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In C the following code works consider I always use gcc.

int foo( int foo_var )
{
 /*code*/
  int bar( int bar_var )  
  {
    /*code*/
    return bar_var;
  }
  return bar(foo_var);
}

How can achieve the same functionality of nested functions in C++ on gcc compiler? Don't mind if this seems like a beginner question. I am new to this site.

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1  
If you need this feature in C, you're propably misusing the language anyway. And even if not, a solution that at least work on the major compilers, if not somethinge entirely standard, would be vastly preferrable to what's basically a very rare compiler-specific extension. –  delnan Mar 18 '11 at 18:08
3  
+1 Wow, I didn't know this was possible! Thanks for making me learn something new ^^! –  helpermethod Mar 18 '11 at 18:08
    
and... the conversion to CW is broken (6 identical edits triggered it). Is this already a known issue on meta that I can upvote? –  Ben Voigt Mar 18 '11 at 18:10
1  
@Ben: the conversion seems to have been triggered by 5 different editors all editing (even though their changes were largely identical, this counts). However, there's another oddity in the revision history that doesn't make so much sense. See: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/83772/… –  Shog9 Mar 18 '11 at 19:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Turn your function into a functor as Herb Sutter suggests in this article

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4  
Why a downvote? –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 18 '11 at 18:14
17  
It's a good link, but you could really have improved this answer by demonstrating it as Ben did in his answer. Link-only answers are... kinda icky. No matter how good the link is, the answer becomes utterly worthless if it ever breaks. –  Shog9 Mar 18 '11 at 18:27
2  
@Shog9: Did I say you did? (No; in fact I took great care not to imply that, an apparently wasted effort.) –  GManNickG Mar 18 '11 at 18:35
2  
I didn't downvote it, but this answer is demonstrably false. (My first code snippet is the demonstration, it is not a functor, and it is wholly contained inside the outer function) s/need to/should/ and the answer becomes true, which is why I'm neither up- nor down-voting it. –  Ben Voigt Mar 18 '11 at 18:49
2  
@Prasoon: +1 for completely correct answer. @GMan, @Shog9: I have no clue who downvoted this, but I suspect the downvotes on two of the other answers came from the same silent <strike>killer</strike> downvoter. –  Ben Voigt Mar 18 '11 at 19:01

Local functions are not allowed in C++, but local classes are and function are allowed in local classes. So:

int foo( int foo_var )
{
 /*code*/
  struct local 
  {
    static int bar( int bar_var )  
    {
      /*code*/
      return bar_var;
    }
  };
  return local::bar(foo_var);
}

In C++0x, you would also have the option of creating a functor using lambda syntax. That's a little more complicated in C++03, but still not bad if you don't need to capture variables:

int foo( int foo_var )
{
 /*code*/
  struct bar_functor
  {
    int operator()( int bar_var )  
    {
      /*code*/
      return bar_var;
    }
  } bar;
  return bar(foo_var);
}
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+1. I sometime use local struct as an alternative to nested function! –  Nawaz Mar 18 '11 at 18:07
2  
Missing static on the member function? –  aschepler Mar 18 '11 at 18:07
    
@aschepler: On the first one, yeah I was. Thanks, now fixed. –  Ben Voigt Mar 18 '11 at 18:10
    
Just to be pedantic - you need a semicolon after the closing brace of struct local. You do on my compiler, at least (Borland/CodeGear). –  drkvogel Jan 6 at 16:53
1  
@TheMask: You can add data members to the class. To share data between the function and the nested function, you can either put them in the class and have the outer function access them through an instance, or put reference inside the class. The first is called hoisting, and is what the C# compiler does to create closures. The second is what C++11 prefers when it creates lambdas. Naturally with C++ capture-by-reference closures (with or without lambda syntax) you have to worry about object lifetime. –  Ben Voigt Mar 29 at 15:27

The construct that comes closest to nested functions is the C++11 lambda.

void SomeFunction(int x)
{
    int var = 2;
    auto lambda = [&] (int param) -> int { return var + param; };

    printf("var + x = %d\n", lambda(x));
}

Lamdas allow to use variables from the outer scope (the [&] specifies to automatically capture all variables from the outer scope by reference). A lambda, that does not use any variables from the outer scope (use []) can be converted to a function pointer of the same type and can thus be passed to functions accepting a function pointer.

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use local functor

#define lambda(return_type, function_body) \
struct { return_type operator () function_body }


int main ()
{
    lambda(int, (int x, int y) { return x > y ? x : y; } ) maxFunc;
    int m = maxFunc(1,2); //=> 2
    ...
}
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+1 I really like the simmplicity of your "C lambda". But if the asker talks about "from C to C++", suggest C++ style (C++11 lambdas) instead of macros :) –  Manu343726 Jul 5 '13 at 10:32
    
Cute trick: but gcc local functions also capture function-local variables... –  Yakk Jul 9 at 20:47

You could try using boost::phoenix (v2 is a subpackage of spirit, v3 is in svn/trunk as it's own package and should be in 1.47)

#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>

using namespace boost::phoenix::arg_names;

int foo( int foo_var )
{
 /*code*/
  boost::function<int(int)> bar = _1 + 5;
  return bar(foo_var);
}

int main() {
return foo(1);
}
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What's the magic behind this? –  The Mask Mar 29 at 6:32
1  
@TheMask _1 is a special type that has all the basic operators overloaded to produce expression-trees instead of doing anything. When a tree is passed arguments with operator(), it can walk teh built expression tree and substitute arguments for _N. For more info you'll need to beef up on MPL and Boost.Proto quite a bit. –  KitsuneYMG Mar 29 at 14:23

AFAIK, nested functions are not allowed in C++.

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In C++ you may achieve the same effect by other possible means. There are no direct nested function implementations. Two helpful links:

http://www.respower.com/~earlye/programming/19990916.001.htm

http://www.devx.com/tips/Tip/40841

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