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Cost and Speed aside. Why was main memory put in the computer?

My assumption in the question above is that disk is as fast as RAM or faster than RAM. Therefore, if something doesn't fit in cache it can go in disk. The question really is if speed is high and cost of access is low from a certain disk can RAM be eliminated? or is RAM still significant and necessary under these conditions. If so please let me know why?

This is a hypothetical situation.

Edited for clarity.

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closed as not a real question by Jeff Atwood Mar 18 '11 at 20:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you talking about some day in the future when disks are actually faster than RAM? Because right now RAM is by far the fastest. No seek time and very fast transfer rates. In fact, when HDDs are measured for speed its the speed that they can write and read to and from RAM. – Chris Haas Mar 18 '11 at 15:22
    
Actually this was asked to me in an interview. My answer was we need RAM to make access quicker and that even if disks were faster than RAM or as fast as RAM they have to physically placed close enough to the processor to achieve better speedup as that of RAM as data transfer is limited by speed of light. If this is not done physically and there is an intermediate storage introduced again, we have something like RAM. So, we need RAM if not at least we need the CPU caches. – tintin Mar 18 '11 at 17:56

Because disk access is orders of magnitude slower than RAM access.

But if, as you say, disk access would be faster than RAM, there would be almost no reason to have RAM.

Or, to really answer the question: no reason at all.

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Historically there was no guarantee that a computer would have a hard disk - you would load everything from floppy (or tape drive, or whatever media was around at the time). That means that there's no possibility of swap space, if your program doesn't fit on the CPU cache it needs somewhere to go, and RAM fills that need. Even now, things like live-boot operating systems wouldn't work without RAM since then require more space than is available in the on-chip cache.

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Can you explain why things like live-boot OS wouldn't work without RAM. My assumption in the question above is that disk is as fast as RAM or faster than RAM. Therefore, if something doesn't fit in cache it can go in disk. The question really is if speed is high and cost of access is low from a certain disk can RAM be eliminated? or is RAM still significant and necessary under these conditions. – tintin Mar 18 '11 at 15:07
    
@tintin - A live-boot OS should not write to disk under normal operation. It may not even be able to read the disk (I've used Ubuntu live-boot to diagnose disk problems, for example). It may not be able to write to the file system on the disk (5 years ago Linux writing to NTFS was dangerous at best). It may pick a disk to use for memory swap to that is hot-swappable, and what happens if that disk is removed? – tloach Mar 18 '11 at 15:16
    
@tioach,thank you. – tintin Mar 19 '11 at 1:14

If this about the hypothetical future I would assume that whatever technology that they use to make hard drives faster they'd just apply to RAM so that RAM is still at least as fast as hard drives. We've got several decades worth of code that assumes that there's both RAM and another larger storage medium. If there's no storage medium then the program usually then creates a virtual storage medium within the RAM and pretends that its a hard drive or something similar. We're chained to this paradigm unless we want to break backwards compatibility.

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