Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a huge method of validate that I want to refactor. Here is an example. I have provided the initial validation, and my own suggestion. Do you think it's a good way to refactor it or there are better ways to refactor this?

Thanks,

public void validate() {

   MyException myException= new MyException();
   try {
      if (!isRule1()) {
         throw MyException.invalidRule(Rule1);
      }
   }
   catch (MyException e) {
      myException.addWrappedException(e);
   }

   try{
       f (!isRule2()) {
             throw MyException.invalidRule(Rule2);
          }
       }
       catch (MyException e) {
          myException.addWrappedException(e);
   }

   ////continue checking...
}

and here is how I want to refactor them:

public void validate() {


   MyException myException= new MyException();
   validateRule1(myException);
   validateRule2(myException);
   //continue validating....
}
private void validateRule1(myException){
   try {
      if (!isRule1()) {
         throw MyException.invalidRule(Rule1);
      }
   }
   catch (MyException e) {
      myException.addWrappedException(e);
   }
}
private void validateRule2(myException){
   try {
      if (!isRule2()) {
         throw MyException.invalidRule(Rule2);
      }
   }
   catch (MyException e) {
      myException.addWrappedException(e);
   }
}
share|improve this question
1  
This question is probably okay here, although it's borderline subjective & argumentative, but you might be interested in codereview.stackexchange.com for future questions like it. –  Pops Mar 18 '11 at 15:22
    
sure. I was not aware of such a place. –  paradisonoir Mar 18 '11 at 20:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about trying

MyException myException= new MyException();
if (!isRule1())
    myException.addWrappedException(MyException.invalidRule(Rule1));

or

MyException myException= new MyException();
myException.addWrappedException(checkRule1());

where checkRule1() returns an exception or null and addWrappedException ignores nulls.

or

MyException myException= new MyException();
checkRule1(myException);
share|improve this answer

You could use the Decorator pattern here. Create an interface that has a single method validate() and then create different classes implementing this interface containing the validation code. Then you can call validate on the object you build and this will unwind through all the other validations.

This has the added benefit of improving the modularity of the code, enabling you to unit test the validations independently. You can also easily add or remove validations from the chain as needed.

A simple example is coded below.

public interface Validator {
  void validate(Object input) throws ValidationException
}

public class ValidationOne implements Validator {
  protected Validator validator;

  public ValidationOne(Validator validator) {
    this.validator = validator;
  }

  public void validate(Object input) throws ValidationException {
    if (validator != null) 
      validator.validate(input);
    // do specific ValidationOne checks
    if (!isValid(input)) throw new ValidationException()
  }
}

public class ValidationTwo implements Validator {
  protected Validator validator;

  public ValidationTwo(Validator validator) {
    this.validator = validator;
  }

  public void validate(Object input) throws ValidationException {
    if (validator != null)
      validator.validate(input);
    // do specific ValidationTwo checks
    if (!isValid(input)) throw new ValidationException()
  }
}


public class Tester {

   public void runValidations(Object obj) {
      Validator validator = new ValidationOne(null);
      validator = new ValidationTwo(validator);
      // continue adding validations as needed
      try {
        validator.validate(obj);
      } catch (ValidationException e) {
        System.err.println("Validation error occurred");
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just make the Validator (i.e. public interface Validator<T> and use T instead of Object) generic type and it will be perfect. and it will be perfect. –  Przemek Kryger Mar 18 '11 at 17:07
    
That is a very nice approach. It worries me though because my validation is going to be on some API level which might cause some regression. I might start doing it with some less-risky refactoring. Thanks for the suggestion –  paradisonoir Mar 18 '11 at 18:10

Definitely start with Replace Method with Method Object. It's not risky and you shouldn't be afraid of it with such a huge method. Then your approach seems to be good... just be sure to rename things like validateRule1 ;)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.