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I have to develop a widget that will be used by a third party site. This is not an application to be deployed in a social networking site. I can give the site guys a link to be used as the src of an iframe or I can develop it as a JavaScript request.

Can someone please tell me the trade offs between the 2 approaches(IFrame versus JS)?

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6 Answers 6

I was searching about the same question and I found this interesting article:
http://prettyprint.me/prettyprint.me/2009/05/30/widgets-iframe-vs-inline/

I will add more links here if I found something interesting.

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Why not doing both ?

I prefer to offer third party sites a script like:

 <script type="text/javascript" src="urlToScript"></script>

the file on your server looks like :

document.writeln('<iframe src="pathToYourGroovyWidget" 
name="MagicIframe" width="300" height="600" align="left" scrolling="no" 
marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" frameborder="0"></iframe>');

UPDATE:

the big disadvantage of using an iframe that points to an url on your server is that you do not generate a "real" backlink if someone clicks on an url from your server pointing to your server.

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I'm sure many developers/site owners would appreciate a Javascript solution that they can style to their needs rather than using an iframe. If I was going to include a component from a third party, I would rather do it via Javascript because I would have more control.

As far as ease of use, both are similar in simplicity, so no real tradeoff there.

One other thought, make sure you get a SSL cert for whatever domain you're hosting this on and write out the include statement accordingly if the page is served over SSL. In case your site owners have a reason for using SSL, they would surely appreciate this, because Firefox and other browsers will complain when a page is served with a mix of secure/insecure content.

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If the widget can be embedded in an iframe, it will be better for the frontend performance of the hosting site as iframes do not block content download. However, as others have commented there are other drawbacks to using iframes.

If you do implement in javascript, please consider frontend performance best practices when developing. In particular, you should look at Non blocking javascript loading. Google analytics and other 3rd party widget providers support this method of loading. It would also help if you can load the javascript at the bottom of the page.

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Nice to know that it's not to be deployed in a social networking site... that merely leaves the rest of the web ;-)

What would be most useful depends on your widget. IFrames and javascript generally serve quite different purposes, and can be mixed (i.e. javascript inside an iframe, or javascript creating an iframe).

  • IFrames got sizing issues; if it's supposed to be an exact fit to the page, do you know that it renders the same on all browsers, the data won't overflow it's container etc?
  • IFrames are simple. They can be a simple, static HTML-page.
  • When using IFrames, you expose your widget quite plainly.
  • But then again, why not have your third party site simply include the HMTL at a given url? The HTML can then be extended to contain javascript when/if you need it.
  • Pure Javascript allows for more flexibility but at the cost of some complexity.
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1  
Another benefit I could see to using an iFrame over JavaScript is that any CSS or Javascript it requires would be self-contained and wouldn't interfere with the calling website. Of course you could easily get around this by using non-generic selectors. –  Noz Feb 14 '13 at 21:20
    
in an iframe you can use SLL, in javascript the parent website must have ssl installed. –  Yehia A.Salam Mar 13 '13 at 8:50

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