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I have in my class definition the following enum:

static class Myclass {
     ...
  public:    
     enum encoding { BINARY, ASCII, ALNUM, NUM };
     Myclass(Myclass::encoding);
     ...
}

Then in the method definition:

Myclass::Myclass(Myclass::encoding enc) {
    ...
}

This doesn't work, but what am I doing wrong? How do I pass an enum member correctly, that is defined inside a class for member methods (and other methods as well)?

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1  
What error are you getting? –  David Given Mar 18 '11 at 19:45
    
Dup of: C++ pass enum as parameter –  Brian Roach Mar 18 '11 at 19:46
4  
What is static class trying to achieve? –  pmr Mar 18 '11 at 19:47
    
possible duplicate of My enum is not a class or namespace –  marioc64 Sep 22 at 12:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not entirely sure why you're using "static class" here. This boilerplate works just fine for me in VS2010:

class CFoo
{
public:
    enum Bar { baz, morp, bleep };
    CFoo(Bar);
};

CFoo::CFoo(Bar barIn)
{
    barIn;
}
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This code is fine:

/* static */ class Myclass
{
  public:    
     enum encoding { BINARY, ASCII, ALNUM, NUM };
     Myclass(Myclass::encoding); // or: MyClass( encoding );
     encoding getEncoding() const;
}; // semicolon

Myclass::Myclass(Myclass::encoding enc)
{    // or:     (enum Myclass::encoding enc), they're the same
     // or:     (encoding enc), with or without the enum
}

enum Myclass::encoding Myclass::getEncoding() const
//or Myclass::encoding, but Myclass:: is required
{
}

int main()
{
    Myclass c(Myclass::BINARY);
    Myclass::encoding e = c.getEncoding();
}

Update your question with the real code and errors you're getting so we can solve real problems instead of fake ones. (Give us a * compilable* example that reproduces your problem.)

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+ 1 Good answer –  J T Mar 18 '11 at 21:17
    
+1 Since you marked it as CW, I have updated it with other options (full qualification of the enum type is not required as the scope of the function declaration/definition is that of the class. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '11 at 22:22

Remove the static. Generally, mentioning the exact error will help you get better answers.

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class Myclass {
     ...
public:    
     enum encoding { BINARY, ASCII, ALNUM, NUM };
     Myclass(enum Myclass::encoding);
     ...
}

Myclass::Myclass(enum Myclass::encoding enc) {
     ...
}

Just just forgot the enum keyword in the parameter.

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That isn't needed or valid. –  GManNickG Mar 18 '11 at 19:56
    
Why the down vote? This code is solid. Code works beautifully in GCC 4.5.0 and msvc8/9 –  J T Mar 18 '11 at 19:57
    
@JT: I didn't down vote. And it's my understanding this should be broken, as elaborated type-specifiers (I thought) are not valid for enum's, but perhaps not. Either way, this won't fix his problem because, assuming it is valid, it's just equivalent to his own code: it's not needed. –  GManNickG Mar 18 '11 at 19:57
    
@GMan, Is it okay if you elaborate why this isn't needed or valid, I have been writing code like J T's for years... (seemingly without problems) –  Tom Mar 18 '11 at 20:03
    
i agree. should work. –  madmik3 Mar 18 '11 at 20:04

See this:

C++ pass enum as parameter

You reference it differently depending on the scope. In your own class you say

Myclass(encoding e);
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2  
adding extra scope qualifiers will not break the code –  J T Mar 18 '11 at 20:01

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