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I've been asked to maintain some not-as-legacy-as-I-would-like code, and it is riddled with compiler directives, making it pretty much unreadable and almost as maintainable. Case in point:

#if CONDITION_1
        protected override void BeforeAdd(LogEntity entity)
#else
        protected override void BeforeAdd(AbstractBusinessEntity entity)
#endif
        {
#if CONDITON_1
            entity.DateTimeInsert = DateTime.Now;
#else
            ((LogEntity) entity).DateTimeInsert = DateTime.Now;
#endif
            base.BeforeAdd(entity);
        }

using directives are even prettier:

#if CONDITION_1
using CompanyName.Configuration;
#endif

#if CONDITION_2||CONDITION_1
using CompanyName.Data;
using CompanyName.Data.SqlBuilders;
#else
using CompanyName.Legacy.Database;
using CompanyName.Legacy.Database.SQLBuilders;
using CompanyName.Legacy.Database.SQLBuilders.parameterTypes;
#endif

I thought I'd give the ConditionalAttribute a go but that won't quite work in this situation

Is there any way I can work my way out of this compiler directive nightmare?

The code is compiled against .NET 3.5.

UPDATE:
Oded answered suggesting removing the compiler directives around the BeforeAdd method thus overloading it. Unfortunately that won't work since both methods are supposed to be overriding an AbstractBusiness class which provides two different implementations depending on which assemblies end up being included:

protected virtual void BeforeAdd(TEntity entity) {}

or

protected virtual void BeforeAdd(AbstractBusinessEntity entity) {}

This code gets its dependencies from a set of libraries de company created some time in the past and have been "upgrading" ever since. They now have 4 different versions of that set of libraries with colliding namespaces and differing implementations. All in the name of "backwards compatibility" with applications that use the (very) old versions.


CONCLUSION

I ended up choosing @Oded's answer because it makes the most sense as a general approach (K.I.S.S. and all that). I could not use it in this case though; what you see here is just the tip of the iceberg. I wouldn't want to K.I.S.S. this code if it paid me.

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5  
I bet whoever wrote that thought they were being exceedingly clever... –  adamjford Mar 18 '11 at 15:02
2  
If it were alive, I'd tell you to take it out back and shoot it before the disease kills anything else it touches. –  senfo Mar 18 '11 at 15:26
2  
I do not envy you –  MattDavey Mar 18 '11 at 15:26
    
Why do you have the two different methods? in what scenarios are they used? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 18 '11 at 15:43
2  
You sure you couldn't use branching in a DVCS or similar to handle this? ie. create one branch for common, one for type 1 and one for type 2, add code to common and merge into both branches when it is common, and develop in one or the other when it is not? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 18 '11 at 16:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the first case, it looks like you could simply have several overloads of the method instead of this construct. Overload resolution should take care of things at this point.

In the second case (using directives) - you can alias some of the directives and include all of them, using the alias where needed. What happens when all namespaces are included? Any name collisions?

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@Oded - Thanks for the tips. Unfortunately, yes, plenty of namespace and class name collisions. –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 18 '11 at 15:14
    
@Sergi - So, identical class names defined in different namespaces? –  Oded Mar 18 '11 at 15:18
    
Even worse: see that both methods are overrides? That makes it impossible to use overloads, since the method takin a LogEntity doesn't have a valid override if CONDITON_1 isn't met –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 18 '11 at 15:21
    
@Oded - In several cases yes. –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 18 '11 at 15:21
    
@Sergi - All I can suggest is to start cleaning up what you can. You should be able to slowly remove pre-processor directives and things should get easier as you go along. Rename functions where needed, create wrapper overloads... anything really. –  Oded Mar 18 '11 at 15:23

I'd claim that the problem isn't in this class. This class is just a symptom. The problem is in the base class that's calling BeforeAdd. If you can refactor there, then you won't need the conditional compiles.

If you have conflicting names and namespaces, you can work around that with the using keyword (not the one for assemblies).

So you can do something like

using LegacyLogEntity = Some.Fully.Qualified.Namespace.LogEntity;
using SomeOtherLogEntity = Some.Other.Fully.Qualified.Namespace.CurrentLogEntity;

// ..
LegacyLogEntity entity = new LegacyLogEntity();

I also think that the problem is in the base class, not in this class, per se.

In that event you can get around this nonsense by using either adaptation or interfacing.

I don't know what the other class is called, but let's say that it's called an EntityAggregator.

public interface IEntity {
    DateTime InsertionTime { get; set; }
}

then in your aggregator base class:

protected virtual void BeforeAdd(IEntity entity)
{ // whatever
}

then in your subclass:

protected override void BeforeAdd(IEntity entity)
{
    entity.DateTime = DateTime.Now;
    base.BeforeAdd(entity);
}

Now you can adapt the other objects to be IEntity by implementing that interface.

When I look at this code, it also strikes me that maybe you be using events instead of this code.

Now if you're talking about multiple use compilation, where the code is being compiled in two separate places under two different conditions, then you can do that more gracefully by using partial classes.

You isolate the CONDITION_1 code into something like this:

// in file WhateverYourClassIs.condition1.cs
#if !CONDITION_1
#error this file should never be included in a build WITHOUT CONDITION_1 set
#endif

public partial class WhateverYourClassIs {
    protected override void BeforeAdd(LogEntity entity) {
        entity.DateTimeInsert = DateTime.Now;
        base.BeforeAdd(entity);
    }
}

// in file WhateverYourClassIs.NotCondition1.cs

#if CONDITION_1
#error this file should never be included in a build WITH CONDITION_1 set
#endif

public partial class WhateverYourClassIs {
    protected override void BeforeAdd(AbstractBusinessEntity entity) {
        ((LogEntity)entity).DateTimeInsert = DateTime.Now;
        base.BeforeAdd(entity);
    }
}

I don't like this in this case because of code repetition. You can help this with use of the using keyword:

#if CONDITION_1
using MyAbstractBusinessEntity = LogEntity;
#else
using MyAbstractBusinessEntity = AbstractBusinessEntity;
#endif

// ...

protected override void BeforeAdd(MyAbstractBusinessEntity entity)
{
    // in CONDITION_1, the case is a no-op
    ((LogEntity)entity).DateTimeInsert = DateTime.Now;
    base.BeforeAdd(entity);
}
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It's hard to tell with the information I have in front of me, but I have to guess, this is still over complicating the situation. While I like the idea of the interface (I suggested a similar approach, below), this looks like the perfect situation for a factory. I'd be looking into StructureMap (or some other IoC container) long before writing a single compiler directive again. –  senfo Mar 18 '11 at 16:40

Based on what I'm seeing, it seems the original developer didn't have any sense of inheritance and polymorphism. It's a little difficult to tell from the code, but it seems LogEntity and AbstractBusinessEntity share common properties. Is there an inheritance model or are they two completely unrelated classes? If they are unrelated, could you create an inheritance model or an interface they can both implement? It might help if you pasted the classes.

Long story short, I wouldn't waste my time trying to work with that code in its current form. I'd find a way to eliminate the compiler directives, at all costs. It doesn't look to be completely un-salvageable, but it might take some effort.

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I don't know if it is practical, but what I would do would be to create branches in my DVCS, Mercurial, to handle this.

I would have 2 branches in play, and a 3rd temporarily while I fix bugs/add code that is common.

Here's how I would create the initial versions:

              5---6---7         <-- type 1 of library
             /
1---2---3---4
             \
              8---9--10         <-- type 2 of library

To fix bugs in only one of them:

              5---6---7--11     <-- bugfix or change only to type 1
             /
1---2---3---4
             \
              8---9--10

To fix bugs that are common:

              5---6---7--11--13--15    <-- merged into type 1
             /                   /
1---2---3---4--11--12---+-------+      <-- common fix(es)
             \           \
              8---9--10--14            <-- merged into type 2

Note: This assumes you're not going to make heavy-handed refactoring in either type or common branches, if you do that, you're probably better off with your current situation, at least compared to a branchy way like this. Any such refactoring would make future merges really painful.

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3 words: Team Foundation Server. ;) –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 18 '11 at 16:06
    
To be honest I'm not particularly fond of TFS. It regularly gets confused about its own merges. Ie. ask it what changes in branch X is not in branch Y, and it lists a lot. Then you merge a few of those into branch Y. Then you ask it the other way around, and it'll happily list the merge-changeset you just committed as not present in X. I'll take Mercurial any day of the week as long as I have a choice :) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 18 '11 at 16:10
    
Boy do I agree. I'm just saying that it's not an option in this case. The company uses TFS and that's the end of it... –  Sergi Papaseit Mar 18 '11 at 16:11
    
Aha, I thought you meant you recommended that :) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 18 '11 at 16:20
1  
Hi downvoter, note that I don't mind you downvoting my questions and/or answers. I fully understand, and appreciate, that people have different opinions, and views, but it would be most welcome if you could post a short comment as to why you downvoted me. Did I type out something inaccurate? Something that is just plain wrong? Do you just disagree? Whatever it is, I'd welcome it even if you just spun up a sockpuppet account to leave an anonymous comment. I want to improve my posts and my professional career, and I always want to learn new stuff, so give me a chance, please? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 18 '11 at 18:59

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