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In thinking about C++ iterator question, I wrote this sample program:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm> 

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
{ 
    os<<"(";
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<T>(os, ", "));
    return os<<")";
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v(3);
    std::vector<std::vector<int> > vv(3, v);
    std::cout << v << "\n"; // this line works
    std::cout << vv << "\n"; // this line produces error
}

I compile this program with gcc and get the typical 100 lines of errors. The relevant part, I believe, is:

it.cc:19: instantiated from here

/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/stream_iterator.h:191: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘*((std::ostream_iterator >, char, std::char_traits >*)this)->std::ostream_iterator >, char, std::char_traits >::_M_stream << __value’

Why does this fail? In my templated operator<<, I try to specify that any vector, regardless of type, is printable. So why doesn't std::vector<std::vector<>> print?

EDIT: Using the following code in the template function makes it work

#if 0
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<T>(os, ", "));
#else
    for(typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator it = v.begin();
        it != v.end();
        it++) {
        os<<(*it)<<", ";
    }
#endif
share|improve this question
    
Doesn't work in Intel C++ either. – larsmans Mar 18 '11 at 16:44
    
Does it work if you replace std::copy with a manual loop? – fredoverflow Mar 18 '11 at 16:48
2  
I don't know the exact reason this happens(I think it has something to do with ADL). But I've found that if I put the function into the std namespace, it fixes the problem. Though I'm not sure if that's a good idea or not. – Benjamin Lindley Mar 18 '11 at 16:48
    
Thanks @larsmans. It fails in clang++, also. I assume that the problem is in my program, not the compiler. – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 16:48
2  
Thanks, @Benjamin. Putting anything in std:: seems like a bad idea. – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 16:49
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Two words: name lookup.

Here is a simplified example of what you are trying to do, without any Standard Library headers required:

template <typename T> void f(T) { }

namespace ns {
    class C { };

    void f(int) { }

    void test() { f(C()); } // doesn't work :'(
}

int main() {
    f(ns::C());             // works!  :-D
}

In this example, in main(), the only f that is found during normal name lookup is the function template in the global namespace, and it matches, so main uses it (ns::f is also found during argument-dependent lookup, but it isn't a match so the global f is still selected during overload resolution).

In test, however, the ns::f(int) overload is found and name lookup stops. Namespaces are searched outwards, so ns is searched first, then the global namespace, but name lookup stops once a name is found, so once ns::f(int) is found, name lookup stops. Argument-dependent lookup also takes place and also finds ns::f(int), since C is in namespace ns, then ADL stops searching.

The same is true in your example: in main(), the operator<< overload is found, but inside of the std::ostream_iterator, which is in the std namespace, other << overloads are found, and so your overload is not found.

Your operator<< overload would need to be in the std namespace for it to work, but unfortunately you aren't allowed to add names to the std namespace.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the clear explanation. Reducing a template problem by eliminating STL is a good technique for explaining this. – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 17:09
    
@Rob: you might want to read about Argument Dependent Lookup. For your information... I simply added those overloads within the std namespace. It's forbidden, daemons might fly out of my nose... but it works for me (and I'll have to check it out when a new compiler is released). – Matthieu M. Mar 18 '11 at 17:19
    
Thanks, @Matthieu. I was just reading en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument-dependent_name_lookup as you were typing that comment! – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 17:21
1  
@Johannes: I certainly don't :) – Matthieu M. Mar 18 '11 at 18:22
1  
@Johannes: No, I don't mind at all. Please continue :-). I contribute here so that I can hopefully understand C++ better and so that I can learn to explain the language concisely and correctly. Your comments and answers are absolutely invaluable and are greatly appreciated (especially for questions like this; I am still very noobish when it comes to name resolution, ADL, and overload resolution). – James McNellis Mar 18 '11 at 18:28

Lookup in the instantiation context of a function template only uses ADL. No unqualified lookup. Therefor, you need to rely on ADL. But the ADL lookup for vector<int> does not include the global namespace, hence your operator<< is not found. Try this, which should work fine:

struct A { 
  operator int() const { return 0; }
};

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
{ 
    os<<"(";
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<T>(os, ", "));
    return os<<")";
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> v(3);
    std::vector< std::vector<A> > vv(3, v);
    std::cout << vv << "\n"; // should work fine
}

This works because the global namespace is associated with the ADL lookup set for std::vector<A> (because A is a template argument), therefor finding the globally declared template when instantiating the respective member functions of std::ostream_iterator<>, which will use your operator<< for T being A, which then in turn will use operator<<(int) of std::ostream.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. To restate your answer slightly, using my original operator<< template, I can cout<<vector<vector<MyClass> >(), even though I cannot cout<<vector<vector<POD> >(), for the ADL reasons you stated. (Assuming that I can cout<<MyClass(), of course). Thanks! – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 17:44

I think since std::copy is defined in different namespace, and the generated code from the function template std::copy and ostream_iterator class template, is unable to find the operator<< defined by you which exists in different namespace.

To solve this problem you've to define operator<< in std namespace as shown below:

namespace std //note the namespace
{
   template <class T>
   std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
   { 
     os<<"(";
      std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<T>(os, ", "));
      return os<<")"; 
   }
}

Working code at ideone : http://ideone.com/sFenn

However, I cannot say how good the idea of implementing it is in std namespace!


Alternatively, you can define operator<< as (without using std::copy):

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&os, const std::vector<T>& v) 
{ 
   typedef typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator const_iterator;
   os<<"(";
   for (const_iterator it = v.begin() ; it != v.end() ; ++it )
       os << *it << ", ";
   return os<<")"; 
}

Working code : http://ideone.com/FXWlP

share|improve this answer
2  
Overloads cannot be added to the std namespace. – James McNellis Mar 18 '11 at 17:06
    
Thanks! Great minds think alike. See @FredOverflow's comment on my question, and my subsequent edit. – Robᵩ Mar 18 '11 at 17:07
    
@James: I was about to have that doubt. Anyway, I added one more line to my answer. BTW, what do you think overloads cannot be added to the std namespace? – Nawaz Mar 18 '11 at 17:09
2  
Undefined Behavior. 17.4.3.1 "It is undefined for a C++ program to add declarations or definitions to namespace std or namespaces within namespace std unless otherwise specified." – aschepler Mar 18 '11 at 17:10
1  
Because the authors of Standard Library implementations need to be able to know that when they make a qualified call to a function, it calls the function they expect to be called, not some user-added overload. – James McNellis Mar 18 '11 at 17:11

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