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I am trying to read input from file into an array. I seem to have done the needful, yet the code is not working as it should. Please tell me where am i going wrong. This s my code:

int pb[10][10];
int i,j,n;
string ip_filename = string("pro.txt");

    ifstream fil1;

    fil1.open(ip_filename.c_str());

// to store the probabilities of the nodes
for(i=0;i<num_rows;i++)
    for(j=0;j<num_cols;j++)
    fil1 >> pb[i][j];

fil1.close();

for(i=0;i<num_rows;i++)
{
for(j=0;j<num_cols;j++)
    cout<<pb[i][j]<<" ";
cout<<endl;
}

The text file is in the same directory as the cpp file is. While printing the output, it just prints 0 irrespective of the value in the file.

The values in the file is store as follows

0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15

num_rows and num_cols are defined previously in the code, both have the value 4.

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Are you sure your file load correctly? –  Kipotlov Mar 18 '11 at 14:36
    
The code is incomplete. num_rows and num_cols are not defined. –  etarion Mar 18 '11 at 14:37
    
error checking in the code and/or debugging will answer your question better than I can... –  stefaanv Mar 18 '11 at 14:38
    
@kipoltov: not able to get ur question. My file s in the same directory as the cpp file is. –  CHID Mar 18 '11 at 14:38
1  
@CHID : Are you sure 'fil1.open' work well? And btw, the current directory shouldn't be where your cpp file is, but where your exe file is. –  Kipotlov Mar 18 '11 at 14:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code works perfectly fine for me with pro.txt formatted like you show:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int num_rows = 4;
    int num_cols = 4;
    int pb[10][10];
    int i,j,n;
    string ip_filename = string("pro.txt");

    ifstream fil1;

    fil1.open(ip_filename.c_str());

    // to store the probabilities of the nodes
    for(i=0;i<num_rows;i++)
        for(j=0;j<num_cols;j++)
            fil1 >> pb[i][j];

    fil1.close();

    for(i=0;i<num_rows;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<num_cols;j++)
            cout<<pb[i][j]<<" ";
        cout<<endl;
    }

}

My suggestion would be to ensure that pro.txt is in the same directory as you .exe file. If you are using an IDE to build this code it is likely a different directory from your .cpp files.

share|improve this answer
    
wow. gr8 suggestion DAVE. but now i am getting junk values instead of int values.. is ther any prob in the code? –  CHID Mar 18 '11 at 16:03
    
@CHID I built and ran exactly what is posted and it worked fine. Try to see what differences there may be between this code and your code. The only thing I did was wrap the code you posted in a main() function and define num_rows and num_cols. –  Dave Rager Mar 18 '11 at 16:27

When using fstream, for robust coding, it is best to check error conditions with is_open() after open() and fail() after operator<<().
Furthermore, prefer

while(getline(fil1, lineString))
{
  ...;
}

so you can check what line you're reading in and what is going wrong.

Happy checking...

share|improve this answer
    
thank u stefaanv. Made it more clear :) –  CHID Mar 18 '11 at 15:00

As i see you want to load a matrix from a file. In file your values are stored as string separated by space. So you should load your file, read the file line by line, separate your string into a string array and the convert your values from string to int and store them into your matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
oh is it.. i was trying to do directly. may be thts y i dint get.. Thank u Andrel –  CHID Mar 18 '11 at 14:57
    
ifstream does that conversion for you. It will read to the space and try to convert what was read to the type of the variable in which it is to be stored. –  Dave Rager Mar 18 '11 at 14:58
    
@dave: if tht s so, my file adheres to the format of ifstream. yet ther s no output.. what does ifstream do when it encounters \n character –  CHID Mar 18 '11 at 15:04
1  
@CHID ifstream will skip all white space including \n characters. The code would work just as well if all 16 numbers were on one line. See my answer, I tried your code as-is and it works fine for me. –  Dave Rager Mar 18 '11 at 15:43

Usually the simplest way to do these kinds of things is to store the data in a flat array (or even better a std::vector), and the use simple arithmetics to access the elements by rows and columns. This makes things much simpler.

A wrapper for this could look like this:

template<int ColumnCount>
class MyMatrix {
public:
    template<class T>
    MyMatrix(T & begin, T & end) : data(begin, end) {}

    int getItem(int i, int j) const {
        return data[i*ColumnCount+j];
    }
private:
    std::vector<int> data;
};

Then you can read the data like this:

std::ifstream file1("pro.txt");
std::istream_iterator<int> begin(file1);
std::istream_iterator<int> end;

MyMatrix<4> m(begin, end);
share|improve this answer

What is the status of the stream after each operation? You shouldn't be reading without verifying. And you shouldn't be reading without having verified that the open worked:

ifstream fill( ip_filename.c_str() );
if ( !fill ) {
    //  error handling, open failed...
}

After that, I would agree with the suggestion of reading line by line:

int row = 0;
string line;
while ( getline( fill, line ) && row < size( pb ) ) {
    istringstream sLine( line );
    int col = 0;
    int tmp ;
    while ( sLine >> tmp && col < size( pb[ row ] )) {
        pb[row][col] = tmp;
        ++ col;
    }
    if ( col != size( pb[ row ] ) ) {
        //  Input error, too few entries
    } else if ( sLine >> ws && sLine.get() != EOF ) {
        //  Input error, garbage at end of line <row>
    }
    ++ row;
}
if ( row != size( pb ) ) {
    //  Input error, garbage at end of file
}

Alternatively, you could decide on the dimensions dynamically, according to the input:

std::vector<std::vector<int> > pb;
ifstream fill( ip_filename.c_str() );
if ( !fill ) {
    //  error handling, open failed...
}
string line;
while ( getline( fill, line ) ) {
    std::vector<int> tmp1;
    istringstream sLine( line );
    int tmp2;
    while ( sLine >> tmp2 ) {
        tmp1.back().push_back( tmp2 );
    }
    if ( sLine >> ws && ! sLine.eof() ) {
        //  input error: non-numeric data in line
    } else if ( ! pb.empty() && tmp1.size() != pb.back().size() ) {
        //  input error : inconsistent number of columns.
    }
}
//  Check here if square matrix required.
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