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SELECT p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep,
    (
        SELECT COUNT(f.FlagTime)
            FROM Flags as f 
                JOIN Posts as p 
                ON p.PostPID = f.FlagPID
    ) as PostFlags
    FROM Posts AS p
        JOIN Users AS u
        ON p.PostUID = u.UserUID
    ORDER BY PostTime DESC
    LIMIT 0, 30

I have this query and I don't know why but this piece of code seems not to be working, it returns the query like if it is like this:

SELECT p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep,
    (
        SELECT COUNT(f.FlagTime)
            FROM Flags as f 
    ) as PostFlags
    FROM Posts AS p
        JOIN Users AS u
        ON p.PostUID = u.UserUID
    ORDER BY PostTime DESC
    LIMIT 0, 30

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Can you provide sample data, current output and desired output? –  Abe Miessler Mar 18 '11 at 16:20
    
Charlie, this is a bit hilarious - you have a query that you don't understand, as it behaves differently that what you would expect. To explain what you would expect from it, you give us another query, hoping what? That among the readers of your question there will be people who will understand exactly how you misunderstand your own first query and understand exactly how you interpret your second query. Not voting you down due to entertainment value. –  Unreason Mar 18 '11 at 16:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep,
    (
        SELECT COUNT(f.FlagTime)
            FROM Flags as f 
                JOIN Posts as p1
                ON p1.PostPID = f.FlagPID
                where p1.PostPID = p.PostPID
    ) as PostFlags
FROM Posts AS p
    JOIN Users AS u
    ON p.PostUID = u.UserUID
ORDER BY PostTime DESC
LIMIT 0, 30

Edit:

I think it would be better like this:

SELECT p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep,
    count(f.FlagTime) as PostFlags

FROM Posts AS p
JOIN Users AS u ON p.PostUID = u.UserUID
left join Flags f on p.PostPID = f.FlagPID

group by p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep

ORDER BY PostTime DESC
LIMIT 0, 30
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. –  Jefffrey Mar 18 '11 at 16:46
    
Clodoaldo's two versions should yield the same results (Assuming PostPID is unique) but I would not recommend the second version; There is often a limit to how many fields one can group by. The correlated sub query version is usually considered better practice. –  MatBailie Mar 18 '11 at 16:54
    
The join in the correlated sub query is redundant, and if PostPID isn't unique in [Posts] then the results will duplicate. I'd just remove the join and put WHERE f.FlagPID = p.PostPID (referencing the main query's instance of the [Posts] table. –  MatBailie Mar 18 '11 at 16:56
    
@Dems Yes you are right about the redundancy. Given the lack of information on the contrary I assume a column named as somethingID should be unique. Could you cite the source of that fields limit in group by? –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 18 '11 at 18:34

Without example data, example output, and a description of the desired out, it's hard to be sure what you need.

What I do notice, however, is that your sub query (PostFlags) contains the table Posts, as does your main query. And they even share the same alias.


From this I'd infer that you want to get one of two things...

  1. The count of all flags for all posts
    This would give the same value for every record in your results

  2. The count of all flags for the current post
    This would give a different value for each record in your results


If you want version one, I would change the aliases of the sub query. Instead of using "P", use "Px" or something instead. I don't imagine this would necessarily change anything, but using the same alias as the main query could confuse the human reader, never mind the RDBMS.


If you want version two, you don't need to include the join in the sub query. Instead you can do the following...

SELECT
  p.PostPID, p.PostUID, p.PostText, p.PostTime, u.UserUID, u.UserName, u.UserImage, u.UserRep,
  (
      SELECT COUNT(FlagTime)
      FROM Flags
      WHERE FlagPID = p.PostPID
  ) as PostFlags
FROM
  Posts AS p
JOIN
  Users AS u
    ON p.PostUID = u.UserUID
ORDER BY
  PostTime DESC
LIMIT 0, 30

The where clause is now referencing the Posts table from the main query. This becomes a Correlated-Sub-Query - The result varies dependant upon the value of a field in another table.


If none of these are what you need, please give examples;
- Example data
- Example results
- Expected results
- Description of why these are expected

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