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I am hoping someone can point out the correct way to specialize a method in a template class while using "extern template class" and "template class" for explicit instantiation with gnu c++. I've tried to boil down this problem with the simplest example that mimics my real problem. It appears that declaring "extern template" implies a template instantiation which causes errors when specializing methods. Given a driver program:

main.cc

#include A_H
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    A<int> ai;
    A<long> al;

    std::cout << "ai=" << ai.get() << " al=" << al.get() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

And the following implemntation of A

a.h

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    int get() const;
};

extern template class A<int>;
extern template class A<long>;

a.cc

#include "a.h"

template<typename T>
int A<T>::get() const
{
    return 0;
}

template<>
int A<long>::get() const
{
    return 1;
}

template class A<int>;
template class A<long>;

I receive the following error when compiling with either, g++ 4.1.2 or 4.4.4

 % g++ -Wall -g -D'A_H="a.h"' a.cc main.cc          
a.cc:10: error: specialization of 'int A<T>::get() const [with T = long int]' after instantiation
 %

If I comment out the two "extern template" lines in a.h, things compile and work as expected with both compilers. I assume depending on the existence of an explicit instantiation in the absence of "extern template" is unspecified behavior even in C++0x, otherwise, what's the point of C++0x adding "extern template"?

If I instead implement A as:

a-hack.h

template<typename T>
struct A
{
    int get() const;
};

template<typename T>
int A<T>::get() const
{
    return 0;
}

template<>
inline
int A<long>::get() const
{
    return 1;
}

extern template class A<int>;
extern template class A<long>;

a-hack.cc

#include "a-hack.h"

template class A<int>;
template class A<long>;

and compile again, this works as expected

% g++ -Wall -g -D'A_H="a-hack.h"' a-hack.cc main.cc
% ./a.out 
ai=0 al=1

However, in my real world example, this causes a program crash with g++ 4.1.2 (while working for g++ 4.4.4). I have not narrowed down the exact cause of the crash (segmentation fault). It only appears as if the stack pointer is corrupted within what would be the call to A<>::get().

I realize that explicit template instantiation is non-standard at this point, but would anyone expect what I've done above to work? If not, what is the correct way to do this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
c++0x removed extern template, because it was too difficult to implement, no? –  BЈовић Mar 18 '11 at 18:32
3  
@VJo: export was removed. extern (for templates) was added. –  James McNellis Mar 18 '11 at 18:40
    
@James Must be something new, as I haven't seen exported templates so far –  BЈовић Mar 18 '11 at 20:38
    
@VJo: Yes, it's new in C++0x, though some compilers have supported it as an extension for some time. Visual C++ has had it since 2005. –  James McNellis Mar 18 '11 at 20:44
    
@VJo, @James: James' last reply [20:44] seems to conflate two different things (where his comment of [18:40] was clearer). export templates were implemented by EDG, standardized in C++03, and removed in C++11 after no other compiler vendor ever picked them up. extern templates have been supported by EDG/GCC/IBM/Metrowerks/MSVC since 2003 (source: N1448, see also N1987), but were standardized only in C++11 (similar to what happened with long long). –  Quuxplusone Apr 14 at 19:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted
extern template class A<long>;

This line says that A<long> is to be explicitly instantiated according to the definitions the compiler has already seen. When you add a specialization later, you break that meaning.

Add a declaration of your specialization to the header file.

template <typename T> struct A { /*...*/ };
template<> int A<long>::get() const;
extern template class A<int>;
extern template class A<long>;

In general, it's best to put as many specialization declarations as possible in the same header file as the primary template, to reduce surprises for the compiler about which declaration should be used for any particular instantiation.


Notice that the extern template declaration isn't necessary if you're dealing with a single template entity (as opposed to this case, where we have to instruct the compiler about both the class A<long> and the function A<long>::get()). If you want to specialize a function template in another translation unit, it suffices to write just template<>.

template<typename T> int freeGet() { return 0; }  // you can even add "inline" here safely!
template<> int freeGet<long>();  // this function is not inline (14.7.3/12)

But you must have the <> there. If you omit the <>, the declaration turns into an explicit instantiation of the default implementation (return 0), which is likely not what you wanted! Even if you add extern, the compiler is allowed to inline that default implementation; if your code unexpectedly breaks when you pass -O2, you might have accidentally omitted the <> somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
That was it, thanks! Do you have an idea as to why it is necessary for "extern template" or its dependents to care about the existence of a specialization? The "name" of the method is int A<long>::get() const regardless, and the explicit instantiation could ensure that only the correct definition of that is available at link time. –  Roland Mar 18 '11 at 20:51
1  
@Roland In general, you could do something like template <> class A<long> { int iHaveNoGetFunctionAtAll(); }; such that in fact a A<long>::get() function does not even exist! This might be a reason why the compiler requires to declare the specilization before applying "extern template" with it. –  eci Mar 25 '11 at 17:34
    
Excellent answer, but could you add whether it is legal to combine lines 2 and 4 of your example into the single line extern template<> int A<long>::get() const;? That's the question I came here in hopes of answering. –  Quuxplusone Apr 14 at 19:19
    
@Quuxplusone: Not in that syntax. If you want an explicit specialization (which you must define), use the template<> int A<long>:get() const; version. If you want an explicit instantiation (defined via the template), don't put any brackets after template: template int A<long>::get() const; (add extern in front to make it not a definition). –  aschepler Apr 14 at 19:28
    
What if I want an explicit extern specialization, but want to express that concept in one single declaration? Impossible? –  Quuxplusone Apr 14 at 19:37

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