - using object and casting was one of my possible solutions before I turned to Windsor, so it's good to see I wasn't being stupid. The really confusing thing for me really, is why that generic constraint on Register() wasn't enough to make it work... –  Neil Barnwell Apr 11 '11 at 8:11
    
@Neil: The problem was that the type of the variable handlers - an IList<ICommandHandler<TCommand>> isn't the same as an IList<ICommandHandler<ICommand>>, even when TCommand implements ICommand - because for the latter list, you can add any command-handler to the list, whereas for the former list it has to be a command handler for the specific TCommand. A bunch of bananas isn't a fruit-bowl - you can't add an apple to it :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 8:33

I did the following and was able to compile.

public interface IListItem
{
    int MyProperty { get; set; }
} 

public class ListProvider
{
    private IList<IListItem> _items = new List<IListItem>();

    public void AddListItem<T>(T listItem) where T : IListItem
    {
        _items.Add(listItem);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Works just fine for me, too

class Program
{
    private static readonly IList<IListItem> _items = new List<IListItem>();

    public static void AddListItem<T>(T listItem) where T : IListItem
    {
        _items.Add(listItem);

        foreach (var item in _items)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item.ToString());
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test tester = new Test();

        AddListItem(tester);
    }
}

internal interface IListItem
{
}

public class Test : IListItem
{
}
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