Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What is the best way to make a generic equivalence function for two Dictionaries, whose keys and values are value types?

Right now I have a Dictionary<string, bool>, and have created an extension method that (I think) works to test for equivalence between two Dictionary<string, bool>.

I wanted to make it more generic. And my first thought was to make it like this:

public static bool EquivalentTo<K, V>(this IDictionary<K, V> lhs, 
                                           IDictionary<K, V> rhs) 
        where K: struct 
        where V: struct
    { }

However, this doesn't work because strings are immutable reference types, and NOT a value type.

So how would one go about generic-izing my original Equivalence test for Dictionary<string, bool> ?

share|improve this question
    
Why is it important to have the two where clauses limiting K and V types on the function? –  scwagner Feb 11 '09 at 6:01
    
because I don't want to have to Clone a reference type –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 6:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do you want to restrict K and V to being value types in the first place? I suggest you just remove the constraints. There are "interesting" things about dictionaries though - are two dictionaries which happen to have the same entries, but use different equality comparers equivalent? IDictionary<,> doesn't have an equality comparer property, unfortunately, so you may need to provide on to your equivalence method. You'll need to consider what it even means to be equivalent here.

For example, two dictionaries both with case-insensitive equality comparers might have { "FOO", true } and { "foo", true } - to some extent they're equivalent, but to some extent they aren't. It depends on what you want to use the equivalence relation for.

EDIT: Here's an example which should be fine in most cases, but could give odd results if the two dictionaries treat keys differently:

public static bool EquivalentTo<TKey, TValue>(
     this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> first,
     IDictionary<TKey, TValue> second)
{
     return first.EquivalentTo(second, EqualityComparer<TValue>.Default);
}

public static bool EquivalentTo<TKey, TValue>(
     this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> first,
     IDictionary<TKey, TValue> second,
     IEqualityComparer<TValue> valueComparer)
{
    if (first == second)
    {
        return true;
    }
    if (first == null || second == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if (first.Count != second.Count)
    {
        return false;
    }
    foreach (var firstKeyValue in first)
    {
        TValue secondValue;
        if (!second.TryGetValue(firstKeyValue.Key, out secondValue) ||
            !valueComparer.Equals(firstKeyValue.Value, secondValue))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Untested, but let me know if it does what you want...

share|improve this answer
    
Really at this point all I need is the non-generic version, but I like experimenting and learning as I go. Your post gives me food for thought, so I have succeeded :) –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 6:34
    
My reasoning for having K and V be value types was that I could make a straightforward test for equivalence, if they are reference types then the test for equivalence becomes much less straightforward. –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 6:37
    
Use an Iequalitycomparer to do the comparisons - more info when I'm not walking and typing on a phone. –  Jon Skeet Feb 11 '09 at 6:40
    
very nice. I was doing something similar but catching a KeyNotFoundException. The TryGetValue is much better. Thanks. –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 8:18
    
In C# is the Or lazy? So if the first half fails, it doesn't execute the right? –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 8:26

I can't think of a way to do exactly what you're looking for in a single construct. You could have overloads that explicitly use string instead of a template parameter for the type, so you'd end up with 3 overloads:

public static bool EquivalentTo<string, V>(this IDictionary<string, V> lhs, 
                                                IDictionary<string, V> rhs) 
    where V: struct
{ }
public static bool EquivalentTo<K, string>(this IDictionary<K, string> lhs, 
                                                IDictionary<K, string> rhs) 
    where K: struct
{ }
public static bool EquivalentTo<K, V>(this IDictionary<K, V> lhs, 
                                           IDictionary<K, V> rhs) 
    where K: struct 
    where V: struct
{ }

I'm pretty sure that's not what you're looking for, but I don't have any better ideas off the top of my head.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I could always make it type Dictionary<string, V> –  Alex Baranosky Feb 11 '09 at 6:18
    
Right, if your key is always a string. –  scwagner Feb 11 '09 at 6:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.