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*Hey everyone, I am working on a query and am unsure how to make it process as quickly as possible and with as little redundancy as possible. I am really hoping someone there can help me come up with a good way of doing this.

Thanks in advance for the help!*

Okay, so here is what I have as best I can explain it. I have simplified the tables and math to just get across what I am trying to understand.

Basically I have a smallish table that never changes and will always only have 50k records like this:

Values_Table

ID      Value1     Value2
1          2           7
2          2           7.2
3          3           7.5
4          33          10
….50000     44       17.2

And a couple tables that constantly change and are rather large, eg a potential of up to 5 million records:

Flags_Table

Index      Flag1    Type
1           0       0
2             0       1
3             1       0
4            1       1
….5,000,000 1       1

Users_Table

Index           Name       ASSOCIATED_ID
1               John           1
2               John           1
3               Paul           3
4               Paul           3
….5,000,000 Richard         2

I need to tie all 3 tables together. The most results that are likely to ever be returned from the small table is somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 results. The large tables are joined on the index and these are then joined to the Values_Table ON Values_Table.ID = Users_Table.ASSOCIATED_ID …. That part is easy enough.

Where it gets tricky for me is that I need to return, as quickly as possible, a list limited to 10 results where value1 and value2 are mathematically operated on to return a new_ value where that new_value is less than 10 and the result is sorted by that new_value and any other where statements I need can be applied to the flags. I do need to be able to move along the limit. EG LIMIT 0,10 / 11,10 / 21,10 etc...

In a subsequent (or the same if possible) query I need to get the top 10 count of all types that matched that criteria before the limit was applied.

So for example I want to join all of these and return anything where Value1 + Value2 < 10 AND I also need the count.

So what I want is:

Index      Name           Flag1 New_Value
1           John           0           9
2           John           0           9
5000000 Richard         1           9.2

The second response would be:

ID (not index)      Count
    1                  2
    2                  1

I tried this a few ways and ultimately came up with the following somewhat ugly query:

SELECT INDEX, NAME, Flag1, (Value1 * some_variable + Value2) as New_Value
FROM Values_Table
JOIN Users_Table ON ASSOCIATED_ID = ID
JOIN Flags_Table ON Flags_Table.Index = Users_Table.Index
WHERE (Value1 * some_variable + Value1) < 10
ORDER BY New_Value
LIMIT 0,10

And then for the count:

SELECT ID, COUNT(TYPE) as Count, (Value1 * some_variable + Value2) as New_Value
FROM Values_Table
JOIN Users_Table ON ASSOCIATED_ID = ID
JOIN Flags_Table ON Flags_Table.Index = Users_Table.Index
WHERE (Value1 * some_variable + Value1) < 10
GROUP BY TYPE
ORDER BY New_Value
LIMIT 0,10

Being able to filter on the different flags and such in my WHERE clause is important; that may sound stupid to comment on but I mention that because from what I could see a quicker method would have been to use the HAVING statement but I don't believe that will work in certain instance depending on what I want to use my WHERE clause to filter against.

And when filtering using the flags table :

SELECT INDEX, NAME, Flag1, (Value1 * some_variable + Value2) as New_Value
FROM Values_Table
JOIN Users_Table ON ASSOCIATED_ID = ID
JOIN Flags_Table ON Flags_Table.Index = Users_Table.Index
WHERE (Value1 * some_variable + Value1) < 10 AND Flag1 = 0
ORDER BY New_Value
LIMIT 0,10

...filtered count:

SELECT ID, COUNT(TYPE) as Count, (Value1 * some_variable + Value2) as New_Value
FROM Values_Table
JOIN Users_Table ON ASSOCIATED_ID = ID
JOIN Flags_Table ON Flags_Table.Index = Users_Table.Index
WHERE (Value1 * some_variable + Value1) < 10 AND Flag1 = 0
GROUP BY TYPE
ORDER BY New_Value
LIMIT 0,10

That works fine but has to run the math multiple times for each row, and I get the nagging feeling that it is also running the math multiple times on the same row in the Values_table table. My thought was that I should just get only the valid responses from the Values_table first and then join those to the other tables to cut down on the processing; with how SQL optimizes things though I wasn't sure if it might not already be doing that. I know I could use a HAVING clause to only run the math once if I did it that way but I am uncertain how I would then best join things.

My questions are:

  1. Can I avoid running that math twice and still make the query work (or I suppose if there is a good way to make the first one work as well that would be great)
  2. What is the fastest way to do this as this is something that will be running very often.

It seems like this should be painfully simple but I am just missing something stupid.

I contemplated pulling into a temp table then joining that table to itself but that seems like I would trade math for iterations against the table and still end up slow.

Thank you all for your help in this and please let me know if I need to clarify anything here!

** To clarify on a question, I can't use a 3rd column with the values pre-calculated because in reality the math is much more complex then addition, I just simplified it for illustration's sake.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you have a benchmark query to compare against? Usually it doesn't work to try to outsmart the optimizer. If you have acceptable performance from a starting query, then you can see where extra work is being expended (indicated by disk reads, cache consumption, etc.) and focus on that.

Avoid the temptation to break it into pieces and solve those. That's an antipattern. That includes temp tables especially.

Redundant math is usually ok - what hurts is disk activity. I've never seen a query that needed CPU work reduction on pure calculations.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I wondered about that. The actual query is simple radians, multiplication etc so it isn't anything killer. I figured that odds were good that the optimizer would cache and reuse the answer. I tried it with and without the duplicate math (removed it from the output but left it in the where) and saw no speed difference that couldn't just be explained by variance so for what that is worth.... –  yesterdayze Mar 19 '11 at 13:25

Gather your results and put them in a temp table

SELECT * into TempTable FROM (SELECT INDEX, NAME, Type, ID, Flag1, (Value1 + Value2) as New_Value
               FROM Values_Table
               JOIN Users_Table ON ASSOCIATED_ID = ID
               JOIN Flags_Table ON Flags_Table.Index = Users_Table.Index
WHERE New_Value < 10)
ORDER BY New_Value
LIMIT 0,10

Return Result for First Query

SELECT INDEX, NAME, Flag1, New_Value 
FROM TempTable

Return Results for count of Types

Select ID, Count(Type)
FROM TempTable
GROUP BY TYPE
share|improve this answer
    
John, Thank you for the help! Assuming that I will be getting thousands of queries for this data every minute will creating these temp tables slow me down? I had contemplated doing it this way but was worried about the overhead of temp tables. Also I had tried defining the value in the select part and filtering it in the where clause but it kept telling me that "New_Value" didn't exist. I assumed that I could not use a value in the where statement that I had defined in the select but maybe I had a typo somewhere. I will revisit that. –  yesterdayze Mar 18 '11 at 21:11

Is there any chance that you can add a third column to the values_table with the pre-calculated value? Even if the result of your calculation is dependent on other variables, you could run the calculation for the whole table but only when those variables change.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't do that unfortuantly :/ The math I used in the sample is just as an example. In reality it has a variable in there as well. So perhaps a better example would have been (Value1 * X + value2) as New_Value. –  yesterdayze Mar 18 '11 at 21:02

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