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I am building a small data intensive app with Windows Forms. In the main project I have a folder that holds my DBML as well as data classes to provide CRUD operations against the database. There are about 10 said data classes currently.

The code behind in the form instantiates business objects and makes calls against them to do all the work. These business objects are making calls against the static data access classes.

An example of a data class would be something like this

static class CustomerData
{
    public static IEnumerable<Customer> GetCustomersForRun(int runID)
    { 
         var db = new FooDataContext("connectionString");
         return db.Customers.Where(ri => ri.RunID == runID);
    }
}

Now obviously there are a few problems with my initial design that I need to address.

1) It's not nice to have each static method need to create its own DataContext. This doesn't seem very DRY at all.

2) Because I'm relying on some lazy loading I'm not able to wrap my DataContext in a using statement.

A couple of different ideas I have to fix this problem are

1) Get rid of the static methods and instead create an abstract base data access class that can instantiate my DataContext.

2) Have each business object create it's own DataContext and pass that into the static methods of the data access classes.

An example of the method signature would then be

public static IEnumerable<Customer> GetCustomerForRun(DataContext db, int runID)

My specific questions are

1) Am I over complicating this?

2) Do you typically dispose of your DataContext objects?

3) Which of my solutions makes most sense? If none of them what do you recommend?

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Check out Repository and Unit of Work pattern: google.ca/… –  Thomas Li Mar 18 '11 at 19:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1) Am I over complicating this?

It really depends if your application is very small shoehorning a pattern into the mix might make things more complicated where simply using the DataContext might make things easier to understand instead of putting a layer of abstraction on top of linq to sql.

2) Do you typically dispose of your DataContext objects?

It will depend on your implamentation, if you plan on passing an IQueryable<T> around to do filtering wrapping a using(){} block will cause your grief. Since linq to sql only triggers a sql query when you do something that calls GetEnumerator() your context might be disposed and your call will fail.

Conceder this example:

IQueryable<Table> GetStuff()
{
  using(var db = new DataContext())
  {
     return db.Tables.Where(i=>i.Id == 1);
  }
}

if in another method you try to do this GetStuff().Where(i=> i.Name == "Jon").ToList() will cause the query to fail as the context has already been disposed.

Now if you don't do that you can gain the power of IQueryable

IQueryable<Table> GetStuff()
{
  return db.Tables.Where(i=>i.Id == 1);
}

GetStuff().Where(i=> i.Name == "Jon").ToList() will work and allow you to filter out your query and defer execution of the sql statement until the very last minute. More information can be found here.

3) Which of my solutions makes most sense? If none of them what do you recommend?

I usually try to stay away from static classes/methods since it makes doing unit tests very difficult. Probably some good information would be to look at the Repository pattern and this answer which gives some quick information.

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